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How Can Cheap Butane Canisters be Modified to Work With Canister Stoves?


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable How Can Cheap Butane Canisters be Modified to Work With Canister Stoves?

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #3695105
    Andrew Marshall
    Moderator

    @andrewsmarshall

    Locale: Tahoe basin by way of the southern Appalachians

    Roger Caffin discusses how you can modify and use cheap butane canisters with canister stoves in this MYOG article.

    #3695110
    Paul Wagner
    BPL Member

    @balzaccom

    Locale: Wine Country

    As an additional note, we have a small one-burner Coleman stove that uses this type of butane for fuel.   It DOES NOT work well below about 40 degrees F (4 C).  that’s a problem if you’re going to be using this fuel in the mountains, and/or any time in the shoulder seasons or winter.

    #3695384
    Rob St. John
    BPL Member

    @robstjohn

    Locale: American Intermountain West

    I wonder how many regular canisters made for my stove(s) can I purchase for the cost of a CNC lathe and bits?

    #3695394
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    use one of these

    $9.99

    transfer fuel from one of those cartidges to an empty canister and then use regular stove

    yeah, it’s a problem below about 40 F, maybe down to 32 F.  There are techniques for using at cold temperatures

    pre covid, I bought cartridges for $1.25 at the Korean grocer.  I don’t feel like shopping, so I bought 12 cartidges for $24 from amazon delivered.  That should do me more than a year.

    #3695415
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Rob Paul is quite right about cold weather. For that you need either propane/butane mixes or some very special tricks. But for summer time at low-to-medium altitudes, it’s fine.

    The little adapters Jerry showed work well. But only $2-3 from ebay, delivered. Amazon is NOT cheap!

    how many regular canisters made for my stove(s) can I purchase for the cost of a CNC lathe and bits?
    CNC lathe AND CNC mill, please.
    Sigh, yeah, but I already had the CNC machinery from stove making.
    OK, a poor excuse. How about ‘having fun’?

    Cheers

    #3695471
    Emily W
    BPL Member

    @wildflower

    Well beyond my capabilities….  are you starting a business making these?

    #3695479
    Paul Wagner
    BPL Member

    @balzaccom

    Locale: Wine Country

    I don’t think that was Rob, Roger.   :>)

    #3695541
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Sorry Paul: posting corrected.

    Emily: you don’t need one of my modified adapters if what you have is a ‘conventional’ remote canister stove with a screw-thread connector. You just need the ebay adapter.

    Cheers

    #3697240
    Bill in Roswell
    BPL Member

    @roadscrape88-2

    Locale: Roswell, GA, USA

    Great stuff Roger. You cover the loose ends. My nephew in law has a CNC and laser printer, so can have those made. However, I like Jerry’s approach – just fill a Lindle valve canister with the cheap cans (same as I used on my sailboat for years, as cold weather wasn’t an issue).

    #3697243
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    just fill a Lindle valve canister with the cheap cans
    Ahem.
    Yeah, been there, done that.
    The adapter I modified just lets me skip the refill hassles, that’s all.

    Cheers

    #3701867
    Philipp Kaiser
    BPL Member

    @philippkai1

    Liked this writeup. I had good results with the G Works Butane adapter (ebay) and the Soto Windmaster altough the O-ring had to taken out and the diameter just-so slightly reduced with some sandpaper. Use some folding feet to keep it upright. In Japan this was quite useful as the screw-canisters were not that ubiquitous as the wok canisters.

    #3716960
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    Good article

    I bought these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0022BUT2O/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    $25 for 12 cartridges, 8 ounces each

    and use this for $10 to transfer to regular canister

    When you transfer, make sure the notch on the cartridge is down, then the line will draw liquid, not gas.  For normal use, the notch should be up.

    Yeah, below 40F this fuel starts not working, although these torch lighters work pretty good

    1.3 ounces.  If your canister slows down because of cold, just put the flame on it down below

    (torch lighter idea and using to make butane work at low temps is David’s idea, not mine:)

    #3716961
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    and, if post covid I go to the Korean grocer, the cartridges are $1.25.  At H mart they’re $1.50.

    #3717025
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Yeah, Amazon prices are a bit of a rip-off. Cheaper at local hardware for the cans (AU$5 for 4), and much cheaper on ebay for the adapters.

    Cheers

     

    #3717026
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    If they deliver butane cartridges to my house it’s reasonable they have to charge a little more.

    $2 per cartridge is cheaper than good butane canisters, maybe $6 each.

    #3717036
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    The interesting thing about the cheap Korean ‘butane’ cans is that they do not contain straight n-butane (BP: 0 C). They most likely contain an equal-parts mix of n-butane (BP: 0 C) and iso-butane (BP: -12 C). Whether they contain any propane is unknown. The stuff is not highly refined.

    Cheers

    #3717038
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    based on the observed boiling temp, yeah, 50% nbutane, 50% isobutane

    as has been discussed before : )

    the mixture boils at about 21 F so it operates at maybe 26 F – slowly

    I was backpacking this winter.  23 F or so.  My stove slowed down to useless, so I used the David torch on its side.

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