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New Durston Iceline Trekking Poles — but no straps :/


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Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) New Durston Iceline Trekking Poles — but no straps :/

Viewing 25 posts - 51 through 75 (of 103 total)
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  • #3812347
    baja bob
    BPL Member

    @bajabob

    Locale: West

    Larger meaning most 3 piece poles are 18/16/14mm diameter or 16/14/12mm diameter.  The Icelines have a 16mm bottom section rather than 12 or 14 mm

    #3812361
    Nicholas P
    BPL Member

    @io

    Locale: Acadia National Park

    Good timing on these ( almost ). I just snapped a carbon pole in half yesterday on a weekend trip, since   it was the middle section that broke and only  about 4 inches of it just below the adjustment  I was able to pop it back in and be on my way. However it left me wanting a sturdier pair. I do usually use aluminum poles for more rugged terrain and for winter, but had chosen to use the lighter carbon ones despite being in some of the most rugged terrain the Appalachians have to offer (so kinda on me). Anyway I’m in the strapless camp for backpacking use for reasons others have mentioned and specifically because I’m constantly changing my grip on the pole do too constantly varying terrain.
    These poles look almost perfect but for one omittance, and it is definitely not for me the lack of straps, but the lack of an extended grip. On steep uphills my hands spend a good deal of time below the main grip and to me it is well worth an extra ounce or two for the added functionality .
    I may be the only one but I think it could be the perfect pole if Dan would consider an extended grip on a Future release. Thoughts anyone ? Dan Durston?

    #3812362
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “Thoughts anyone?”

    Extended grips add weight and cost. And  they look bad to some. I think the idea is to extend the length of your poles to allow you to grip the established cork of  foam areas when  going uphill or downhill. but yes, this is annoying.

    #3812363
    Nicholas P
    BPL Member

    @io

    Locale: Acadia National Park

    jscott

    “Annoying” is an understatement, I live in Maine and mostly backpack in Maine/New England where the difference between up and down hill is often a matter of seconds , if I had to stop and adjust for every change in grade I would not use poles at all.For me the weight difference is trivial and I would gladly pay a few bucks more for that weight. But I do understand that this is not the case for everyone and if I lived near  the Sierras or the Rockies I might have a different preference.

     

    #3812364
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    Brad, is it the perpendicular handle that makes it better for you? I mostly use poles to take pressure of my joints when descending, so I’d be concerned about having something with shorter reach than a trekking pole.

    MJH, good question – yes, having the handle perpendicular (horizontal) is a plus, but also having the distance shorter between the ground and your hand/arm makes a significant difference. It gives a more sure sense of contact and leverage. I find a cane far superior for uphill, especially given one hand is free. I’m sure poles will be better for some people, but I wouldn’t just settle on poles without trying other implements and methods. There’s a lot of group think in all things, and backpacking is no exception. Experiment, to find what works for you. You might be surprised. I find flailing along all day with poles rather tiring and uncomfortable. I’ve never felt that way with a staff or cane. OTOH, my wife like poles. Vive la difference.

    #3812368
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I prefer an extended grip as well. I like a couple inches below the flared out part that my hand rests on. I’ll drop down so that ridge is below my index finger when I want a shorter grip for the next few steps.

    #3812375
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    It would be easy to make your own extended grip with bicycle grip tape.

    If I were so inclined to trekking poles, I’d be all over these from Durston.

    #3812396
    Nicholas P
    BPL Member

    @io

    Locale: Acadia National Park

    It would be easy to make your own extended grip with bicycle grip tape.

    I was thinking about maybe doing this or something like Plastidip or some other rubberized spray on product, but I’m not sure I would necessarily like the results. I think I would much prefer a factory installed EVA grip.

    EVA is good for the extensions because it is lightweight but if I had my druthers I would also probably opt for cork for the main grip.

    #3812399
    MJ H
    BPL Member

    @mjh

    MJH, good question – yes, having the handle perpendicular (horizontal) is a plus, but also having the distance shorter between the ground and your hand/arm makes a significant difference.

    Thanks. That shorter distance would also mean the cane is probably too short to hold up a shelter so I’d need to carry a pole. But I do often find myself wishing for a free hand.

    #3812422
    K2 Travels
    BPL Member

    @k2-travels

    Looks like a great pole. Improved the weak/worst part of a GG pole(thin, weak bottom section). Though the lack of at least a tiny basket is strange….maybe they are compatible with most baskets?

