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BRS-3000T – Another One Bites the Dust


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Viewing 20 posts - 76 through 95 (of 95 total)
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  • #3458166
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Hi Larry

    In the particular case I had in mind, there were some other factors coming into play, like address space, complexity and sheer volume production. Once Intel decided to mass-produce the x86 design, the other products ran into a cost wall.

    Cheers

    #3458203
    Larry De La Briandais
    BPL Member

    @hitech

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    Mine was strictly from a programming point of view.  The motorola chip was much easier to code for.  The addressing on the intel chip sucked in comparison.  Ah, the good ole days when I cared (or even knew) about such things.

    Now that is some thread drift!  ;^)

     

    #3458205
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    The Motorola architecture was copied from the PDP-11 and the VAX. Both were infinitely superior to the x86, but volume and $ won the day. And CISC was losing to RISC – not that the x86 was anywhere near RISC. VERY VERY sad. Yes, thread drift. Maybe the BRS-3000T is the ARM?

    Cheers

    #3458208
    Larry De La Briandais
    BPL Member

    @hitech

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    Ah, the PDP-11, now you really are bringing back fond memories.  That was the first real system I learned to program on.  :^)

     

    We now return you to your regularly scheduled thread…

     

     

    #3458820
    Hikin’ Jim
    BPL Member

    @hikin_jim

    Locale: Orange County, CA, USA

    lol.  And I thought my stove posts were obscure.  :)

    HJ

    #3458834
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Hi Jim
    Oh, they are, but we can be even more obscure! :)
    Cheers

    #3458837
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Yeah, segment addressing could be a bitch.

    #3458949
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Oh, VMS solved that.

    Cheers

    #3618769
    Brad W
    BPL Member

    @rocko99

    Anyone ever get sputtering from their BRS-3000 stove? Not sure if it’s clogged or another issue. Change fuel cans and no change.

    #3618773
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    ‘Sputtering’ independent of the canister? My guess, and I emphasise GUESS, is that you have a lump of dirt under the jet which is rattling around. It may not be very big.

    Mind you, what brand of canister? Some Chinese brands have a lot of muck in them. Been there, had that.

    Cheers

    #3618787
    Brad W
    BPL Member

    @rocko99

    -Roger  MSR ISOPRO and Coleman. I will try to blow some compressed air in there and see if it helps. Thanks.

    #3618788
    Jake
    BPL Member

    @jake_c

    Locale: Eastern OH

    Brad,

    I have twice in the short time I’ve had the stove. The first boil I did with it it was sputtering. I followed some instructions found here on BPL to tear it down and clean it out. Worked flawlessly after that until I screwed it onto a canister that was around 16F one morning. It was sputtering again,  but a few minutes in my pocket to warm the fuel fixed that issue.

    #3618789
    Stephen Parks
    Spectator

    @sdparks

    Locale: Southwest

    It’s an easy stove to disassemble.  Get in there!

    #3618795
    Brad W
    BPL Member

    @rocko99

    Thanks all. I will take it apart/clean and see if that fixes it.

     

    #3618801
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    I don’t think the compressed air will help unless you first remove the jet.
    I NEVER travel without a tiny spanner sized to fit the jets on my stove.

    16 F is remote inverted canister conditions imho.

    Cheers

    #3618940
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    This is what turns me off to BRS 3000T.  If I need to be able to disassemble it in the field, then maybe there’s a reliability problem.

    I’ve used Pocket Rocket, and SOTO Windmaster for years, never a hint of failure.

    I used a Whisperlight gas stove for years – the jets occasionally plugged up so I had to be able to take that apart.  That’s one of the reasons I switched to canister stoves.

    I used a Coleman Exponent F1 canister stove.  Then, it started leaking fuel around the o-rings.  I don’t know if that was user error, a problem with just that stove, or a design problem.  If they still made that stove, I might be concerned about reliability of that stove.

    Just one person’s experience

    #3618942
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    Interesting, it automatically put a link to purchase the Soto Windmaster, let’s see if it does it again : )

    #3618988
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    If I need to be able to disassemble it in the field, then maybe there’s a reliability problem.
    If the source of the problem was dirt in the canister, then you cannot blame the stove.

    Then, it started leaking fuel around the o-rings.
    Degraded O-ring. Uncommon, but possible if the surface of the canister valve in use was not smooth. Some of them tended to rust after a while, but that was variable.

    Cheers

    #3619003
    Mark Fowler
    BPL Member

    @kramrelwof

    Locale: Namadgi

    @Jerry – looks like you’ve been monetized.

    The ability to strip down a stove in the field is important as issues can arise because of the canister (dust or sharp edges) or just allowing dust into the system – these a general problems not just ones with the BRS.  With most stoves you need to strip it down when you first get it to ensure there is no fine metal particles in the works as well as breaking bonds on any threads that have been loctited so that not too much force is needed to strip in the field. A slot to handle the jet is easily carved in a spoon handle (and saves .001g). Add in a couple of O rings,a small pack of silicone grease in a section of straw and a pricker made from copper electrical wire (cut 2cm of wire and strip off 1cm of insulation) – 3 grams all up.

    #3619007
    Jon Fong
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    +1 for alcohols stoves and Esbit.

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