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Ultralight Hunting: Towards a Coherent Definition


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Ultralight Hunting: Towards a Coherent Definition

Viewing 25 posts - 76 through 100 (of 110 total)
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  • #2194583
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    light, maybe for grouse at 10 yards?

    Starts at about 11.5 minutes.

    YouTube video

    #2195394
    Ethan A.
    BPL Member

    @mountainwalker

    Locale: SF Bay Area & New England

    Dave P, thanks for posting (and thanks Ken for pointing out in another thread). Does the one-handed neck adjustment work quickly and easily for you?

    #2196781
    Dave P
    Spectator

    @backcountrylaika

    Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

    Replied to you via original thread. Pasting URL so the conversation in this thread is more coherent:

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=102640

    #2201354
    Dave P
    Spectator

    @backcountrylaika

    Just thought about this today after watching a Russian documentary. It's amazingly simple– no fancy RealTree, old Baikal shotguns, nothing but the content of their canvas ruck and a tomato can on a bail.

    Could duck-hunting fit into the definition of ultralight hunting?

    They don't use decoy, and they rely on a tarp for a tent and a blind. So, I have been thinking:

    20-gauge is considered to be the bare minimum in duck and goose-hunting, and many prefer 10- or 12-gauge and dedicated duck guns tend to be heavier. But the type of shooting is the exact opposite of grouse-hunting where the person want a sub-6 lbs shotgun for walking many hours in the forest. 7 to 8 pounds are considered "light" for a duck gun.

    So, really, one could take the same list except turn the shelter into a blind with camoflagued pattern. Too bad the camo cuben are see-through, and silnylon are difficult to find.

    #3678512
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    Geeze- how did I miss this thread :)

    Thanks Dave for the article!

    Getting a lightweight kit together for a big game backpack hunt is a tough chore no doubt.

    Im headed out midweek for a couple of day, barebones bivy hunt. I’ve got my shelter/sleep setup under three pounds (eVENT bivy, Apex quilt, Xtherm pad), but that is more than offset with a 4.5 lb pack :)

    I found an outfit (just down the road) Kramer Designs that makes a very lightweight tripod- 10 ounces with a ball head. Wouldn’t use it with a heavier optic, but works well with my 10×42’s.

    Ive got my rifle about as light as I can get it- 6 lbs all in.

    I’ll have to weigh my pack before I leave.

     

    #3678530
    Jacob
    BPL Member

    @jakeyjohn1

    Mike @mtwarden,

    What caliber are you using?

    I have recently been inspired by Tim Marshell’s @marshlaw303 grendel build he posted here which was referenced on page 3 of this thread.

    I have also heard of using pistols to hunt big game.

    But I’m still learning a lot about hunting. Do you have any opinions on these or other sub-6lb options?

    #3678545
    W I S N E R !
    BPL Member

    @xnomanx

    Ruger American in .308 here, 7 pounds, 3oz. all in.  Just like tents, I guess it’s the difference ~$500+ makes in a rifle!

    But I just lost my entire local archery and rifle season to fires…

    So I’ve been hunting the ocean instead…That’s 12lbs of lead on my dive belt; sort of the opposite equation vs. hunting on land!

     

     

     

    #3678555
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    Jacob: I’ve seen Manfred be incredibly effective with his Kimber (Mountain Ascent?) in .308.  If I’ve got the model right, it’s 4 pounds 13 ounces before optics.

    That light, in .308, and it’s got some kick to it, so he added a muzzle break.  So it’s got some blast to it and you really want hearing pro.

    Also Jacob:  Sure, people handgun hunt, but I see it mostly as an additional challenge they choose to undertake. You greatly reduce your effective range and even a 3 to 4 pound .44 magnum has 1/2 or less the muzzle energy of a deer rifle, that energy drops off faster with distance, as does the bullet’s trajectory.

    But I know someone locally that got all the Alaskan critters with his rifle and then went back and completed the set again with a bow.  Obviously the stalk becomes paramount and he got a lot of exercise on days when he couldn’t get close enough.  So I could see someone switching to a handgun if they really enjoyed that added stalking.

    We were going for caribou on Adak and someone brought a Glock (in addition to a rifle) and I proposed he could start a Youtube channel, “The Glock Hunter” and video himself going for all the American big-game animals with a plastic Austrian pistol.

    #3678568
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    Mine is a Kimber Hunter (also in .3080; relatively inexpensive in the scheme of things (compared to Kimber’s other offerings anyways and nearly as light).

    I think one would be hard put to find a more all around caliber than the .308 (one could argue .30-06 and possibly .270)- has a very wide range of different bullets (composition and weights); ammo is widely available and doesn’t kick much (even at sub 6 lbs).

    If we ever get back to grizzly hunting or I luck out on bison tag, I would consider something with a little more oomph, but deer/elk (sheep/goat) a .308 with a good bullet is all a person really needs.

