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WIFI wood stoves


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Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #3641032
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    I emailed Josh at Ruta Locura to see if he would be making his WIFI stoves again…he didn’t reply back. I would be grateful if someone could comment and attach a few photos of their stove…especially it’s dimensions and the gauge of materials used…the small stove in particular. These shouldn’t be very difficult to copy into a MYOG variant. Thanks, 9fingers/Tim Hogan.

    #3641046
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    I did some hunting and I found the sizes of the stove body, the pipe diameter & circumference…just need the gauges used on the top/bottom, the sides and the chimney…and dimensions of the front door would be nice but not crucial-I can guess that. The way I understand it, Josh did extensive testing so keep the weight down AND still be “beefy” enough to withstand heat without much buckling.

     

    #3641077
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.
    #3641234
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    Thanks, Franco. I have looked thru most of the articles here. I did just get a reply back from Josh at Ruta Locura-he is still making these stoves. You can’t order from his website but he will respond to a message if you leave it there. Cheers, Tim.

    #3641260
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    good to know.
    Right at the start I though that the WiFi was a good compromise between the rectangular and the cylinder type stoves having the good bits from both. (can still cook but faster to assemble and possibly a better burn than the rectangular versions)

    #3641266
    Eric Blumensaadt
    BPL Member

    @danepacker

    Locale: Mojave Desert

    Those look a bit like Seek Outside stoves, but bent on the ends. Maybe safer that way… maybe.

    #3641537
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    Yes, these non-cylinder titaniums are a little heavier but better at cooking & I think a little easier to set up. I have no idea if there are any significant differences between the Seek Outside “U-turn UL stoves” and the Ruta Locura WiFi’s in terms of function or durability. It looks like the former are a little lighter in weight and it looks like they have a door opening which is a little larger…lighter weight not necessarily a plus, especially it causes more warping. I am going to use this stove mostly for camping in cooler temps…but it might be pushed into winter backpacking. A small Ruta Locura is coming hopefully soon. Cheers.

    #3645838
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    Update from Josh-I got this email today: “I am not building stoves or other custom products at this time.” I wanted to let the BPL community know.  I’m now interested in a used WiFi…any size. Tim H.

    #3645962
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    We have a fair bit of experience with both the WiFi and the new (re-released) U-turn. In fact we just spent a week+ with a medium U-turn on a kayak trip on the west side of Kodiak Island: Zachar-Spiridon Archaeology

    Both stoves have their pros and cons. The WiFi weighs less and some subtle things are very nice. The leg rods are outside of the firebox and so don’t corrode or warp, and can me aluminum. The WiFi stove top plate has rivnuts (captured nuts) installed so there is nothing to lose. I ended up putting these on my U-turn too and Kevin is thinking about shipping them this way (maybe, after testing). The damper on the WiFi carries the whole weight of the stove stack and so tends to bow with use. The dampers really get hammered. The WiFi leaks a lot of air at the door and so you really can’t damp the stove down. Most of the time you need to keep the fuel cranking through these things so that’s not a big problem, but the dampers on the U-turn are effective. The door opening on the U-turn is bigger so you don’t have to cut the wood so small. The door on the WiFi is much easier to open since it just hangs there on a little hook, and the handle gets less hot. The cable door grabs on the U-turn are a little weird, so I riveted a piece of Ti foil to the door, but it gets pretty hot. The WiFi has some small channels tack welded inside the top and bottom plates to hold the walls nicely in position. It would be nice if the U-turn had that. Because you don’t have to line up the walls with those Top/bottom plate slots on the U-turn it is slightly easier to assemble, but the difference is minor. For both stoves I highly recommend adding a flange of some sort (shaft collar on the WiFi or a t-nut on the U-turn) near the bottom of the stove leg and using a scrap piece of Ti foil to make a ground heat shield with 4 holes that the legs fit into and rest on the flanges. This offers good ground protection and also superb stove support on soft ground. I’ll add some pics soon.

    We were really bummed when Ti Goat closed production, but I’m happy to report that Seek Outside offers a largely comparable product.

    #3645968
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    Rivnut in U-turn top plate:

    T-nut stove leg base (slightly crushed with channel locks so they grip the leg all thread and don’t fall off):

    Scrap of pipe turned into heat shield/stove base:

    #3645974
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    That’s a wonderful video, Philip. Thanks for sharing it.

    #3645987
    Iago Vazquez
    BPL Member

    @iago

    Locale: Boston & Galicia, Spain

    Loved that video, Philip. Thank you so much for sharing!

    #3645993
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    No problem. I added it to the end of my Crossing Kodiak Island thread, but I guess folks aren’t reading post-trip reports much right now, lol. I included a bit more detail there on what we were doing.

    #3646022
    Logan Kidwell
    BPL Member

    @logan

    Locale: Florida

    Thanks for sharing your videos Phil. They can sometimes be hard to find, but I absolutely love your adventures and your eye for sharing them. Thanks!