    K2

    #3812426
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    They are built by Komperdell, so I’m thinking those baskets would fit. But not BD or similar units that use the screw-on basket retaining method.

    #3812452
    Dustin V
    BPL Member

    @dustinv

    +1 on bicycle grip tape. You can customize thickness, texture, color…

    #3812454
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Southern Indiana

    I’m not able to find how much adjustment range the Iceline poles provide. BD Distance Carbon FLZ’s have 15 cm of range on all 3 sizes. Actually they have much in common with the Iceline in that the FLZ’s feature 1 outer flicklock adjustor on the top section. Iceline probably has a thicker and more robust lower carbon tube however and is also about an ounce lighter. BD Distance Carbon FLZ weighs 6 oz each (M) with straps and the Iceline would weigh near 5 oz with straps. The big advantage of the BD poles is that they collapse down so much smaller. For example the medium FLZ which has a range of 110cm to 125 cm folds up to 37 cm compared to 49 cm for Iceline.

     

    #3812455
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    “Iceline description say..larger diameter tubing”. I don’t doubt it’s true but larger than what specifically…. GG, BD?”
    My video goes into this a bit more, but as baja bob says, most poles are 18/16/14 or 16/14/12 mm, with lightweight 3 piece poles almost always being 16/14/12. The Iceline poles are 18/16/16, so you have a thicker pole at the bottom where it is most needed. The 16mm lower section is thicker than almost all other trekking poles. For example the GG LT5, Black Diamond Z, and Locus Gear CP3 are all 12mm lower sections.

    “If the Iceline has a thicker tubing on the vulnerable lower sections than other carbon poles (of comparable weight) it’s something I might consider. But I only use 1 pole so too bad they’re not available as singles.”
    We have done break tests and the Iceline poles are stronger (lower flex, higher break point) than comparable ultralight poles, but I don’t want to give the impression of a super tough pole. They are still a lightweight pole that isn’t going to be as strong as much heavier pole. For example, the BD Alpine Carbon Cork is stronger but it also weighs almost twice as much. This trade off will always exist, but the Iceline’s do lessen it. Previously I would often opt for the Locus Gear poles (+20g) over the GG poles for the added strength and external adjustment, whereas now you can get that while weighing less.

    We are going to make them available as singles for our second batch. Right now the first batch is almost sold out so we’re keeping it simple but starting later this year with the second batch we’ll have more options.

    These poles look almost perfect but for one omittance…the lack of an extended grip.
    Grips are a tough one because there are so many different preferences (strap? foam or cork? extended?). For this first version I opted for the lightest configuration (regular EVA foam grip) but we’ll add a strap option for the second batch, and then further off we could add a ‘luxury’ grip that is cork with an extension.

    Looks like a great pole. Improved the weak/worst part of a GG pole(thin, weak bottom section). Though the lack of at least a tiny basket is strange….maybe they are compatible with most baskets?
    The rationale is that most hikers don’t need baskets. They add weight and can get snagged on brush. If we include them, then most baskets would either (1) go to waste, or (2) used by people who don’t need to. Plus everyone has different needs with some wanting small baskets and others large baskets. So I opted to only add the basket connector piece and then people who want baskets can add whichever size they prefer.

    I’m not able to find how much adjustment range the Iceline poles provide. BD Distance Carbon FLZ’s have 15 cm of range on all 3 sizes…Actually they have much in common with the Iceline in that the FLZ.
    The Iceline poles have about double the adjustment range. They can adjust from 95 – 127 cm, so there is no need for a bunch of sizes like the BD poles.

    The BD Distance Carbon FLZ is an interesting comparison. A key difference is that the BD poles are optimized for running, while the Iceline’s are optimized for hiking. So the BD poles have a 4 section design with an internal cord that adds weight but enables that rapid deployment that runners want. The Icelines using stronger tubing (16mm vs 12mm for the lower sections) and yet are quite a bit lighter due to having few sections (3) and no internal cord.

    The collapsed size of the Iceline poles (49 cm) is very good for a 3 piece pole, as most collapse closer to 60 cm. The Iceline’s collapse similar to some 4 piece poles (e.g. the Fizan Compact 4 is also 49 cm), but yes the BD 4 piece poles are extremely short at 42 cm due to the limited adjustment range/limited max height.

    So the BD poles win for rapid deployment and packed size, while the Iceline’s win on weight, adjustment range, and strength.

