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A Micro-Utility Knife: The Backnife Review


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable A Micro-Utility Knife: The Backnife Review

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 38 total)
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  • #3503429
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Companion forum thread to: A Micro-Utility Knife: The Backnife Review

    In this Backnife Review, we focus on the comprehensive (sic) technology that goes into deep and detailed analyses of cutting tools.

    #3503431
    Greg Mihalik
    BPL Member

    @greg23

    Locale: Colorado

    Don’t bother with the link in the review –

     

    And when you break your ceramic blade –

    #3503440
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Ouch! That’s a killer blade replacement cost for a $12 knife. Hopefully backnife will offer the blades they are using for cheaper to their customers.

    #3503524
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    This is probably a better place for thread-drift related to this review.

    Thanks for starting the topic, Ken. :)

    #3503528
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    you can’t just use a regular “Stanley” knife blade?  What’s that cost, $1 and 7 extra grams?

    #3503554
    Philip C
    BPL Member

    @backnife

    Wow, with this kind of unexpected review I had to go live with KickStarter for 25 days.

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1015833300/edc-ceramic-micro-knife

    Yes any standard steel blade can be inserted into the handle,  I probably will be selling ceramic blades from website after initial launch but to be honest, buying two is likely going to be the same price as purchasing one with an extra blade.  (handle protects blade during shipping)

    #3503571
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Good luck to you, @backnife. We used to sell a little folding utility knife in the BPL gear shop days. I think the concept was popularized originally by Mike Clelland! who found that product for us. Got lots of reports of stitches from users of that one, it wasn’t a particularly safe cutting tool. Yours seems to be a much better design, and simpler. I was really impressed by how the ceramic held up to cutting Spectra cord vs. a stainless steel blade.

    #3503579
    Peter Atkinson
    BPL Member

    @peterbob

    Locale: Yorkshire, England

    Is this a piss take: ” Light and small enough for women to carry everyday.”

    Erm this is 2017, I was going to back until I read this.

    #3503591
    Matt Swider
    BPL Member

    @sbslider

    Locale: Santa Barbara

    One complaint I have seen regarding ceramic blades with sharp points is hat the point breaks off easily.  I realize the creator wanted to match a metal knife blade, but I am wondering if this small change from points to a radius would be a change for the better in the long run.

    #3503594
    Philip C
    BPL Member

    @backnife

    Yes, that can be done and may happen with next production run although there are times when a very sharp point is useful – say removing a splinter from finger.  It is quite possible to touch up the pointy end with coarse grit wet/dry sandpaper.  Diamond file of course is much faster.

    #3503595
    Dale Wambaugh
    BPL Member

    @dwambaugh

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    https://www.officedepot.com/a/products/195407/Westcott-Compact-Ceramic-Box-Cutter-34/fromLocalBrowse=false

     

    And more. Yes, ceramic blades break easily. I’d rather have a Victorinox Classic. My favorite EDC du jour is the Leatherman Skeletool KB.

     

     

     

    #3503596
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    For 20 cents of parts (one 15-cent utility-knife blade, 5 cents of Plasti-dip and and a few seconds on the belt sander, you can make a pretty usable 3-gram (4 grams with blade cover) blade.I prefer the style on the right with a finger groove on the bottom.  It lets me put more leverage on the front half.  The blade cover came off of a wind-shield wiper blade (shipped with a cover to be removed upon installation), although the spines from cheap plastic report covers work well too.

    Most trips, I just bring a Victorinox Classic, but for someone super-cheap or an SULer or if you were making a bunch of survival kits or just wanted something to always be in your car, plane or daypack. . .

    Works for both pointers and setters.

    #3503600
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    Locale: California

    You can save a gram, not wait for Kickstarter, and buy a ceramic knife from the same people:

    https://ceramicknife.org/product/micro-folding-ceramic-knife/

    Or for the same 6 grams and a lot less money, but no ceramic:

    https://countycomm.com/collections/cutting/products/pocket-straight-razor-survival-tool

    Yes, the new design might be better, but it’s not that much better IMO.

    Most of these are inexpensive. Buy several, and if you dull, break, or lose one, recycle it and move on.

    And like David, I usually take the SAK Classic, and use the scissors 95% of the time.

