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New Durston Iceline Trekking Poles — but no straps :/


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Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) New Durston Iceline Trekking Poles — but no straps :/

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 87 total)
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  • #3812093
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    Get this. I bought a sleeping bag and the whole bottom half was missing, then I bought a tent without poles. Then I went to put them in my pack, but I discovered it didn’t have a frame. Sacrilegious! What were they thinking?

    #3812097
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    Get this. I bought a sleeping bag and the whole bottom half was missing, then I bought a tent without poles. Then I went to put them in my pack, but I discovered it didn’t have a frame. Sacrilegious! What were they thinking?

    ha~!

    #3812099
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    Get this. I bought a sleeping bag and the whole bottom half was missing, then I bought a tent without poles. Then I went to put them in my pack, but I discovered it didn’t have a frame. Sacrilegious! What were they thinking?

    But, boy, was your kit lightweight!

    #3812100
    MJ H
    BPL Member

    @mjh

    I have one set of poles without straps and I’ve found that I tend to put my hands on top of the handle (as opposed to my usual grip from the side) when I’m going downhill. I think that works better, but it’s probably wrong.

    #3812110
    Lester Moore
    BPL Member

    @satori

    Locale: Olympic Peninsula, WA

    If you do a lot of photography or videography while hiking then going strapless makes things much less cumbersome on the trail. I can quickly stow unstrapped trekking poles between my legs or throw them on the ground to get a fast shot or video. This is especially true if you use your trekking poles as part of your camera support system.

    I also find straps less efficient on steep uphill, cupping my palms over the top of the poles instead. And on really steep areas it’s nice to grab the pole below the grip on the shaft. I do prefer straps on long steep downhills, on extended areas of snow, or if trying to hike as fast as possible using the poles to lever forward like skate skiers do.

    #3812132
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    Thanks for all the comments. Seems like most people like the design but quite a few would like straps.

    The straps have been an unexpectedly passionate topic. I personally prefer no straps, as when I’m hiking for hours I’m not putting down high propulsion forces through my arms (like nordic skiing) where I find gripping the handle fatiguing. I think a lot of people would like going no straps with it’s simplicity, lighter weight, and ability to release the pole easier if it gets caught. But I also totally recognize that there are many folks that strongly prefer straps and I certainly don’t think they’re wrong nor want to many spend hours trying to convince otherwise.

    This first version is just that – a first version. It will be great for people that like no straps. It’s selling fast and won’t last that much longer (maybe a few weeks or less). When we do a second batch later this year we will be able to expand the lineup and offer a no strap version as well. So I appreciate the feedback and am planning to add a strap option for the next run.

    #3812134
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    “I will be interested to see how long the pole tips last. I’m sure he has done plenty of testing. Most manufacturers will add a replaceable plastic pole tip when using a carbon lower section. These poles appear to be conspicuously naked carbon all the way down to the carbide point. Dan says these are designed for a “multi-week traverse of Alaska’s Brooks Range” and that’s some rocky country.”

    Yes the tips are naked carbon all the way down to the metal tip (the lowest half inch or so). However the wall thickness also increases so they are pretty tough. I’ve pretty hard on these in testing including a lot of talus field crossings. Obviously they’ll get some scratches but I don’t expect a high breakage risk.

    However, if someone prefers a more traditional tip that is super easy to add. The tips here are essentially what is underneath the plastic tip in other poles, so it is quite easy to grab some tips at a local outdoors store and add them on.

    One advantage of this design (besides the lower weight) is that if you do lose the carbide tip in the future, you can glue on new tips without having the huge pain of removing the old ones. We’re also going to have spare tip sections available on a non-profit basis, so if someone breaks one there’s not going to be a big barrier to getting that fixed. Probably about $15 for a tip and $6 shipping.

    #3812137
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    That sounds like a plan.

    I added straps to some GG LT3 poles. I made a small yoke out of hypalon and sewed some old BD Distance straps on. I pushed a neoprene well nut down into the pole shaft and then attached the strap via a nylon screw and washer. Very light and easy to install/remove.


    I did not dig the well nut out for the photo, but it weighs very little.

    Anyway, just a suggestion on how to make this modular. Keep up the good work, Dan.

    #3812138
    Ross Bleakney
    BPL Member

    @rossbleakney

    Locale: Cascades

    I have one set of poles without straps and I’ve found that I tend to put my hands on top of the handle (as opposed to my usual grip from the side) when I’m going downhill.

    If you don’t have straps that is pretty much the only way to do it. It isn’t bad, it just isn’t as good as also having the option of having straps. I don’t think I ever grip from the side. When going uphill I use the straps and when going downhill I mostly use the straps but will sometimes put my hand over the top (especially if it is a really steep section and I don’t want to adjust the pole).

    #3812140
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I almost always place my hands on the top of my poles when going downhill. But of course this depends on our definition of “downhill”!  I mean when descending  over one or several thousand feet of mountainous terrain. I’m sure folks  that hike along the AT, where trails go radically up and down, might also use their hands at the top of their poles while descending steep and even precarious sections of trail.

