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Philmont Adult Advisor Gear List Example – 11.5 pound base weight


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Home Forums Scouting Philmont Philmont Adult Advisor Gear List Example – 11.5 pound base weight

Viewing 10 posts - 26 through 35 (of 35 total)
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  • #3746594
    David Y
    BPL Member

    @moonshine

    Locale: Mid Tenn

    Oops, my typo on Mt Phillips elevation, 11,742 feet.

    #3746611
    Brad P
    Spectator

    @brawndo

    The temps can really vary and it’s impossible today to know what you’ll get on your trek. You could have a cool, wet trek or a mild, less wet (very unlikely to have no rain) trek. You also need to factor in if you’re a cold, warm or average sleeper.

    For those reasons, it’s safer to go with the 20 degree bag, particularly if that is a survival rating rather than comfort rating.

    I’ve told every crew member to have a lightweight puffy jacket. They should have that and their rain gear in the tent with them at night. So if they get cold, add layers.

    #3746665
    David Y
    BPL Member

    @moonshine

    Locale: Mid Tenn

    We usually have full crews of 12 so we use white gas stoves to boil water for supper for the full crew (Philmont style) more quickly (we do not eat individually). We like the MSR Dragonflies because they better support a 6 or 8-quart pot and are flame thrower stoves.

    We carry three 11-ounce MSR fuel bottles, two with pumps installed and wrapped with windscreens held by rubber bands and the third just capped. With three 11-ounce bottles we can spread the weight around and don’t have all our eggs in one basket. We never remove a pump from a fuel bottle unless its empty or to refill it, too much chance of spillage or loss.

    “Philmont should be enjoyed, not endured.” Moonshine

    #3746679
    Brad P
    Spectator

    @brawndo

    After seeing some of our scouts almost set a table on fire, I switched us from white gas to remote canister stoves. Much safer and no maintenance compared to white gas. You can’t spill canister fuel and there’s no maintenance. And our remote canister stoves are lighter.

    We don’t use them in winter and no problems at elevation.

    #3746680
    David Y
    BPL Member

    @moonshine

    Locale: Mid Tenn

     

    @ Brad P, Good point

    All stove operation should be the adult supervision (ASMs are expendable) but white gas is inherently more dangerous.

    “Philmont should be enjoyed, not endured.” Moonshine

    #3746703
    Bruce Tolley
    BPL Member

    @btolley

    Locale: San Francisco Bay Area

    @ Brad

    “The temps can really vary and it’s impossible today to know what you’ll get on your trek. You could have a cool, wet trek or a mild, less wet (very unlikely to have no rain) trek. You also need to factor in if you’re a cold, warm or average sleeper.”

    I am not sure these factors are any different from any other 7 day or longer backpacking trip that would be planned for the mountain West.  There are weather forecasts that would be good for the first week or so.  But by mid to late summer, at the highest camps in can get down to the mid 30s, while at many of the lower camps it might barely get down to the mid to high 50s. So if your itinerary includes one or two of the highest camps, you need to take a total sleep system to keep you warm for the expected lower temperatures.

    I slept just fine under a tarptent inside a 30 degree Marmot bag on Mt Phillips during an ice storm with a down sweater and clean dry base layer, sleeping on top of 2  pads with combined R value > 4.   But for most of the rest of the trek where we camped at lower elevations, I slept on top of the bag most of the time.

    I think the key is for the adult leaders (if not all members of the crews ) to know the limits of their sleeping systems before they get to Philmont.  This is a Backpacking Light forum after all. We are supposed to be learning and teaching how to take just enough to be safe while staying light.

    #3787600
    Chad J
    BPL Member

    @oldarmy04

    Was curious about why there were no camp shoes on the list. I also would love see your updated list.  thanks

    #3787601
    Parker
    BPL Member

    @rwparker35

    Locale: Columbus, OH

    Once I switched several years ago from hiking boots to trail runners, I ended up finding out that I just didn’t need camp shoes. For a while I used to carry them, and I have a variety of different kinds of camp shoes, but many times I would finish the trek and realize that I never really used them. What I tend to do is once we are at camp, I loosen the laces of my trail runners up and just walk around like that. Pretty comfy and let’s the feet breath a bit. Sometimes I also shed the wool socks and just have my liner socks on to let my feet breath even more. Lots of people bring camp shoes and there’s no problem with having them, I just found I never really needed them.

    I have lists for summer trek, autumn trek, and winter trek. They have varied over the years as I have cycled through gear. Send me a PM with your email address and I can send you whichever lists you would like to see.

    #3787622
    Parker
    BPL Member

    @rwparker35

    Locale: Columbus, OH

    So, my original post was from 2020 and I can no longer edit it to update the list I show in the first post. Since I put that first post up, I think I have done about 5 additional Philmont treks (a couple summer treks, a couple autumn treks, and one winter trek) and a bunch of non-Philmont treks near me in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia.

    What I use has obviously changed some. However, the general categories and amount of gear I carry has remained pretty much the same.

    I will post up an updated summer list in this post. I do have ones for autumn and winter. Just send me a PM if you want to see those.

    I also have a write-up on crew gear that I have provided to various groups heading out to Philmont over the years. Response has been pretty positive and people seem to appreciate the advice provided in it. If you want to see a copy of that, just send me a PM.

    Philmont Example Gear List

    #3787672
    Parker
    BPL Member

    @rwparker35

    Locale: Columbus, OH

    My mistake, I accidentally uploaded a summer packing list I used on a non-Philmont trip in my previous post. The daypack and eating bowl weren’t included. Philmont is the only time I carry an eating bowl. Every other trip I just eat out of the bag the food is prepared in.

    Anyway, here is the correct Philmont specific list:

Viewing 10 posts - 26 through 35 (of 35 total)
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