Topic

Superior Wilderness Designs Big Wild 70


Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) Superior Wilderness Designs Big Wild 70

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 86 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #3701093
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    @bradmacmt – the stays actually insert from the bottom on the outside of the package. This is a great idea because it allows the inside to be more easily seam taped.https://backpackinglight.com/wp-content/uploads/hm_bbpui/3701093/6aojcmvzbv0fzm0ox6g90k1gwp0sdx24.jpeg

    #3701400
    Thomas W
    BPL Member

    @teewatt

    Pet approved! Thanks for the photos Ben! The interface looks pretty solid, how does it compare at the other end for the load lifters?  Any issues feeling the tri glide or other hardware through the hipbelt?

    #3701416
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    Nothing noteworthy on the load lifter end. It works and is solid.

    I can’t feel the hardware through the belt.

    BTW the whole thing is seam taped and fully waterproof in this DCF version. Other fabrics might be different obviously, but this is a cool option.

    #3706805
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    The pack has undergone some changes and is on its way back to me. The hip belt has changed and is now even lighter. Likely the pack will come in closer to 38oz but we’ll see. I’ll give it another try and post an update.

     

    #3706996
    Erik G
    BPL Member

    @fox212

    Locale: Central Coast

    Looks like a great pack with a very intelligent frame/hip belt and feature set. Love the steeply slanted side pockets as well.

    Can someone elaborate on the benefits of the floating hip belt arrangement? How, in terms of physics and ergonomics, is it superior than, say, a full wrap hip belt (other things being equal like construction, padding, etc)? Would love to hear some insights on this.

    #3707000
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    In theory the best thing about the floating belt is that it will match the angle of your pelvic tilt. If you have some anterior pelvic tilt (top of pelvis tilting forward) the belt will match that. It does wrap fully too.

    I’m personally still on the fence about whether it’s that much better or not, but I’m intrigued because I do have some anterior pelvic tilt.

    I’m sure others have plenty to say on the topic.

    #3707042
    Erik G
    BPL Member

    @fox212

    Locale: Central Coast

    Thanks, Ben! That’s a helpful insight

    #3707624
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    SWD sent me a Big Wild to put some miles on.  Sewing, design, and load carriage are on first impressions very impressive indeed.

    #3707625
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    A floating hipbelt (the simplest definition of which is one that isn’t sewn vertically into the bag in any load bearing capacity) does three separate things better (IMO) than any other design.

    First is accommodate fit variations as Ben mentioned.

    Second is to use less foam, fabric and things which can compress and sag under load than, for instance, a traditional lumbar pad arrangement.  This preserves torso length under load, and when done properly makes for a more comfortable arrangement in that one doesn’t have to keep tightening the hipbelt as loads get higher and hours under said load accumulate.

    Third, a hanging belt is lighter, for the same performance, than any other rig as it requires the least material.  For this reason alone it is the obvious choice for an UL load hauler.

    #3707641
    Federico Calboli
    BPL Member

    @fedster9

    Are the compression straps attached with a super burly gatekeepers (or however we want to call gated plastic buckles), or are they attached with metal hooks?  My impression from the pictures is that the webbing attaches and detaches using metal hooks, but I am not 100% sure.

    #3707878
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    Straps attach with plastic hook buckles.  You can see one in Ben’s photo of the hipbelt above.  The nose is angled such that when you rotate them 180 degrees they slide out quite easily.  One handed functionality and security are both quite good.  I haven’t tried to break them yet, so that end of things remains to be seen.

    #3708044
    Spencer Lindenberg
    BPL Member

    @lindenberg44

    Anyone have an idea of when this pack will be ready for production and available to purchase?

    #3708059
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    Dave – does the X50 seem super burly? I have never used it, but I have used X42 which I like a lot. I was a little surprised that it makes this pack a full 10oz heavier than the DCF version. But I guess that gives us an idea of the Big Wild weight range right there. 40oz for DCF, then a little more for VX21, a little more for X42, and then 50oz for X50.

