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Upright Canister Stove Reviews, StoveBench Tests, and Gear Guide


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Upright Canister Stove Reviews, StoveBench Tests, and Gear Guide

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 146 total)
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  • #3593371
    steven koester
    BPL Member

    @skoescomcast-net

    Great report that required many hours of testing. This is why I read and subscribe to BPL –  keep up the good work.

    Steven Koester

    #3593453
    David C. Menges
    BPL Member

    @davidmenges

    MSR customer service says “The MSR PocketRocket Deluxe Stove can nest inside the MSR Titan Kettle.”.  I wonder who is right.

    #3593454
    Patrick Podenski
    BPL Member

    @patpodenski

    The MSR statement doesn’t say whether the 4 oz gas canister also fits in the Titan Kettle with the PR Deluxe …

    #3593473
    David C. Menges
    BPL Member

    @davidmenges

    Oh, I didn’t catch that BPL’s test was to store both stove and canister in pot.  I store canister outside pot (rest of kitchen in pot, including a Snow Peak stove).  MSR’s full response implies that both do fit.

    I asked “Will a Pocket Rocket Deluxe stove fit inside a Titan Tea Kettle pot (without any plastic case)?”.  They replied “The MSR PocketRocket Deluxe Stove can nest inside the MSR Titan Kettle. You can also fit a 4.0 oz IsoPro canister in with the stove if you place the canister sideways with the Lindal valve facing the side of the pot first.”.  Note I specified the Tea Kettle (.85 liter); their reply didn’t, but I assume they don’t mean the larger Big Titan Kettle (2 liters).

    I might upgrade to the PR Deluxe; it’s sounding like stove + kitchen – canister will fit in .85 liter pot.

    #3593739
    Jenny A
    BPL Member

    @jennifera

    Locale: Front Range

    Very nice review, pretty comprehensive.  I own several of these and have settled on the Windmaster as the current favorite – bought it before the new PR Deluxe came out.  Might have to get one of those at some point.  I am blown away by the amazing choices available to us and that we have the luxury of splitting so many hairs.

    #3594200
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    I thought the criticism of some stoves over the wind performance was questionable. I always use a good windscreen which comes some way up the side of the pot, partly as a windshield but also because it improves the efficiency of the heat transfer. So wind resistance does not matter at all to me.

    And yes, I have different windshields for upright and remote canister stoves, as they have different heights.

    I think you will find that peak stove power is almost entirely controlled by the size of the jet. They can range from <0.27 mm to >30 mm. The bigger the jet, the more flow and higher power. That said, I would not recommend trying to change the size of the jet. But I never run anywhere over about 50% peak, as the higher powers lose efficiency fast. The flames go up the side of the pot and are wasted.

    For CO testing, see our 6 part series from 2005, starting at https://backpackinglight.com/stoves_tents_carbon_monoxide/

    And my BRS-3000T stoves (I have several) are all from the good batch. I love them. Seems a real shame they changed the alloy to something which melts. Noise? It just says ‘dinner is coming’.

    Cheers

    #3594452
    Kristoffer Fredriksson
    BPL Member

    @rullgrus

    Since it is impossible to have too many stoves I picked up the Pocketrocket 2. It’s a giant next to the BRS-3000T! I personally haven’t had any issues with the BRS and I’ve been using it a lot since 2015.

    I noticed that the Pocketrocket 2 uses screws for the supports and to attach the stack to the valve assembly. I guess that this is to facilitate easier service or replacement of some parts? Anyone had issues with them unscrewing?

    #3594567
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Regarding fitting the MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe inside the Titan Kettle with a 4 oz canister: no matter what direction you put the canister (bottom down, or sideways), with the stove inside, you can’t snugly close the pot lid.

    Kristoffer – I’ve never had one of the screws come undone on the MSR stoves by accident, but on my PR2 which has seen a lot of hard use, I have tightened one of them up as part of routine cleaning / maintenance. I have taken them apart just for fun.

    #3594755
    Kristoffer Fredriksson
    BPL Member

    @rullgrus

    Thanks for the information Ryan.

    I have found some reports online of problems with the stack and valve assembly becoming loose. However, it may be fixed by MSR with a new revision of the stove – the one I just bought has 3 screws but on a lot of pictures and in videos the stove only has 2.

    Not expecting any issues, but I guess that it’s good practice to check the screws before a trip.

    #3595097
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    #3595465
    Gary Dunckel
    BPL Member

    @zia-grill-guy

    Locale: Boulder

    I’m confused about that gizmo, Dan. Is it something you would take when truck camping? I always weigh my canisters with my gram kitchen scale before and after each trip, and I note the amount of remaining fuel on the bottom of the can. I suppose it would be nice if the goal is to own one of everything Jetboil sells, but otherwise…

    #3595478
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    Don’t be confused, just dumped it here for giggles. Lots of toys out there. :-)

    #3595494
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    I am with Gary and Dan.

    Cheers

    #3595661
    David Wiese
    BPL Member

    @dtothewiese

    My questions on page one were forgotten:

    Why does the Amicus have its weight listed as a disadvantage, but the PR Deluxe (which weighs more) does not?
    <div class=”bbp-reply-content”>

    And why use the heavier 4-pot stand version of the Windmaster instead of the triflex? Seems that would be a more direct comparison.

    </div>

    #3595758
    Patrick Podenski
    BPL Member

    @patpodenski

    With regards to the Compactibility Test, I wonder if the Pocket Rocket Deluxe in the MSR Titan pot should have been an ‘almost fits’. I tried a different arrangement wherein the canister is on its side and both canister and stove fit in the Titan pot except the canister protrudes just a bit.

    In any event, I opted for the Toaks 750 ml pot which fits both canister and stove quite nicely.

