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Osprey thinks you want to buy a 6.7 lb $700 backpack.


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Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) Osprey thinks you want to buy a 6.7 lb $700 backpack.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 36 total)
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  • #3743397
    Johan
    BPL Member

    @johan-river

    Locale: Cascadia

    https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/unltd-airscape-68-UNLTDAS68MS22_433.html

    I was about to clown on this new product, but they got me on one fine detail that makes all the difference. They included a hip belt that can be adjusted while wearing the pack! /s

    So, what am I missing here? Is there an aspect to this pack that would make it magically carry weight better than anything else? Cause, all I can keep seeing is that they still put the compression straps on the outside of the mesh pockets. I hate having to cut those and reroute them under the pocket mesh.

    But, then I got around to thinking… What if Osprey is offering backpacks at a WAY better price per pound than others out there? If price per pound is taken into account, my Zpacks is a horrible deal, at over TWICE the price per pound of backpack. I got ripped off by Zpacks, for sure. It would have been nice of them to sew lead into the pack to give me a better deal for my money.

    New Osprey pack $104/ lb

    Zpacks Arc Blast $266/ lb

    Well, there you have it! The Osprey is a raging deal for thru-hikers looking to get the best price per pound of backpack.

     

    #3743401
    Ratatosk
    BPL Member

    @ratatosk

    I’ll gladly take an extra pound or so on a pack if it makes the pack wearable, or doubles the life of the materials. Several pounds seems a little excessive.

    You did forget to mention the premium rainfly, though!

    #3743405
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    If you’re going to be hauling 90 pounds of rocks through heavy brush, then the pack will need to strong, tough, and the 6.7 pounds won’t be a big fraction of the load.

    But even for hunting – the classic “you need a substantial pack to haul all that meat back” situation, I use a UL pack and UL gear because you hike around a lot before harvesting an animal (if you do at all) and then you take the shortest possible trip back to the truck.  That the return trip isn’t the most comfortable (is a given) and I accept that.  Also, for larger critters (or a herd of caribou), you’re making multiple trips, so I have a more substantial pack in the truck for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 13th meat Sherpa trips.  Even then, the “more substantial pack” is a 2.5-pound Kelty framed pack with a big padded hipbelt.

    #3743408
    CS
    BPL Member

    @covecs

    Also, for larger critters (or a herd of caribou), you’re making multiple trips, so I have a more substantial pack in the truck for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 13th meat Sherpa trips.

    I defiantly would be entertained if Ospery had marketing material about hauling a heard of caribou with the pack.

     

     

    #3743409
    Larry Swearingen
    BPL Member

    @larry_swearingen

    Locale: NE Indiana

    Boy, they are sure proud of the “High Carbon Stainless Steel”. Whatever that is.

    Larry S

    #3743420
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    High carbon stainless steel is a metal alloy containing relatively high amounts of carbon. The amount of carbon can be as much as 1.2% and as low as 0.2%. The reasons for this vary with the manufacturer and the type of blade they’re creating.

    Typically used for making knives and so on.

    Cheers

    #3743422
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    No thanks.  Flashing back to my 8 lb Gregory Expedition pack. You could carry a Volkswagen in that thing…but eventually realized I didn’t want to.

    #3743423
    Dan
    BPL Member

    @dan-s

    Locale: Colorado

    This pack will last you for the rest of your life, and also ensure that you regret every second of it.

    #3743430
    David Gardner
    BPL Member

    @gearmaker

    Locale: Northern California

    Calling it an “AirScape” is a joke.

    I have a hot pink 1992 Montbell 100L+ pack billed at the time as UL at 4 lbs., which, in addition to many backpacking trips, I have used for years as a training pack loaded with up to 80 lbs. of deadweight, and it’s still going strong. Hard to understand how 30 years of advances results in a pack 2.8 heavier that could haul those loads and last that long.

    #3743442
    Tom K
    BPL Member

    @tom-kirchneraol-com-2

    With a max capacity of 72 L in the XL size, it is hard to imagine it being able to do much of anything better than, for example, a ULA Catalyst with a volume of 75 liters, a weight of 2# 14 oz, and a price of $300.  Unless it includes a jet pack in the frame, of course.  The exception would be for carrying loads of meat, or maybe unobtanium.  None of the lightweight packs that I know of are set up for that.  And this is after all a community oriented toward lightweight equipment.

    #3743450
    Sam Farrington
    BPL Member

    @scfhome

    Locale: Chocorua NH, USA

    David,

    If you hike in griz country, try one of those hiker’s rear view mirrors to check behind you for bears.

    #3743454
    Johan
    BPL Member

    @johan-river

    Locale: Cascadia

    I think you can just yell out “Go-Go-Gadget Bear Repellent!” and the $700 backpack does the rest.

    #3743468
    bradmacmt
    BPL Member

    @bradmacmt

    Locale: montana

    Osprey has been addicted to gimmickry for a long time. Their packs are mostly ladden with a lot of unnecessary crap that adds weight and complexity. BUT they do look good hanging on the walls of the local backpackatorium and really get newbs excited.  Now if they’d gone back to a pack with customizable stays attached to a decent suspension I’d be impressed.