    #3708117
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    Super burly is definitely the right descriptor.  9.5 oz/yard I think?  I like it, but for most folks it is certainly overkill.

    #3711432
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    Posted some updates on my site so I’ll copy/paste here:

    Update: May 4th, 2021:

    After carrying a ton of weight on that second Dirty Devil trip I was experiencing some hipbelt hardware slippage and belt collapse. I sent the pack back to SWD and they redesigned the hipbelt and it is now incredible. Both the shape and attachments have changed. I took it on a 12 mile trip carrying a lot of water and fresh fruit and vegetables because, why not? The new attachment doesn’t slip and the belt no longer collapses at all. This is due in part to the fact that the upper part of the belt is now attached to an adjustable piece of webbing sewn under the removable sit pad. I found that tightening this upper webbing nearly, but not quite all the way resulted in a very supportive, non-collapsing belt that still articulates perfectly to my anterior pelvic tilt.

    This pack is now officially as comfortable, if not more comfortable than my Seek Outside Divide 4500. And that’s saying something considering it weighs about a pound less.

    #3711441
    Spencer Lindenberg
    BPL Member

    @lindenberg44

    Thanks for the update – can’t wait to get my hands on one of these!

    #3711591
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    Echoing Ben’s assessment; I have been quite impressed with this pack.  It survived a recent ski/packraft trip (with a starting pack weight above 50 pounds) very well.  In my testing the stays start to get a little whippy above 60 pounds, below that weight I’d pick this versus something with a more rigid frame.

    #3711839
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    I really like the basics of this pack – a lot. But I can’t get past the attachment points on the front of the pack… I’m just not seeing the logic of them. It seemingly employs two widely spaced daisy chains on the horizontal that are essentially useless to me. I think if this pack had two simple 20″ vertical daisy chains on the front spaced 8-10″ apart, or  a 20-24″ stretch stash pocket ala ULA, this pack would really be something more practical and desirable to most backpackers.

    #3711842
    Chad Lorenz
    BPL Member

    @chadl

    Locale: Teton Valley, Wydaho

    Ben or Dave, have either of you tried an Alpacka bow bag on the front daisy chains?

    #3711990
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    bradmacmt – I’ll try and post a bunch of pictures soon demonstrating the ways to use the modular system. I like it for PFD. They do custom requests so it’s possible you could order one with a pocket thought I’m not positive.

    Chad Lorenz – Not yet but I’ve been thinking about that. Would actually be cool if someone made a lighter version of that. Maybe just mesh, that could work as a talon on this pack. Something to think about.

    #3712038
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    Ben, I’d probably get one with two vertical daisy chains and dispense with all the other webbing/attachments.

    Thanks.

    #3712043
    Ben Kilbourne
    BPL Member

    @benkilbourne

    Locale: Utah

    bradmacmt – cool

    #3712517
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    I don’t have an Alpacka bow bag, but do use one I made that is a bit smaller.  On the recent big trip I was able to attach it several different ways via all the loops.  I imagine there would be plenty of options with the Alpacka bag.

    #3712855
    Daryl and Daryl
    BPL Member

    @lyrad1

    Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth

    MYOG Weight Savings – Backpacking Light

    Just a reminder from the Make Your Own division that a pack weighing 1 lb or less is a reasonable goal.  Large capacity (two of the largest bear cans inside =no problem), full suspension frame with all the weight on your waist, top bar for strapping on tents, pads, etc.

    Another 4 ounces and you can add a front bag that gives you the balancing advantages of an Aarn Pack.

    The price you pay is a few hundred hours of experimenting and the insanity that can come from the MYOG hobby.

    #3713115
    David Chenault
    BPL Member

    @davec

    Locale: Queen City, MT

    You’re a kook Daryl.  The very best kind, but a kook nonetheless.

    Even cutting all the corners you’re not getting a 70 liter pack that can carry 60 pounds well down to a pound.  The necessary foam and structural elements alone will be close to that.  Add fabric to withstand bushwacking, ski carry, etc and sub 2 pounds isn’t really doable with current technology.

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 86 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Loading...