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A Micro-Utility Knife: The Backnife Review


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable A Micro-Utility Knife: The Backnife Review

Viewing 13 posts - 26 through 38 (of 38 total)
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  • #3504017
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Nick,

    I had a couple Gingher nippers back when I tied flies. The blades seemed to loose alignment easy when I was using them for heavier (ie not thread cutting) purposes.   The steel was softer than my Gerber knife, soo, I could burnish the blades to very sharp with just a few strokes on the back of the knife blade.

    I gave up on scissors, though. I simply went with a super sharp blade, honed with some diamond paste on a block of maple every 100-200 uses. But, with most ceramics I have ever used, they get sharp and stay sharp longer, but they do not ever hit the super sharp edge of a well burnished/honed piece of hard steel.

    #3504039
    Nick Smolinske
    BPL Member

    @smo

    Locale: Rogue Panda Designs

    Good to know. I’ve never used those clippers for anything but thread, and it makes sense that they wouldn’t be high quality steel.

    Why’d you give up on scissors?

    #3504071
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Nick, scissors are simply two cutting blades. Highly refined larger scissors are more of an anvil edge that guides the sharper cutting edge.Indeed, many times I have cut out tarps, packs, etc by simply pushing the scissors through with *no* scissor action.

    So, really what you are doing with a scissor is cutting, albeit fairly well guided. I simply substitute my sharp knife blade and use it freehand. Similar to one of those “roller cutters,” I really don’t need the second edge, only the stability it supplies. Several ways to get stability. A hot knife cuts pretty well, it just uses a single blade for cutting fabrics. It uses heat instead of sharpness, but the principle is the same. Yes, you need a very sharp knife to do this without heat. (Ignoring the self sealing edge a hot knife leaves behind. Just don’t try to cut two layers at a time…)

     

    #3504072
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    James lives life on the single edge.

    #3504396
    Andrey R
    BPL Member

    @runcyclexcski

    Sorry if this has been asked already. What about passing TSA control — the one and only issue with all microknives, keychain tools etc. Easily lost 10 knifes to them.

    #3504405
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    Knives are a no go, but some scissors are allowed.

    https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring

    #3504406
    Philip C
    BPL Member

    @backnife

    OK, I forgot that one was in my wallet and walked through a MAGNETIC field detector, of course this does not pick it up.

    BUT the full body scan!   I have been stopped twice once because a single business card was in my shirt pocket and second time because a single folded kleenex tissue was in my back jeans pocket!

    You MIGHT be allowed to carry since the blade is only 2 ” long and not a locking blade BUT I would not bet on it!

    Phil (Designer and Manufacturer)

    #3504454
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    When TSA has found a Victorinox Classic in my carry-on, they seize it. About 1/4 of the time.  Then I take another one out of my pile of $4 TSA-seized ones.

    Reduce, reuse, recycle.

    #3504564
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    My tent weighs 1,600 g.
    My quilt weighs 700 g
    My pack weighs 1,140 g (yes, heavy, but good for 2-month long trips)
    My food weighs ~700 g per day.
    These are significant weights.

    I have a couple of favourite small knives, such as the Victorinox Swiss Classic Paring Knife : 8 cm blade, extremely sharp, and huge 25 g. (Actually, mine is a Colterie Paoluci equivalent, bought in Europe somewhere in a hurry. A wickedly dangerous knife, still, after many years.)
    My small Deejo Naked series 15 g unit (https://backpackinglight.com/deejo-knives-caffin/) is also a favourite.
    Better add: all of these have ‘straight’ edges (actually curved), NOT wavy or serrated edges. Wavy edges may be OK for cutting up loaves of bread, but not much else.

    Both seem to be a LOT safer than a Stanley blade held in my hand. Maybe I am a coward?

    Cheers

    #3504576
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    Roger, I agree that 10 or 20 grams more allows for a much more capable knife.

    Or viewed the other way, I can cut the weight of my xxxxxx by 80% (for instance, 200 grams of 2-mil plastic sheeting as a shelter) but I lose most of its functionality when I need it most.

    However, on many trips, I don’t use any knife. The most minimal blade vastly increases my capacities.

    #3504584
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Hi David

    Ah well, we DO use a knife on almost every trip. How?

    Taken in France with French bread and a Benchmade knife – but same idea.
    Also for chopping up cheese and sausage for dinner:

    So I guess the knife depends on the need.

    Cheers

    #3504613
    Stuart Doddy
    BPL Member

    @englishstu

    I use a SAK Classic for most cutting jobs. I have the Caldera Inferno to supplement the Caldera Cone alcohol use.

    If you cannot break the twigs with your hand you are probably using wood too big. For the Inferno woodburning mode I carry an Opinel 7 knife and if only large wood is available I can carefully baton with it.

    #3505149
    Ron S
    BPL Member

    @ron-s-2

    I have officially become backer #536 !!!

Viewing 13 posts - 26 through 38 (of 38 total)
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