     

    Logan

     

    #3646038
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    I apologise if I posted twice-I was trying to reply with my iphone. Thanks, Phil-great video and great information. I just ordered a medium U-turn so your modifications are very useful to me. I have a couple of “metal working friendly” friends who can help me with this if necessary. It wasn’t very clear to me by looking at photos how the WiFi nuts were attached/captured to the stove top on the WiFi…I think I understand now. Phil, are those the stock legs on the U-turn? Will there be any significant weight savings by using aluminum legs? Could anyone add photos of the channels on the top and bottom plate of the WiFi here? I think they could be added to the U-turn. Thanks, Tim.

     

    #3646056
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    If you look at YouTube on how to install a rivnut their usefulness and application will be obvious. On the SO website it show their stoves with wing nuts holding the top plate on. This basically prevents the use of a decent sized cook pot with the stove. I think they are currently shipping stoves with t-nuts (the flanged nut on the lower legs in the above images) that sit nearly flush in the top plate, like a loose rivnut. That’s great, but the ones the send aren’t stainless, and if you lose them you have problems. Also, because the rivnut is captured, the stove legs directly support the top plate, rather than the compression force being passed down through the stove walls to the bottom plate. The walls are much thinner Ti foil and deform easily. That said, the U-turn works fine w/o the channels the WiFi has. All these stoves experience a LOT of heat warpage and look pretty funky after moderate use. But as long as you don’t lose parts, overstuff with wood, or really abuse them, they work well despite adopting non-Euclidean geometries.

    The legs in the image are the stock stainless allthread. They are good quality. No heat deformation or corrosion so far. I tried some M5 (metric) titanium allthread legs with my stove (the pics are of my friend Patrick’s stove that I worked on), and despite it having a higher meltpoint than stainless (ignoring alloys here), I did get some heat warping in my ti legs inside the firebox. They may be junky ti though. I don’t know how aluminum would fare, but the legs that pass through the combustion chamber are subject to some serious heat. A metallurgist would have to chime in.

    The rivnut on a small WiFi (note the nice corner gusset tacked in):

    WiFi channels;

    #3646078
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    Alright- that is exactly what I need. I hope that Seek Outside sees this and modifies their stoves. I’ll be happy to buy (another) one if they do. Thanks, Phil!

     

    #3646117
    kevin timm
    BPL Member

    @ktimm

    Locale: Colorado (SeekOutside)

    We are aware. We have stoves out in testing. Our concern is seize up with extended usage. Likely it is not enough issue and the benefits outweigh the small chance. The reason we show wing nuts, vs weld nuts is because of potential seize up.

    #3646195
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    Thanks for weighing in, Kevin. You’re continued engagement on these forums is always constructive. One thing that really impressed me about the U-turn was how it seemed more efficient. Since I cut most of the wood, and Patrick does the cooking while feeding the stove and controlling the dampers, I’m acutely sensitive to fuel consumption. The WiFi gobbles wood, and the U-turn has a more reasonable appetite.

    As long as we are on the topic of stoves, I quickly want to address perhaps the most frustrating part of getting a new stove: rolling the pipe for the first burn.

    Your new pipe will arrive like a roll of toilet paper and will single-mindedly want to assume that shape. You have to unroll it and force it to roll in an orthogonal orientation the first time you use it. Once you have burned the pipe in once it will happily roll into either shape, but before that, yow!

    This is what I came up with. On a table saw, I made an offset cut in one wall of a 10’ piece of PVC pipe. I slid the pipe foil into this cut and used a firm but smooth surface (rigid foam board) to facilitate rolling the pipe around the PVC. I was able to slide the cable rings into position and then slide the PVC back out the end. The result was a pipe with hardly a dimple.

    Viewed from the end before rolling:

    Rolled with cable rings in place:


    So smmmmmooooooth, lol:

    #3646201
    Timothy Hogan
    BPL Member

    @9fingers

    Locale: Pacific NW

    Kevin, are you shipping out the stoves with wing nuts? Stainless steel? Legs stainless? Thanks.

    #3646386
    Greg Pehrson
    BPL Member

    @gregpehrson

    Locale: playa del caballo blanco

    Philip, that is a brilliant rolling strategy. Thanks for sharing.

    #3646396
    kevin timm
    BPL Member

    @ktimm

    Locale: Colorado (SeekOutside)

    Stainless nuts and legs are what they ship with. I also had a discussion on rivnuts today/ We are trying to source and test one of a different shape. However, while it is a good DIY mod , it probably will be a few months before we get there.

    #3646522
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    I should mention that we burn a fair amount of beach driftwood in our stoves. This contains sodium and chlorine (as chloride) from seawater, which volatilize, react, and form any manner of nasty reactive compounds that eat stove components. We like titanium and stainless steel because they appear to be less reactive given our wood sources, but other alloys may work better in non-coastal environs. What I’m trying to say is, it’s been a long time since inorganic chemistry.

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