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Should BPL have a UL Travel Category


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Home Forums Administration & Support Website & Forum Support Should BPL have a UL Travel Category

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
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  • #3476451
    Valerie E
    BPL Member

    @wildtowner

    Locale: Grand Canyon State

    While perusing a Gear thread, someone suggested this, and I wondered if it might not be a pretty darned good idea… Thoughts from members?

    #3476468
    rubmybelly!
    BPL Member

    @sleeping

    Locale: The Cascades

    Great, so now I’ll have to remove all the caps off the stems on my tires, cut my rear view mirror and sunshades in half, change my faux leather seat coverings to cuben, and always roll down my windows instead of using air conditioning. Ugh.

    #3476470
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    BPL is UL travel.

    #3476516
    Jeffs Eleven
    BPL Member

    @woodenwizard

    Locale: NePo

    Air conditioners?  You still lug those things around?

    i cut mine out years ago and never looked back. Its amazing what you realize you dont need.

    #3476527
    rubmybelly!
    BPL Member

    @sleeping

    Locale: The Cascades

    Okay, somewhat serious (which is rather painful for me…), I’d say no. IMPO, I think there are too many forums already. I think that any UL travel could easily be discussed in the philosophy category, and in the On the Web category when appropriate, and even the gear category, since UL travel would span those categories.

    #3476553
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    Pre trip planning exists too.

     

    #3476583
    Simon Kenton
    BPL Member

    @simonbutler

    I’d vote yes.

     

    Backcountry travel and travel, in the sense that I think you mean, are two different things. The gear used for UL frontcountry travel is different than the gear used for UL backcountry travel. I walked the WHW and I wouldn’t consider that backcountry travel at all; still, UL gear made that trip more enjoyable.

     

    Why not make gathering and finding information about the latter easier by making a distinct category?

    #3476590
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    We promote multi-day, backcountry travel in a self-supported (“backpackable”), lightweight style. – Backpacking Light Mission Statement

    #3476593
    Simon Kenton
    BPL Member

    @simonbutler

    If you’re using the mission statement as a reason not to have a frontcountry travel subforum, then why have Chaff or other forums unrelated to the mission statement?

    #3476598
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    All the knowledge is here. Travel is just backpacking with even less stuff. Does BPL need to be everything for everyone?

    I’ll leave you to it.

    #3476672
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Well, XUL, SUL, UL and Light weight are all within the purview of this site. But peoples definitions vary. What is often used on a lightweight trip for three weeks, is NOT what you would use for XUL travel on a weekend.
    XUL…<3 pounds
    SUL…<5 pounds
    UL…<10 pounds
    Light…<20 pounds
    These are all baseweights, ie, everything in your pack except food/fuel/water. Some will say consumables meaning bug dope, soap, etc.
    Anyway, I have been out XUL, SUL but these are for a few days in good weather. UL I use mostly in spring, summer, and fall for trips above 25F at night. Lightweight I use for late fall and early spring at <20F. It would be nice to separate the categories, but I don’t believe it is really necessary.

    #3476734
    Bruce Tolley
    BPL Member

    @btolley

    Locale: San Francisco Bay Area

    I think if there is enough interest, why not

    @ OP, did you really mean ultra light?

    I can see many similarities to light backpacking

    -Carrying gear in pack

    -Carrying the fewest number of items possible

    -Carrying as many multi use items as possible

    -Lots of walking / Travelling on foot perhaps bicycle (interspersed with other means)

    -Applying the philosophy of keeping it simple

    and yes leaving the kitchen and the shelter behind

    differences:

    -You staying  overnight in places with roofs, heating, running potable water

    -Eating in places where other people do your cooking

    -Your significant other is much more likely to say YES to joining the trip

     

    #3476759
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    If no sub forum for UL travel emerges, anyone interested in how to go about it efficiently would be advised to PM Ben Tang.  He could easily write a book on the subject.

    #3476790
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    1001 other things to fix first though. This two year site switch has left a mark. Would love to see the return of the natural world forum and reader reviews.

    #3476812
    Eric Lundquist
    BPL Member

    @cobberman

    Locale: Northern Colorado

    There are already websites dedicated to such forms of travel.

    One Bag One World and http://www.onebag.com/

    Take one change of quick-drying clothes, wash them at night, alternate.  Take fewer items and multipurpose items.  Buy what you need/forgot when you get there and don’t pack your fears.

    #3476883
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    I’ll include UL travel thoughts in some of my responses to other questions (e.g. 2.8-ounce sil-nylon day packs are (1) stuff sacks, (2) bear-hang bags,  (3) side-trip packs and (4) over-flow packs worn on your chest after a re-supply but also (5) handy around town when returning from the grocery store on public transit and (6) fabulous when doing overseas travel for a day of wandering around town and in case you need another carry-on on your return trip due to “mission creep” and souvenirs acquired abroad) mostly to remind people of other, front-country uses for some gear and as a potential incentive to spend the money ($30 from Sea to Summit or $8 on eBay in the above case) if it isn’t only BP gear.

    But there is a specific set of conditions unique to travel that changes my gear and clothing selection.  For instance, while quick-dry clothing is super helpful, low-stink materials are less important because in the front country you can always find a sink and a dry place to hang clothes.  120-volts, ice, treated water, and a solid roof make certain techniques, weight-savings, and cost-savings possible that can’t be done on the trail.  Modern detergents are fine to use in a hotel sink but not on the trail, etc.

    Alternately, I could see it mostly being addressed in an article.

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