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Nemo Equipment Blaze 2P Tent Review


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Nemo Equipment Blaze 2P Tent Review

Viewing 17 posts - 26 through 42 (of 42 total)
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  • #3480480
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    If they made this tent in a one person for a pound and a half…I’d be tempted to buy it. And use polycryo for a ground cloth. I like double walls. Hate insects, dislike condensation on my bag. The fact that the outer skin doesn’t come completely down to the ground might make me more concerned about wind than rain. But Emylene seems pretty confident here.

    #3480520
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    I haven’t had much trouble with the single wall being leaky, that said I am used to a single wall shelter. Unless you have a driving directional rain, the tarp tends to keep the majority of rain off the single wall portion. Again I will say, tent placement is almost everything, regardless of what shelter you use. The better your placement, the less shelter you get away with.

    Alberta as a climate (aside from daily thunderstorms from June to September and snow September to May) tends to be dry. I get away with a great deal here. My biggest issue is the rapid weather changes and cooler temperatures. The warmest day hiking I’ve ever had in Alberta is 28C. The coldest in the minus 20C range (I won’t hike (snowshoe/cross country ski) any cooler than that) it gets cooler I just refuse after that.

    I took it on my coastal trips and it worked well, but again placement allows more leeway.

    I would also be tempted by a single shelter with double walls. Bivies have never been a good friend of mine, I’m mildly clausterphobic.

     

     

     

     

    #3480572
    Bob Moulder
    BPL Member

    @bobmny10562

    Locale: Westchester County, NY

    A 37 oz tent with a 10 oz ground sheet is UL?

    Sure, it’s easy to stay under 10 lb base by exercising more discipline with gear selection when it comes to pack and sleep system and other gear, but there are shelter options that weigh half as much as this one that don’t cost all that much more.

    I must agree with Tad’s opinion that handing out the “highly recommended” rating for this product in a UL context really devalues the currency.

    #3480594
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Well Bob, as I pointed out to Tad. The ground cloth could be made for 5-6 oz. I had less than 24 hours to get on my next trip when the tent arrived. At 5-6 oz will not add additional insulation like the Mylar.  It also has less emergency applications. You will also notice the other shelter options are not free-standing, double-wall, double door, double vestibule. Massive difference in features for similar weight.

    When the other shelters factor in trek poles  and a 5-11 oz ground cloth, it’s more weight yet. I typically don’t use two trek poles myself, it’s a nuisance carrying both (or one in most applications.) If I carry trek poles they are usually more as emergency crutches and splits than functioning gear. I should use them more, however though I don’t hate them, I don’t like them either. I end up with almost a pound of pole I don’t want. Many other readers are likely in the same boat.

    #3480596
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    No.

    #3480601
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Lol only if you actually use them! I don’t, they are just heavy shelter poles. I have been using them more since tearing my ACL and my accident but I often have had them riding around for nothing but a shelter because I might want them.

    Tent poles, aside from shelter can also serve as splints and a few other applications if you aren’t carrying trek poles. If comes down to what type of shelter works best for your application- Freestanding or not. This is most certainly UL for a freestanding tent, last I had a dome tent it was measured at about 3lbs 8oz. 1 lb anything is nearly unheard of in any dome style. I actually couldn’t find any to compare to. If you look at the product comparisons, there are no domes and almost no free standings.

    #3480603
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    ??

    #3480604
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    ..

    #3480607
    Danny Milks
    BPL Member

    @dannymilks

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    This is clearly not a free-standing shelter.

    #3480611
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Hi again Ken,

    the way I see it the vestibules are not an integral part of the tent. Once you are inside, aside from being more stable and roomie with pegs it’s free standing.

    And as far as being first, I mean first ultra light especially in Canada. I am quite certain your 80’s tent weighed in the 3-5 pound range, tunnel tents even worse. And again, we are missing Bob’s other comment. Here when I posted, moderated afterwards.

    #3480614
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    not worth it

    #3480615
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Ken, I’m going to remind you here about the BPL policy about respectful posting. I suspect you have needed this reminder several times in the past.

    Meaning your sarcasm is noted, innapropriate and unproductive in the forum.

    #3480620
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    Done.

    #3480621
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    If you would like to provide a list of ultralight, dome style, two door, two vestibule tents available in Canada and the States, I’d be happy to look at it.

    #3480633
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    Retracted my comments as I was unaware that skepticism is being regarded as sarcasm and disrespect. Carry on, sorry for the mess.

    #3480637
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Ken you asked a question, or I assume there was a question in the half dozen edits in my inbox, about how many gear manufactures were making UL dome, double door, double vestibule tents. I was barely born in the eighties if you know of such tents, I’m happy to look into it.

    #3480655
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    “Danny Milks wrote:

    Thanks all for posting. My comments still go through a moderation queue because I might cause a revolution.

    Emylene, Thanks for the reply. For a tent, 45 days is a more meaningful metric than 300 miles. Glad you haven’t experienced any issues with the tent. I really like the design innovation here, and appreciate your attention to detail.

    For reference, 1200mm HH is on the very low end for waterproofness, which means this Nemo is among the least waterproof tents on the market. Despite what MSR states, there are several ultralight shelter makers who use fabrics with 3000-5500mm HH, including TarpTent, Rab, Terra Nova, and Hilleberg.

    I wonder how many tents we’ll see with 7d fabric. People complain about how a MHW Ghost Whisperer rips too easily, and that’s a down jacket (less stress) with 7d/10d hybrid fabric (potentially slightly stronger). I’ll happily stick with my Double Rainbow, which weighs about the same but is longer and taller, uses a much more robust 30d fabric, is 60% the cost of the Nemo, and is made in the USA.”

    You rebel you, Danny! ;-)

    Excellently articulated thoughts! I’ll answer you now because I have time this morning, I may not get to it later.

    I agree, actual days of usage is a much better rubric.

    I would also agree with the 1200mm being lower end. The question is how water proof does the gear user need? More waterproof usually means more condensation. 90% of the time my usage is in a dry climate, therefore 1200mm is acceptable. Though this tent performed well in a coastal application, it would not be my first choice. I’d pick some sterner stuff if coastal walking was my primary usage. RAB especially markets in the U.K. and I can totally see them needing a better HH. Nice to see a good understanding of HH from another BPLer.

    I actually think the down jacket might have more stress, branch snags etc. Once a tent is set up, aside from wind and precipitation  it’s pretty low stress. Which isn’t exactly low stress but it’s not a tearing or friction motion like a branch running across it. I’m not overly familiar with the Ghost Whisperer though, but that’s my off the cuff thought. The 7D is interesting and unexpected but totally worth a test drive. I’m going to keep experimenting with this tent and see where I get to. When I get my first repair, I’ll update the forum.

    And I totally love the Double Rainbow, it’s been on my radar for years. Excellent design.

    Em

     

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