    — Rex

    #3503604
    Greg Mihalik
    BPL Member

    @greg23

    Locale: Colorado

    Derma-Safe –

    #3503607
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    “and use the scissors 95% of the time.”

    The most common reason I’ve taken someone from the job site to the ER is because of razor-knife use.

    I’ve never taken someone to the doctor or the hospital because they used scissors.

    And since I started asking myself and others, “Could you do that task with scissors?”, I’ve not taken anyone to the ER.

    #3503614
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Yes – the Derma-Safe knife. That’s the one we used to sell in the gear shop. That sucker has gifted a few ultralight hikers with some stitches. Thanks for posting that graphic Greg.

    #3503616
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I cringe at the thought of sawing with a derma-safe knife.

    #3503617
    Greg Mihalik
    BPL Member

    @greg23

    Locale: Colorado

    I cut off the fractured end of a carbon fiber trekking pole in order to make a field repair.

    I still have all my fingers.

     

    #3503620
    Dale Wambaugh
    BPL Member

    @dwambaugh

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    There was a derma-safe Style hacksaw too. Or make your own with a Sabre saw blade.

    #3503629
    john hansford
    BPL Member

    @johnh1

    I carried a SAK Classic for years and thought it a beautiful little thing until I actually had to use it. I was halfway along a crossing of the Pyrenees from Atlantic to Med when on a steep rocky descent I broke off the carbide tip and some plastic of the tip of a carbon pole. I had a spare tip with me but couldn’t get the old tip off. I tried cutting it off with the SAK but it hardly touched it. I couldn’t get enough grip, and I was worried about the blade closing. Not much AER up there.

    I had to wait until I reached the next hut where the guardienne had a full size Stanley knife, and I could easily whittle away the plastic tip down to the carbon when it was easy to pop off.

    Back home I started researching knives and chose this Spyderco Ladybug, with the extra hard steel. This has a locking blade, two finger recesses and a serrated thumb rest on the blade itself. For such a tiny knife you get a really strong grip. 0.5 ozs.

    I have one of the razor blade knifes and also the saw blade one, but neither would have done the job easily.

    The Spyderco was ridiculously expensive, but I’m retired so WTH.

     

    #3503640
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Looks nice and light. Just do not try to twist it.

    #3503682
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    +1 on the Spyderco knife. And as an added benefit, that turns out to be the main reason I carry it, closed edge fits the locking mechanism of a Bearikade perfectly. Super sharp blade.

    #3503777
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Phil, @backnife, congrats on your successful Kickstarter campaign! Exciting to see it reach its goal over the last few days. Good luck and best wishes on your project.

    #3503824
    K. Urs Grütter, LL.M.
    BPL Member

    @charly13muri-be-ch

    Locale: Switzerland

    Nice little gadget, if you really need a knife –

    When backpacking, I need scissors to open the meal bags (ok, a knife would work, too) or cut tape or patches, a file to take care of my brittle fingernails, tweezers to get rid of thorns and splinters, and a toothpick to keep my jaws serviceable… everything done nicely by the ubiquitous victorinox pen-knife, even though they use a terrible steel which is definitely not up to date.

    If open fire is an issue, no UL knife will work. A cheap mora knife (Walmart has them for less than US$12) with a good handle will do the job – in conjunction with a self-made UL frame saw, so you can saw and split wood safely and lightweight  – no need for a real heavy knife or even an axe, or an expensive folding saw.

    Happy trails, cut safely…

     

    #3503983
    Nick Smolinske
    BPL Member

    @smo

    Locale: Rogue Panda Designs

    I’m just here to point out that you can cut guyline pretty easily with . . . guyline. Or a shoelace. Both work pretty well and if you’ve never done it before, amazingly fast.

    So that’s one use off of the list. I keep going back and forth and whether or not to carry a small knife, and I’m really considering a tiny pair of scissors instead. They would be more useful for first aid stuff (and safer, as certain denizens of the forum are wont to point out).

    In fact, I wonder if I still have a pair of Gingher thread clippers? I bought one but haven’t used it much for sewing because the cheap golden eagle ones are a little better (and cheap). But it would be pretty good for first aid duty and gear repair, and comes with a little plastic cap:

    I will have to check in the shop and see if I still have it, and if so how much it weighs. I’m pretty sure it’s under an ounce.

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