    #3812143
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    I’d like a trekking pole that started beeping when I forget about it and walked away

    As opposed to remembering when I walked 1/4 mile away and having to go back

    This is more of an attempt at humor, but maybe…

    #3812146
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    That’s a good idea Jerry. Seems like a game changer feature :)  I’ve walked away from poles on at least 2 occasions. Once on the PCT where I was able to hitch hike back and chase them down, the other time forgotten for good at a trailhead.

    #3812195
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    That’s happened to me a couple times so I quit using trekking poles

    Someone else mentioned that too, on this thread maybe

    You could have electronics in the handle.  Accelerometer to detect if it’s moving.  If it stops moving, it could quietly start beeping.  Bluetooth to your phone app so you could configure it – delay before beeping, volume,…

    People love to buy high tech things (even if they’re not useful : )

    This is still mostly humor : )

    #3812202
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    What’s that noise?
    It’s your poles again grandpa. They’re beeping…

    #3812203
    Jon Fong / Flat Cat Gear
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    This is suprisingly easy to do with a smart phone.  Creat a BT link to the pole and when the seperation is outside of the BT range, an alram goes off.  Not an issue for me, I don’t use trekking poles.

     

    #3812208
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    good idea

    I wonder if there are any existing products you could attach to your trekking pole to do that – BT connection

    #3812218
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    For  some–me included–the idea of heading out without my poles is ridiculous. It’s a bit like imagining a horse heading out with only two legs. Or in my case, a mule. Well, a frog. My point is, I’ve become so used to my “front legs” that I’m not likely to leave them behind.

    When I first started using poles, I bought a pair of ski poles out a ‘used items’ container at REI. They cost about ten bucks. I sawed the shafts to an appropriate length and all was good. Except, yes I did walk off one morning, leaving them behind. I hoped they might be welcome for some hiker following after me, so didn’t return to retrieve them. I should have, given LNT principles.  it was the last day of a weeks long hike and retrieving  them would have  been doubly exhausting.

    If someone ever found a pair of ski poles cut off to conform  to backpackers’ needs, and was grateful for the find..,you owe me ten bucks.

    #3812219
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    Are you calling me a horse with two legs?  Or a mule or a frog?

    I can see how I might quit forgetting them after I got more used to them.  I only used them on maybe three trips.

    #3812225
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “Are you calling me a horse with two legs?  Or a mule or a frog?”

    No!! I’m calling ME those things!!!

    However now you’ve inadvertently reminded me of a song.

    I’ve been to the desert with a horse with no name

    it felt good to get out of the rain.

    in the desert, you can remember your name

    ’cause there ain’t no one  for to give ya no pain”…etc.

    Don’t go to the desert on a horse with two legs!! You’re all welcome.

    #3812263
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    For some–me included–the idea of heading out without my poles is ridiculous.

    You should give a cane a chance. You might find yourself abandoning poles like I did over 30 years ago.

     

     

    #3812266
    MJ H
    BPL Member

    @mjh

    I’ve thought about getting a staff, but never a cane.

    #3812284
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    I’ve thought about getting a staff, but never a cane.

    I started backpacking with a staff in 1975. I went several years and a thousand miles with one. Then I switched to poles (before trekking poles were even remotely a “thing” – used to get weird looks with them). Did a few backpacks with poles and ultimately didn’t like them. Switched back to a staff until around 1992, when I went to a cane. I use poles occasionally, but will never switch back from a cane. Think of it as a backpackers ice axe. A third point of contact, light, easy on the wrists, leaves a hand free. It quite simply works better than anything I’ve tried.

    #3812291
    john mcalpine
    BPL Member

    @cowpie

    Strapless here!   I like to move fast.  Sort of like a run.   If the pole finds a hole I want to let go instead of it snapping.

    #3812300
    MJ H
    BPL Member

    @mjh

    Brad, is it the perpendicular handle that makes it better for you? I mostly use poles to take pressure of my joints when descending, so I’d be concerned about having something with shorter reach than a trekking pole.

    #3812343
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Southern Indiana

    The big attraction I see with the Iceline over GG LT5 is the collapsable length of 49 cm vs 60 cm for GG. Still doesn’t compare with the 42 cm folded length of 125 cm BD Distance Carbon Z’s but of course Z Pole is fixed length. Nevertheless, for trail runners, fast packers, adventure racers, FKT etc, Distance Z’s are the bomb.

    Iceline description say” higher strength carbon and larger diameter tubing”. I don’t doubt it’s true but larger than what specifically…. GG, BD? I’ve had so many carbon poles break in the rugged Southwest mountains that I gave up on them and went to aluminum BD’s and Komperdells. However, if the Iceline has a thicker tubing on the vulnerable lower sections than other carbon poles (of comparable weight) it’s something I might consider. But I only use 1 pole so too bad they’re not available as singles. Many people would probably pay $95 for just one.

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 87 total)
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