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The HydraPak Flux 1L – A Smartwater Bottle Replacement?


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable The HydraPak Flux 1L – A Smartwater Bottle Replacement?

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 27 total)
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  • #3677486
    Andrew Marshall
    Moderator

    @andrewsmarshall

    Locale: Tahoe basin by way of the southern Appalachians

    Companion forum thread to: The HydraPak Flux 1L – A Smartwater Bottle Replacement?

    The HydraPak Flux 1 L (2.7 oz / 77 g, MSRP $20) is a soft-sided, collapsible, 42 mm threaded, reusable water-bottle aimed at the single-use Smartwater or sports-drink bottle crowd.

    #3677489
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    $20 will buy a case of Smartwater bottles that are rigid, have a one handed flip top. The top fits a Sqeeze filter

    And come filled with water.

    #3677502
    Greg Pehrson
    BPL Member

    @gregpehrson

    Locale: playa del caballo blanco

    I think, in terms of sustainability, it’s also important to consider where a product goes at the inevitable end of its life. Are all the parts of the HydraPak Flux easily recyclable? It doesn’t seem like they would be due to the mix of materials. A Smartwater bottle or Gatorade bottle is 100% recyclable (bottle and lid) at the end of its life, but I realize that ultralight backpackers who reuse these bottles are a minuscule fraction of the consumers of them, most of whom don’t recycle the bottles. I’ve been gravitating more these days to leaving my trusty Gatorade bottles behind and using the white HDPE Nalgene bottles which are light, indestructible (I had one for thirty years before I donated it here on BPL for use at a vet’s office), and as recyclable (#2) as a milk jug (are the lids? I don’t see any recycling numbers on them). I can use them through all four seasons. I can use them as my daily water bottle at work, even in the winter when I bring hot water. Plus, they’re easy to get in and out of backpack pockets, as you can hook them by the lid loop. To me, a collapsible bottle that doesn’t play well with backpack pockets means I don’t drink nearly enough water because it’s inconvenient.

    #3677503
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    I use Platypus collapsable bottles for water storage and 1 rigid smartwater bottle for drinking during the day.  The Platys last forever and the Smartwater bottle gets recycled when it is worn out.

    I really don’t see water bottles as an area in need of innovation.  There seem so many better places to spend research time and money…clothing systems that can actually keep you dry without overheating and/or developing condensation are just one example.

    #3677506
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    “I really don’t see water bottles as an area in need of innovation. ”

    +1

    #3677530
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    Locale: California

    Plastic recycling in the U.S. is mostly a failure – except for ♳ #1 PET/PETE beverage bottles like Smartwater and ♴ #2, mostly milk jugs. More plastics are burned each year than recycled:


    Source: EPA

    “The current U.S. recycling rate for PET is just under 30%, with much of this material coming from applications other than [♳ #1] bottles.” Food Packaging Forum

    Despite 50+ years of misleading advertising and recycling symbology, truly recycling any kind of plastic (e.g. bottles to bottles)  is technically very, very hard for many reasons. Mostly they get made into other products which are not currently recycled.

    If you use Smartwater bottles, remove the caps and make sure they go into a recycling bin at the end.

    “Mixed” plastics like the Hydrapack bottle with “Dual-layer film laminate construction” are currently impossible to recycle – they go into the trash.

    Choose your sins carefully.

    — Rex

    #3677550
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    https://www.npr.org/2020/09/11/912150085/waste-land

    Found that article very interested. I didn’t realize the situation was that bad…

    #3677551
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    Use a combo of Smartwater and white wide mouth Nalgene.

    #3677583
    Adam Kilpatrick
    BPL Member

    @oysters

    Locale: South Australia

    I’ve been eyeing this off…I’ve found I’ve loved my collapsible bottles in my UD vest lately for Rogaining…great for gatorade upfront, easy to use while moving, comfortable running, etc. While I run a 2L hosed bladder in the back with water, I really need more volume up front though… 2x500ml doesnt cut it. I can’t see a physical reason though why 1L flex bottles couldn’t be put in a vest with long enough bottle pockets to take them. Just need to find the right vest…

    #3677593
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    If you use Smartwater bottles, remove the caps and make sure they go into a recycling bin at the end.