    #3812467
    Charlie Brenneman
    BPL Member

    @cwbrenneman

    Locale: Primarily Desolation Wilderness, Yosemite, and SEKI

    I’m assuming the 131cm max height on the Z-Flick tent poles was to make them universal, but the 127cm max height was to stay the world’s lightest and because that is the most an X-Mid (or most non pyramid trekking pole tents) would ever go up to?

    #3812473
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    The primary purpose of the Z-Flick poles is to support shelters, so I wanted to make them long enough to support all dual pole shelters. Some single pole shelters are taller, but it didn’t make sense to add that much length (weight, packed size) when the vast majority of people are using them for dual pole shelters.

    Whereas with the Iceline poles the primary purpose is a trekking pole, so they should also work for supporting tents but not to the detriment of their function while walking. At 127 cm they’ll work for all of our tents and most others, and then if someone has a really tall 140 cm shelter, they can add a pole jack. I think it makes more sense to keep that extension separate, rather than make the pole excessively longer for trekking (adding weight and packed size). Basically, why add weight and packed size for everyone when an extension works almost just as well for the small % of people that needed it.

    #3812475
    Charlie Brenneman
    BPL Member

    @cwbrenneman

    Locale: Primarily Desolation Wilderness, Yosemite, and SEKI

    Totally agree. I have a fear of carbon poles when my shelter requires two trekking poles, or off trail travel, so I have 16.5oz BD aluminum ones for when I want max durability. I could see using the Iceline poles on trail or with my pyramid shelter and a pole jack as you suggest. The total weight would be 6.Xoz lighter and if one did break one I’d still have a backup. I really like the idea of a pole with just one adjustment point, and I do appreciate the lack of straps or baskets. They always get taken off and just sit in a box in my closet.

    #3812523
    Rob
    BPL Member

    @grubbster

    Dan, will the current poles be able to be retrofitted with the straps once that design comes out, or will that be a completely redesigned handle?

    #3812536
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    https://www.rei.com/product/799630/pmi-3mm-utility-cord-package-of-50-ft?sku=7996300047&store=&CAWELAID=120217890000795411&CAGPS

    this. if you use your straps primarily in situations when they might fall far away off a cliff, etc.: this works well. And it’s very very light.

    #3812557
    Dan @ Durston Gear
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    “will the current poles be able to be retrofitted with the straps once that design comes out, or will that be a completely redesigned handle?”

    No it won’t be retrofittable. A strap requires an anchor point inside the handle, so the best way to add a strap would be to swap the handles (any mod that could add them would be much more difficult). There are numerous handles available now that fit onto an 18mm shaft, so this is pretty easy to do currently if someone wishes. You would boil the original handle, twist it off, and glue on the new handle.

    #3812561
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    Do you have a ‘cutaway’ diagram of the current handle/shaft interface? Is the upper tube section capped inside the handle?

    #3812568
    Diane “Piper” Soini
    BPL Member

    @sbhikes

    Locale: Santa Barbara

    I’m a person who doesn’t use straps. I don’t think it’s necessary. My Gossamer Gear poles didn’t have straps. I removed the straps from my CMT trekking poles. I only need the poles to keep from falling when I slip, to have stability crossing creeks and things like that. I’m not doing any kind of Nordic walking or whatever.

    #3812570
    Gene C
    BPL Member

    @genecx

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    With all due respect to the people who are posting that *you* don’t need straps, we know!  There are plenty of people who don’t use straps.  That’s not in question.   Go ahead and buy Dan’s nice new poles. I started this thread to let Dan know that for a substantial part of the lightweight hiking population, straps are a fundamental part of how we use poles.

    I look forward to the strapped version of these poles coming out!

     

    #3812572
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    Plenty to choose from with straps. It’s good to hear another point of view.

    #3812580
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    By “you” the posters mean ‘one’. “One doesn’t need straps.” Better? It’s not addressed to anyone in particular or a group of people. The problem is, writing “one doesn’t need straps” etc. sounds a bit high falutin’. Still, in a forum like this, I’ve found that using the impersonal ‘one’ avoids possible conflict. the person who posted just before me may think my use of ‘y0u’ is directed at him or her or them or they, when it’s just meant generically: “you don’t need to be afraid of bears”  is addressed to everyone around a campfire, not just the last kid who happened to speak. It’s more familiar than  saying, “one doesn’t need  to be afraid of bears.” No one is lecturing,  we’re just using everyday language. If one doesn’t like using straps, fine!

    I can’t stop you from making wrong choices. (see what I just did there? It’s a joke!)

     

Viewing 25 posts - 51 through 75 (of 103 total)
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