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Vargo Titanium Water Bottle Review


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Vargo Titanium Water Bottle Review

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #3727073
    Andrew Marshall
    Moderator

    @andrewsmarshall

    Locale: Tahoe basin by way of the southern Appalachians

    Companion forum thread to: Vargo Titanium Water Bottle Review

    I bought the $85 Vargo titanium water bottle to see if it was worth it. The answer? It’s complicated. Here’s my review.

    #3727076
    Jon Fong
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    Just curious, why not use the BOT?  It can hold water and be used as a pot.

    #3727078
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    The thing I don’t like about the Bot as a water bottle is that it’s as fat as a 1L nalgene and harder to stow and access. I really like the idea of skinny lower capacity bottles like this combined with soft bottles for more storage if/when needed.

    #3727115
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    I find that titanium has a taste. Not terribly bad, but not what I want my water to taste like…

    #3727117
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    Holy Toledo.  I don’t need to do a review–or read someone else’s–to give my conclusion.

    I’m still using Gatorade bottles I repurposed in 2008.  So apart from enviro-virtue signaling, what else would I get for my $170?

    #3727119
    Eli Simmer
    BPL Member

    @patchessobo

    How’s the slight unscrew trickle pour for butt cleaning performance?

    #3727123
    baja bob
    BPL Member

    @bajabob

    Locale: West

    Just don’t lose it.

    #3727124
    rubmybelly!
    BPL Member

    @sleeping

    Locale: The Cascades

    What made you decide to choose the Vargo bottle? I’ve used a Keith Titanium 700ml bottle for a few years now, it was much less than the Vargo. And it comes with the neoprene sleeve instead of that being an extra cost.

    I find Vargo titanium overpriced compared to other titanium offerings.

    #3727137
    Marcus
    BPL Member

    @mcimes

    #3727186
    karl hafner
    BPL Member

    @khafner

    Locale: upstate NY

    I had the titanium BOT but got rid of it.  Every time you would change altitude or your hot liquids would cool off you could not get the top off.  They recommend using a credit card to break the suction seal.  Who wants to carry a CC or destroy it trying to break a suction seal?  The titanium cap on a titanium bottle had enough friction that if you created a pressure differential it was impossible to unscrew the cap.  I had to even stop at a house and request a screwdriver one day to get it off.  This was not a piece of gear I could trust my life with.  Was a great idea water bottle and cook pot.  I believe that using a different material (plastic) for the cap may solve the problem.

    #3727265
    Bonzo
    BPL Member

    @bon-zo

    Locale: Virgo Supercluster

    Interesting idea, but yeah…expensive. I would have to be very sure of the benefit before committing to the number of bottles I would need to supply my water needs.  My average hot-weather, five-hour dayhike would require three of these.

    So apart from enviro-virtue signaling, what else would I get for my $170?

    This is a genuine question on my part: how does one virtue-signal with a water bottle?  I honestly can’t think of a method other than walking up to a person with a plastic water bottle and saying “You know, you really shouldn’t be using that”…but that method doesn’t signal any sort of virtue: it just signals that you’re a complete ass.

    I honestly don’t know that I’ve ever paid a great deal of attention to someone else’s water bottle…except for this one kid that had a plastic bottle with dinosaurs on it, which I immediately wanted as soon as I saw it, because dinosaurs.

    #3727268
    Gary Dunckel
    BPL Member

    @zia-grill-guy

    Locale: Boulder

    I am with Todd about the Gatorade bottles. They are nearly indestructible. Another durable water container is the under-appreciated parmesan cheese container. You need to find a screw top lid for it, but there are several that work for them.

    Lately I’ve been geeking out making cuben fiber insulated water bottle holders to give to friends for Christmas gifts. ( I still call it “cuben” because that’s what it was called when I last bought a few yards of it from Z-Packs several years ago.) The bottles that I am including are aluminum ones such as Brita (18 fl. oz.), which can be infinitely re-filled, as long as you don’t step on them when they’re empty. Being aluminum, they can also be used to heat up some water for tea.  The 2-cup capacity is plenty for my 2+ hour jaunts through my nearby open space.

    I also picked up a Bot when they were selling at a discount early on at MassDrop. Karl was right on about how the lid can be REALLY hard to unscrew once things cool down. It took me 1/2 an hour to get it off, breaking a couple of finger nails in the process. I won’t take it hiking anymore, but I still think that it’s a unique piece of kit.

     

    #3727287
    Dustin V
    BPL Member

    @dustinv

    I’ve been looking at these things for awhile because I’d love to be able to boil water in a bottle on quick overnights and save the space of a pot. Outside of the cost, what stops me is that there isn’t a drink lid available. My other metal bottles have drink lids, so not having one is kind of a non-starter.

    Has anyone found a drink lid that will work for this bottle? Either straw- or bike-bottle lid.

    #3727291
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    Bonzo: the virtue signaling can be real even if it is only ever in the purchaser’s mind.  I definitely see folks spending $12 on a high-end plastic bottle imagining how very many disposable water bottles they won’t use and then going for the $30 SS one that involves no plastic and is therefore morally superior.

    All of which ignores the greater amount of energy that went into the heavy plastic much less the smelting and processing of the iron, nickel and chromium ore.

    Often, long before it has really displaced its energy-equivalent in disposable plastic bottles, it’s been left on the car roof or trail and lost or left with a drink residue inside for weeks and gotten too funky for future use.

    Whereas I dumpster dive for not the crinkly PEET bottle, but the name-brand PEET soda or water bottles, use them dozens of times and toss them back in the recycling bin when they get bunged up or funky.  So there’s ZERO impact to my choice of water bottle although I earn no eco-cred for that – I’m just known as being a cheap bastard.