    “Mixed” plastics like the Hydrapack bottle with “Dual-layer film laminate construction” are currently impossible to recycle – they go into the trash.

    Choose your sins carefully.

    Thanks for your input Rex and iago. Very enlightening, and troubling.  Glad to see the Smartwater bottles are of a material that may actually get recycled into something else.  Precisely why I use what I use…my platys are probably 10 years old and going strong.  The best way to “recycle” is to not have to throw it away!  Come to think of it, my smartwater bottles are several years old as well.

    #3677634
    dirtbag
    BPL Member

    @dirtbaghiker

    I like it. Its compatible with my be free filter. When its empty it crushes down good enough to take less space. I love that it stands on its own.. Full or empty. I can also use my steripen in it if needed .

    #3677669
    Harv
    BPL Member

    @hrk

    I have found Evernew bottles to be lightweight and reliable.  I use them with a tube and bite-valve for drinking while hiking.  In camp they stand upright.  900 ml rated at 1.0 oz.  1.5l at 1.3 oz.  2l at 1.5 oz.  I started decades ago with Nalgene hard plastic bottles then migrated to Nalgene collapsible bottles.  Nalgene collapsible bottles were not reliable – developed leaks.

    http://evernew-global.com/products/waterstorage/index.html

    #3677690
    HL Chen
    BPL Member

    @mellowyellowhc

    Hydrapak bottles & reservoirs (2L Seeker) may not be recyclable, but they can be repaired with seamgrip wp or similar sealers.  I’ve owned mine for 2+ years and just recently developed 2 tiny pinholes which were easily  sealed.

    #3677693
    Cameron M
    BPL Member

    @cameronm-aka-backstroke

    Locale: Los Angeles

    My beater Smartwater bottle is a source of pride…

    #3677694
    John R.
    BPL Member

    @jpriddle

    Honest question: why do backpackers/hikers recycle their disposable water bottles so frequently? I’m on my same collection (2x 700ml/1L/1.5) for the past three years and they’re still doing fine. I watch other hikers buy new ones and throw them away/recycle them after a single hike. That’s not keeping them out of landfills.

    #3677702
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    Locale: California

    @jpriddle: I’ve recycled Smartwater bottles for two reasons.

    At some point they get enough white-line “creases” from repeated squeezing/flexing/dropping to trust that they won’t fail in the backcountry.

    And depending on water quality, what I’ve been eating, and “unknown unknowns,” eventually they get a pretty funky smell that screams “unsafe” to me. And I have a pretty tolerant nose.

    A bottle usually lasts several months of weekly day hikes and much-less-frequent backpacking trips. The cost of replacement is low enough, and the promise of recycling sold well enough, that replacement seems reasonable.

    I might reconsider that approach.

    — Rex

    #3677719
    Ben C
    BPL Member

    @alexdrewreed

    Locale: Kentucky

    As long as people are throwing away thousands of water bottles every day, it’s hard to see that the purchase of a bottle vs. using a bottle that was heading to the dumpster is a net positive, environmentally. That said, I like the bottle and have used a similar one from them because it fit my UV water treatment pen well. Thanks for reviewing.

    #3677749
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    “The single raindrop never feels responsible for the flood.”

    #3677771
    Michael B
    BPL Member

    @mikebergy

    So, is the reviewer using this as a dirty bottle or a clean bottle? I read that the pros are that the bottle is stiff enough to stand up on its own, and has a bail handle, so I assume dirty bottle, but then it says the 1L is the wrong thread size for a squeeze filter, and you have to go down a size for the smaller BeFree filter compatibility. If you have to use a pump filter or an adapter with the bigger bottles, is the only advantage of this bottle over a regular BeFree bottle its ability to stand up on its own? I am not sold on the form factor, the problems it proposes to solve, or the weight. I’ll keep using my smart water bottles, sawyer bags, and my bladder/gravity setups, all which have served me for many miles and hundreds of gallons of water. I have been on the same 3 smart water bottles for the last 3 years. I use them every day, whether hiking or going to work. I guess they might get gross someday, but they are easy enough to clean given the fact only water goes in them.