     

    #3678619
    Luke Schmidt
    BPL Member

    @cameron

    Locale: Alaska

    There was a thread on Rokslide where Alaskan hunter trimmed a Kimber down to 3 lbs, 9oz without optics.  Basically chambered in 358 Winchester, trimmed the barrel, trimmed action and put a super light MPI stock on. Not a cheap project. But barely heavier then a handgun and way more capable.

     

     

    #3678728
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    Cabela’s had a sale in the 308 Kimber Hunter -$599.

    Had a bunch of Cabela’s points, added some Leupold rings and was out the door for $180!

    Weight with a Redfield 2-7 is 6.38 lbs.

    Still working on some loads. Hornady 178 grain Eld-x look good so far. Not yet ready to claim the rifle is a shooter.

    The action and barrel are the same on the Hunter as the more expensive versions,  a new stock could bring the weight down a near a pound or so.

    Mike, what did you do to bring down the scoped weight under 6 lbs?

     

    #3678730
    W I S N E R !
    BPL Member

    @xnomanx

    So is there a rifle weight threshold where we get silly light and performance suffers?

    #3678736
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    Shortening the barrel costs velocity. Thin barrels will get hot faster and mess with precision if you are shooting more than a few shots. Lighter scopes may be smaller and let in less light. Smaller cartridges weigh less but produce less energy.

    Kind of depends on what you are hunting and how.  Those 22 pack rifles? You could probably make one in low pressure 38 special and have a legal big game rifle in some states and with open sights probably weigh close to one pound. Comparable to using a bow or magnum handgun in distance/type of hunting?

    #3678742
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    Mike, what did you do to bring down the scoped weight under 6 lbs?

    had a gunsmith shorten the barrel to 20″, titanium bolt (guy on 24campfire sells them), but the biggest (and cheapest) loss in weight was removing all the gel in the stock- was close to a 1/2 lb

     

    #3678743
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    So is there a rifle weight threshold where we get silly light and performance suffers?

    lighter rifles are a tougher to shoot, but a little practice fixes that

    currently, as far as modern big game rifles are concerned, only so far you can realistically go with lowering weight- you still need an action, barrel, stock and optics

    even spending a ton money, only gets you fractionally lighter

    #3678751
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    heading out tomorrow for a short bivy hunt

    23 lbs 13 oz for pack/rifle, 3 lbs 8 oz for bino harness (binos/bear spray) so base weight of ~ 27.5 lbs, not too shabby for a rifle hunt

    unfortunately will have to carry close to 8 lbs of water where I’m headed

    #3678756
    W I S N E R !
    BPL Member

    @xnomanx

    From what I’m seeing it strikes me that a ~6# rifle is a solid practical benchmark that won’t break the bank.

    I’m *hoping* another one of my local forests opens this week, the rifle season opens this Saturday. It’s not burning but closed because of risk and lack of manpower due to adjacent fires. This would leave zero time to scout but I might as well try…I always learn something.

    If I can get out I’ll weigh and post my hunting kit. I have the “advantage” (if hunting in hot weather is an advantage!) of not needing much gear for weather.

    Good luck tomorrow Mike! I’d love to see a list/details of your hunting specific gear on this trip sometime.

     

     

    #3678763
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    Thanks Craig!  The weather looks good for bivvying, but not so good for hunting (sunny/warm).

    Hope you’re able to get out.

    #3678835
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    Nice list.

    Season opens here on the 17th.

    What is the purpose of the gel in the stock? How did you figure out to remove it? Any downsides other than recoil?

     

    #3678842
    W I S N E R !
    BPL Member

    @xnomanx

    I know the Ruger American fore/butt is hollow, but not sure about the grip. Most mods I see on it are about adding weight and bedding, not removing weight…

     

    #3678860
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    Yes. I understand the want to add some weight.

    Here is a Buffalo and Bear “Ultralight” rifle with a hollow stock.

    375 ruger, 7.2 lbs. scoped,  300 grains at 2600= ouch

    no bench or prone shooting with that load, mostly use cast or trail boss reduced loads for practice

    People have asked why buy a $300 rifle that shoots $100 ammo? Reloading keeps it cheap. The cast loads (suitable for deer at closer ranges as well as target practice) are about $.40 a round not counting labor, an elk load with a nice Sierra Bullet are about $1.00 and a grouse load with a roundball and a pinch of pistol powder is about $.12! It is the backup big game rifle that if damaged in bad weather, bouncing around in a jeep or mistreated when loaned etc wouldn’t be a big loss. It is fun to try a bigger bore.

    #3679010
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    the gel may simply be a way to keep the Hunter from outpacing their higher priced entries??

    I honestly don’t know what it would be

    this thread is where I got the idea

    https://www.rokslide.com/forums/threads/kimber-hunter-in-6-5-creedmoor-let-the-project-begin.84790/

    my hunt was fun (but tough), no elk though

    #3679058
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    I was reminded as I shopped today, that it is hunting season locally. 

    #3679169
    Dave @ Oware
    BPL Member

    @bivysack-com

    Locale: East Washington

    Is that for first aid or for bleaching Euro Mounts?

    #3685165
    Mike M
    BPL Member

    @mtwarden

    Locale: Montana

    everyone likes a happy ending :)

     

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