    #3743472
    Scott H
    BPL Member

    @cbk57

    This type of pack and even the Aether and Atmos appeal heavily to the new or casual backpacker that shops at their local outdoor store or REI.  I have purchased Osprey packs personally, we have owned both Aether and Atmost packs, lots of gimmicks and zippers.  I found a huge flaw in their hip belt as it adjusted with velcro for length.  So my son was using the pack and the hip belt would slide before it could take enough tension to really properly get the weight off his shoulders.  We have cut our gear weight and went to simpler packs but many people think starting out they need a pack that will carry “comfortably” 50 pounds or more.  I have been there and own that T-shirt.  I also now know from experience that is wrong at least for me.

    I love REI but look at the great brands they do not carry, Gossamer Gear, Zpacks, Seek Outside and many more I cannot name.

    We have a good outdoor store in town, they don:t cary anything other than Osprey, Deuter, Fjaraven and brands like that.

    So the first thing most new would be backpackers see is an Osprey pack.  It is reviewed and gets great reviews in Backpacker and Outside magazine and so that is what they go out and buy.  If like me they have kids in Scouting they see adults wearing Osprey packs for the most part.

    #3743493
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @pula58

    My 60 liter Granite Gear carries more gear than my Osprey Aether 85 (liter) pack.

    IMHO Osprey exaggerates their pack volumes.

    #3743495
    David Gardner
    BPL Member

    @gearmaker

    Locale: Northern California

    It’s starting to sound like Osprey packs are the kind that newbies buy, try, and give up on backpacking afterwards because it hurts to carry so much weight.

    #3743499
    Mark Cashmere
    BPL Member

    @tinkrtoy

    Locale: NEOH

    While this clearly can’t be targeted at ULers or even SULers, I am trying to visualize their audience with these. Hunters and other potential heavy-carry folks are surely going to find some thing cheaper in this same weight hauling class. Lots of really interesting tech that might be applicable in future cottage packs maybe. I guess someone has to try this stuff out. Quite confusing.

    #3743500
    Mark Cashmere
    BPL Member

    @tinkrtoy

    Locale: NEOH

    Might as well get one of these to go with it — https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hipstar#/

    #3743519
    William Chilton
    BPL Member

    @williamc3

    Locale: Antakya

    <p style=”text-align: center;”>While this clearly can’t be targeted at ULers or even SULers, I am trying to visualize their audience with these.</p>

    I think it’s aimed at that other type of backpacking, where you stay in cheap hostels in Thailand etc (or perhaps not so cheap, if you can afford this pack).

    As evidence, I cite the top lid, which converts into a day pack (or a lumbar pack on the smaller model) and the “custom Airporter travel cover with lockable zippers”.

    Osprey makes some decent packs for lightweight backpacking. I find the the Levity packs very comfortable at well over 1kg, and the older model of the Exos can be got down to under 900g without the lid.

    It seems that commenting critically on BPL on something that you haven’t tried* is a no no if it’s an X-Mid, but fine if it’s (all?) Osprey packs (or the Dirigo).

    *Not that one needs to try this particular pack to realise how heavy it is.

    #3743522
    Ratatosk
    BPL Member

    @ratatosk

    ^There may be a correlation between what’s linked in the Gear Shop and what’s not, in terms of how assiduously armchair critiques are policed.

    My granite gear pack has a “removable top lid” that’s such a pain to remove it may as well be soldered on, but I can see the appeal of having a lid-bag for summiting or day hikes or what have you. HPG made a series of kit bags for concealed carry that are being more or less cloned for UL use these days, and they’re super useful. I’d much rather trade into one of those, rather than want a daybag integrated into a pack.

    #3743565
    Dan
    BPL Member

    @dan-s

    Locale: Colorado

    My 60 liter Granite Gear carries more gear than my Osprey Aether 85 (liter) pack.

    I really think that the GG Crown packs are hard to beat as a piece of mass-market gear (sold by REI and other mall retail stores) at a great price. It was basically my gateway piece to lightweight gear and I still own it. I feel that Nemo fills the same niche for shelters.

    #3743568
    Niko Z.
    BPL Member

    @niko-z

    Locale: SE Asia, Europe

    That Osprey backpack is sold for $566 in Indonesia. At first I thought it could be a knock-off. However, I compared prices for other bags on the official Osprey website for Indonesia, and they tend to be a bit lower across the board compared to the US.

    Not sure why the discrepancy. Osprey are made in Vietnam mostly.

    Cheers,

    Niko t.

    #3743570
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    One could mumble about the cost of shipping, but I suspect it could be more that American retail wants a higher markup (profit) and American customers have a lot more money.

    Cheers

    #3743571
    Niko Z.
    BPL Member

    @niko-z

    Locale: SE Asia, Europe

    The difference seems to be about 25 percent across the board. I agree that shipping costs alone may not account for such a large discrepancy.

    The specs listed by the Indonesian retailer for the UNLTD model are slightly different than the official Osprey website. Sometimes brands tweak the products slightly for different markets. However, it could just as easily be errant data entering.

    #3744164
    Murali C
    BPL Member

    @mchinnak

    I think Osprey is looking for idiots……apologize in advance if you bought one:-) The number of people who will buy it will be 0.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 36 total)
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