    Photos of MSR Titan + Pocket Rocket Deluxe included in this post.

    IMG_5464

    IMG_5465

    IMG_5466

    #3596241
    David B
    BPL Member

    @dbesen

    Two things —

    First, the Fire Maple FMS-116t’s weight is listed incorrectly in the summary table (it’s listed as 3.55 and should be 1.7).

    Second, howcome the FMS-116t got the “best performance for its weight” award when the FMS-300t got a higher score and weighs less?

    #3596243
    David Wiese
    BPL Member

    @dtothewiese

    David B- There’s some fishiness going on with the reviews. See my concerns posted on pg 1 and re-posted further up this page.

    I certainly hope it doesn’t have to do with any sort of agreement made between MSR and BPL with respect to receiving a review unit. It’s hard to find other explanations, though.

    #3596244
    David B
    BPL Member

    @dbesen

    David W- I’m more inclined to guess honest mistakes than foul play.  Hanlon’s Razor, and all that.  And MSR has been making really excellent stoves for many years, surely there would be no need for them to buy a good review.

    #3596255
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    MSR has been making really excellent stoves for many years
    Like the Reactor, with its lethal levels of CO, and the original Pocket Rocket, with its weak bendy pot supports …
    They WERE good, until Larry, the founder died, then the lawyers and accountants took over.

    Imho.
    Cheers

    #3596546
    David B
    BPL Member

    @dbesen

    To answer my own question, the FMS-300t probably didn’t get the best performance for weight award since it failed the large volume test.

    #3596859
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    Here is a quote from the Upright Canister Stove Reviews, Stovebench Tests, and Gear Guide.

     

    “The BRS 3000t is impossibly small and impossibly light and actually performs fairly well (its overall StoveBench score is only slightly below average). But this stove has a long history of malfunction.

    The problem is that the pot supports simply don’t hold up under extended heat (due to poorly hardened metal parts). We’d heard anecdotal evidence (we suggest you read our extensive forum conversationsabout this stove) but didn’t want to believe it until we replicated the malfunction ourselves. The pot supports on our first sample melted. And the pot supports on our second sample melted. In fact, the pot supports on 4 of 7 of our samples melted. Yes, we were so curious about this that we purchased 7 of them. You’re welcome.”

    I’ve recently been doing extended burn time (15 min) tests with the BRS 3000 and there has been no indication that the titanium supports will even begin to “melt”

    I would truly like to see some photos of your “melted” supports from the 4 that failed. What did your supplier say when you informed them of the 4 that had melting failures? Thank you in advance.

     

    #3596862
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    The originals had titanium pot support arms, and they were reliable. I have used one for years. It sounds as though BRS have changed the metal used to something cheaper. Sad.

    Cheers

    #3596864
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    Even if they used cheaper metal, I don’t envision a canister stove melting a pot support.

    Ryan reported 4 out of seven “melting”

    “The BRS 3000t is impossibly small and impossibly light and actually performs fairly well (its overall StoveBench score is only slightly below average). But this stove has a long history of malfunction.

    The problem is that the pot supports simply don’t hold up under extended heat (due to poorly hardened metal parts). We’d heard anecdotal evidence (we suggest you read our extensive forum conversationsabout this stove) but didn’t want to believe it until we replicated the malfunction ourselves. The pot supports on our first sample melted. And the pot supports on our second sample melted. In fact, the pot supports on 4 of 7 of our samples melted. Yes, we were so curious about this that we purchased 7 of them. You’re welcome.”

    #3596879
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Even if they used cheaper metal, I don’t envision a canister stove melting a pot support.

    Here I have to disagree with you. I am currently testing some new stove designs, and I am finding that it is quite possible to melt some metals with the flames from a canister stove.

    I will quote from sciencing.com:

    While propane-oxygen combinations can reach a maximum temperature of 3,623 degrees F, or 1,995 degrees C, a propane-butane torch only goes up to 2237 degrees F, 1225 degrees C.

    Ignore the 1995 C figures: that is for a propane/oxygen mix, not for a propane/air mix. We must use the second set of figures. We all know what has happened to the heat exchanger fins on some Jetboil pots, don’t we? Yeah, they melted.

    Now Ti 6Al4V alloy has a melting point of about 1900 C, which is a lot hotter than 1225 C. But pure titanium (CP) is not as good as that: it is only about 1668 C. The alloying improves things for pots and aerospace.

    However, while Ti is wonderful, that is not the full story. When Ti gets red hot (I think that is about 800 C) it enters a ‘super-plastic’ phase, where it can bend, deform and flow quite well. That is how you shape high-strength Ti alloys: at red heat. I have done this myself a number of times.

    In fact, the ‘maximum service temperature’ for Ti 6Al4V is as low as about 650 C. This is in the region of what is conventionally called ‘red heat’, which is 500 – 790 C. That is easily reached with a propane torch.

    There is a secondary factor here. Ti 6Al4V alloy is expensive, but ‘CP: commercial purity’ Ti, is not as expensive. It is also a LOT easier to form or shape. Bend sheet 6Al4V cold and it will likely crack; bend CP Ti cold and it will bend nicely. Been there, done a lot of that!

    You may be able now to see what I am suggesting. Some silly manager at BRS decided that they could use a cheaper version of titanium, and one that is easier to work, and get away with it. A brilliant bit of management innovation, but with very sad results.

    Cheers
    PS: and aluminium pot supports are especially dicey!

    #3596895
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Yeah, it is not so much of an actual melt (it doesn’t just turn into a blob of metal,) it deforms badly while pretty much retaining it’s overall shape…  Yes, aluminum is not real good at pot stands!

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 146 total)
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