    #3727292
    Arthur
    BPL Member

    @art-r

    David. In the parched SW, we need to consider the amount of soap water it takes to clean out your dumpster bottles. That also applies to cleaning out food from plastic in order to recycle it. Which is worse here, plastic in the dump or wasting precious water to clean the plastic? Good question.

    #3727301
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Ti water bottles for mega-dollars.
    Amazing stuff!
    The ‘benefits’ of extreme marketing are clear. Benefits to the vendor at least.
    Me, I use 1.25 L rocket-base PET mineral water bottle, thus:

    They are totally free (after drinking the fizzy mineral water), they last for years, they don’t leak, and they survive extremely rough treatment, like being dropped off cliffs. (A deliberate test.) And they come quite clean after use too.

    Cheers

    #3727303
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Changes Often

    I can’t understand why titanium would be any better than aluminum for this application. Of course aluminum is much much cheaper and if I’m not mistaken it is slightly lighter than titanium on a per volume basis.

    I do like the idea of a metal water bottle in cold, freezing environments though because if the contents freeze I can place it near a flame and melt what’s inside. Can’t do that with plastic.

    Take this $8.42 Sigg aluminum 1 liter bottle on Amazon for example. Why would it be inferior to titanium. It weighs 146 gm, however it also has .4L more volume than the Vargo, so that makes the weight comparable. I understand the utility and advantages of titanium over aluminum for many uses, but someone please explain what would make titanium any better for a water bottle.

     

    #3727304
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    I can’t understand why titanium would be any better than aluminum for this application. Of course aluminum is much much cheaper and if I’m not mistaken it is slightly lighter than titanium on a per volume basis.

    I do like the idea of a metal water bottle in cold, freezing environments though because if the contents freeze I can place it near a flame and melt what’s inside. Can’t do that with plastic.

    Take this $8.42 Sigg aluminum 1 liter bottle on Amazon for example. Why would it be inferior to titanium. It weighs 146 gm, however it also has .4L more volume than the Vargo, so that makes the weight comparable. I understand the utility and advantages of titanium over aluminum for many uses, but someone please explain what would make titanium any better for a water bottle.

    I agree.

    #3727387
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    I do like the idea of a metal water bottle in cold, freezing environments though because if the contents freeze I can place it near a flame and melt what’s inside. Can’t do that with plastic.

    I am not sure, but I seem to remember reading a few years back that Sigg bottles have some sort of lining or coating. I am not sure whether they still do and what the result of applying heat is…

    #3727390
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    A quick search on the web brought this up:

    The classic, durable water bottles are considered almost unbreakable and are made from a single piece of aluminum, with no seams. They have an EcoCare liner to ensure no metallic aftertaste. Water tastes fresh and clean, and the high-performance lining does not transfer, absorb, or leach odors or flavors. The internal coating is resistant to almost all beverages, including carbonated drinks, energy drinks, fruit juice acids, and alcohol.

    Sigg water bottles have been tested and are certified to not contain harmful chemicals. These BPA-free bottles do not have any volatile organic compounds or phthalates. They also meet European and American regulatory requirements.

    My oldest SIGG water bottle, dating from the 1950s and bought in Switzerland, currently serves as a fuel bottle for my chain saws. It is still going strong, still has a good seal, but is too heavy for backpacking.

    Cheers

     

    #3727419
    Andrew Marshall
    Moderator

    @andrewsmarshall

    Locale: Tahoe basin by way of the southern Appalachians

    I feel like many of the comments/questions in this post about virtue signaling – and price – and the nuances behind environmental decisions – I addressed in my essay that precedes the review. But as always I appreciate people reading. Somebody somewhere is buying these things, and based on my use it isn’t just BECAUSE they are expensive and/or sexy. But as I said a few times, your mileage will vary.

    #3727423
    Jon Fong
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    Andrew, I think that your article was well written, and you laid out the premises very well.  Even with all the caveats, I think that the knee jerk reaction was the disparity between the cost of a Smart Water Bottle and the Titanium Bottle.   The Vargo Bottle is not for everyone, but it has a purpose.  One could say similar things about DCF tents (or for that matter stuck sacks!).  Not in my budget and not something that I foresee using in the near future, but someone likes them.  To each there own (or HYOH considering this a backpacking forum)

    #3727429
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Changes Often

    Thanks lago and Roger for pointing out the inner liner of the Sigg Aluminum water bottle. I wasn’t aware, but I did notice other aluminum water bottles such as those by Luken also have a “polyamide based inner coating”. Definitely not good to put a flame to a bottle like that, however, I do believe there are other aluminum bottles which don’t have the inner coating such as the SJR 750 ml aluminum. Weighs 139 gm so it’s 5.39 ml volume per 1 gm of weight, whereas the 650 ml Vargo titanium at 111 gm comes out to 5.85 ml per 1 gm weight, so the weights are pretty close really with the aluminum providing only 15% less volume per weight than the titanium. The SJS aluminum cost way way less though at under $7. And I’m not sure if the listed weight on the SJR 750 includes the carabiner.

    Andrew, as far as price, the way I see it is if someone has the funds to buy something more power to them. I never saw the purchase as you trying to impress anyone with the price tag…not at all. No virtue signaling or anything else. If you can melt frozen water in the ti bottle (with flame) and also heat up water in it then I think it’s a great buy. I always say that the only expensive gear is the gear you don’t use. The Vargo ti bottle looks very nice really.

    SJR 750 ml aluminum

     

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