    #3677775
    Bill F
    BPL Member

    @fournwi

    Have traditionally used a 1Q Gatorade bottle as it’s squat, stable, durable and has a wider mouth.  But agree with Rex that after a year, regardless of washing and disinfecting with water & bleach, just cannot get the funky smell out of them.  But this year switching to an ULA Catalyst made the reach back to grab it impossible vs my old pack (+ old shoulders).  Also acquired a Hydrapak 2L Seeker resevoir as water storage but also as back up in case my Be Free squeeze bag springs a leak.   This might be a better long term solution if it will fit in the Catalyst’s shock cord bottle holders on my pack strap while also serving double duty as a back up dirty bag for the Be Free.  I can then go back to the more compact and lighter platy bags if I need to store water.  Thanks for the review.

    #3677853
    Craig B
    BPL Member

    @kurogane

    +1 for using the ‘single use’ smartwater type bottle.  I’ve got 3 of them that I’ve used for several years as well.  Lighter and cheaper than the reviewed bottle, and not buying something new made out of plastic is good.

    I’d rather re-think my bottle storage system entirely (and possibly commission a backpack with soft-sided bottles in mind) than continue to use single-use plastics.

    I find this sentiment a little odd.  You’d like to give up single use plastics so your solution is to consume a bunch more plastic in the form of a new backpack and more water bottles rather than re-use existing single-use bottles?  Please elaborate how this is more environmentally friendly….

    #3678255
    Jason Brooks
    BPL Member

    @drytool

    My biggest concern about single use plastic bottles is that people use them for months or years at a time when they are actually only meant to be used once. Over time they leach more and more toxic chemicals into one’s water. [edited – MK]

    #3678260
    William Chilton
    BPL Member

    @williamc3

    Locale: Antakya

    Over time they leach more and more toxic chemicals into one’s water.

    Is this true? A reused water bottle leaches chemicals faster than one on its first use? I.e. a reused bottle I filled with water the day before a trip will contain more leached chemical than a new one that has been sitting filled with water in a warehouse for a month? It seems doubtful to me.
    However, PET can breed bacteria, which might be a cause for concern for some people.

    #3678452
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    Locale: California

    So-called “biodegradable” containers are still mostly marketing hype.

    NYT: Why ‘Biodegradable’ Isn’t What You Think

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/10/01/climate/biodegradable-containers.html

    Relevant highlights:

    – PLA, made from corn and used in some bottles and single-use cutlery, can only be composted in special industrial facilities – not your backyard. PLA bottles look a lot like PET bottles, but can’t be recycled.

    – “Paper” bottles are really a multi-layer laminate that can’t be recycled or composted, like the Hydrapak. Oops.

    – PHA “has been the next big thing in biodegradability for years.” And it’s still too expensive to replace petroleum-based plastics. Especially as the market price of oil stays so low.

    — Rex

    #3678484
    Bill in Roswell
    BPL Member

    @roadscrape88-2

    Locale: Roswell, GA, USA

    I appreciate the review Andrew. There are a lot of benefits for using a Hydropak bottle.

     

    I’m also a big fan of Evernew water carry bottles. They can stand up empty or full and are very durable. I love the captive loop top cap. When empty, it rolls up and sits nicely next to my CNOC Vecto. I’m old with bad shoulders (25 years of martial arts) and have problems reaching back for a water bottle (depending on the pack) so like Harv, I rigged up a spare tube and mouthpiece from an old hydration system (could have bought the Evernew setup for same function). It screws onto any bottle with same thread pitch (Evernew uses the same pitch as Smartwater and other sportcap water bottles).

    Do modern Platy bottles still have a different thread pitch? I went to Evernew when the Sawyer Squeeze became popular (cuz the first gen Sawyer bags sucked).

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