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Hummingbird Hammocks Reviews: Single, Single+, Pelican, Warbler, and Suspension System


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Hummingbird Hammocks Reviews: Single, Single+, Pelican, Warbler, and Suspension System

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #3550868
    Doug Johnson
    BPL Member

    @djohnson

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    Companion forum thread to: Hummingbird Hammocks Reviews: Single, Single+, Pelican, Warbler, and Suspension System

    Hummingbird Hammocks offers a variety of Made in the USA hammocks and accessories including three hammocks, two hammock tarps, a bug net, and other accessories. They have some unique features such as Button Links that eliminate the need for carabiners and integrated tree straps with whoopie slings which simplify the suspension system and make setup very easy. They also offer what is likely the lightest hammock on the market – the Single Hammock, which weighs a scant 5.6 oz. Can the lightest hammock also be the most comfortable?

    #3551024
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    Doug, I also love the button links. My wife uses the Single + and I use a Dutchware Netless hammock and a Simply Light model. One difference I have noticed is that the Dutch and Simply Light fabrics don’t stretch (I forget what fabric option I chose when I bought them). I have tried hammocks from half a dozen different manufacturers, and they had no stretch in the hammock fabric either.

    But I always feels a bit of stretch cuddling around the derriere area on the Single +. Not bad or anything. I kind of like it. But it’s different enough that I think it’s worth mentioning. May put some folks off???

    #3551058
    Kevin Babione
    BPL Member

    @kbabione

    Locale: Pennsylvania

    Thanks for comparing to the BIAS hammocks.  I have both the Weight Weenie and the Weight Weenie Micro and they are my go-to hammocks when I go out.  I’m a big guy (6′, 280 lbs) and the BIAS hammocks are the most comfortable I’ve found AND they’re room in the stuff sack for the suspension.

    I cannot fathom why Hummingbird would make their integrated stuff sack so small that it barely holds the hammock.  I guess it has to do with “shelf presence” – “Wow…Could that softball-sized package really be a full-sized hammock?”  The answer to that, unfortunately, is “No – You still need to carry a suspension elsewhere.”

    #3551146
    Doug Johnson
    BPL Member

    @djohnson

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    Thanks Kevin- a comprehensive BIAS (Butt In A Sling) hammock review is coming soon. 👍🏼

    #3551890
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    I don’t think I would be comfortable squished in a piece of fabric as seen in the photo. I use a bridge hammock once in a while and that helps to eliminate the squished feeling.

    If he didn’t have his arm under his head, the fabric would be tight to his neck, not comfy for humans, maybe emerging butterflies :-)

    #3554378
    Doug Johnson
    BPL Member

    @djohnson

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    Hi Dan,

    Actually, when I put my had down and got a diagonal lay, it flattened out quite well. It’s not as bad as it might look in that picture.

    Best, Doug

    #3554439
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    I have been looking at hammocks as a replacement for the quilt/pad(s) I usually carry into the backcountry. I have recently had two neoairs fail rather drastically (one started delaminating and was replaced with an Xlite, the Xlite failed with multiple leaks in the bottom.) Fortunately, I had my NightLite but was forced to choose my ground a LOT more carefully…roots I could quickly cover over with a fairly firm Neoair are obsticals that cannot be ignored with a short pad, for example. And camp turned into a 10 minute chore of finding enough pine needles to level out the ground.  I got another neoair to finish the trip, but I am still looking to replace it.

    Generally, by my calculations, the weight of 2 pads/and a 20F quilt are significantly less than a hammock, 20F underquilt, and a 20F over quilt. Roughly, the underquilt at 17.5oz is equivalent to the pads and the quilts are the same. Only the hammock and whoopie slings add to the weight budget by about 10oz. This is a supper  and some snacks for me. Are the benefits  worth it? My old Hennessey was always uncomfortable, it never stopped swinging and moving it seemed.

    #3554440
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    Hi Marco,

    Not sure what underquilt you have in mind. If it’s full length, I am looking into getting a shorter underquilt, in the 50″ range, and use a small foam pad for my legs. This should allow me to reduce weight and volume. I often carry a frameless pack and I like having that extra bit of cushy foam. The NightLite should be plenty, perhaps combined with the backpack for the coldest nights.

    I thought it was interesting you count the hammock as part of the sleep system. But it makes sense. Until now, when I compare, I counted the hammock, tarp, cordage/hardware and socks (if needed) as part of the shelter when comparing weights to ground sleeping.

     

    #3554465
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Yeah, Well I was looking to have the “chair” also. It is getting difficult to change cloths in the morning before I start packing… Clothing is a simple system of hiking cloths, sleeping cloths & jacket, and, as it gets lower in temps, my fleece/and a mid range set of long johns. Hiking, it is easy enough to stay warm during daylight. But at night, it gets much harder. Like my quilt, I would draw the line at 20F(-7C.) I cannot do any real winter camping anymore, but in the mountains, the temps often dip into the 20’s at night. Daytime temps are usually much higher, >40F. The additional weight is my concern, though. Eventually, I think I could tolerate the rocking with a stake/bungie to the hammock.

    To my mind, shoulder season (spring and fall) is perhaps the most difficult. But it is very quiet and peaceful in the woods. Wet, cold rains, wet snow, half frozen trails can be difficult to handle sometimes, though. I would like to travel as light as possible, since I usually take a two week trip out, often with a 25-30pound pack in spring. Gone are the UL days of summer.

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