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Pink snow-safe to boil for food/drink?


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Home Forums General Forums Food, Hydration, and Nutrition Pink snow-safe to boil for food/drink?

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #3718757
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @pula58

    If we melt pink snow, and bring it to a boil (at ~ 6000′ elevation) is it then safe to use to prepare food and drink?

    #3718797
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Never tried it. Always scraped it away. Much safer.

    Boiling might work, maybe. Can you scrape the scum off the top?

    Cheeers

    #3718798
    Jon Fong
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    The snow is oink due to an alga (my wife’s a Marine Biologist that specalizes in alga).

    For obvious reasons, pink snow is sometimes called “watermelon snow”. Oddly enough, it’s even said to smell a bit like watermelon. So why shouldn’t you find out if it tastes that way too? According to botanist Joyce Gellhorn’s 2002 book Song of the Alpine, there’s a very good reason: in addition to being a tantalizingly refreshing-looking on a hot day after a long hike where a snow cone would be just the ticket, it’s also a laxative.

    #3718799
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @pula58

    Laxative…nope, don’t need that!

    #3718806
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Changes Often

    The yellow snow is what you have to watch out for.

    It’s weight prohibitive, but a small hand held geiger counter might be nice when evaluating questionable snow. Not as concerning as back in the good old days however, back when above ground nuclear testing was the norm.

    #3718937
    Sarah Kirkconnell
    BPL Member

    @sarbar

    Locale: Homesteading On An Island In The PNW

    Can I tell you it’s bad or safe? No. But why would you do it? Unless it was your only choice for water.

    #3718944
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    We know pink snow is a kind of green algae.  We know some green algaes, under some conditions, are known to release toxins.  We know toxins are not neutralized by boiling like bacteria and parasites are.  And we know pink snow has been reported to cause digestive issues, regardless of its toxin status.

    All that doesn’t tell me whether boiling it helps, but I for one will stay away from it.

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