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Aerogel sleeves for pots/mugs


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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #3762133
    Stephane G
    BPL Member

    @gauvins

    I’ve purchased a sheet of Rova Flex aerogel. Turned out to be a very effective insulation. Only 1mm thick and pots of boiling water can be handled without any discomfort. Problem is that a reasonably priced sheet isn’t long enough to cover the pot diameter, so I currently have patches held in place by silicone bands. Even though backpacking isn’t a beauty contest for gear, I’d prefer a neat sleeve.

    Anyone has done something like that or would have suggestions?

    #3762913
    Josh J
    BPL Member

    @uahiker

    Never heard of it but very interested!

    #3762917
    Jon Fong
    BPL Member

    @jonfong

    Locale: FLAT CAT GEAR

    The largest sheet is 19.7″ x 19.7″.  that can cover a pot diameter of over 6″.  What size are you looking for?

    #3762918
    Josh J
    BPL Member

    @uahiker

    #3762958
    JCH
    BPL Member

    @pastyj-2-2

    cool material. eye-watering prices!

    #3762967
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    but the area of your cup is so small, the weight saved by using aerogel will be small.

    I use this padding from the fabric store intended to stiffen hat brims and such.  2 mm thick.  Covered in plastic tape to keep it in place.  0.25 ounces.

    You could do that with aerogel – use plastic take around the outside to keep in place

    #3763048
    Eric Blanche
    BPL Member

    @eblanche

    Locale: Northeast US

    If anyone is more well versed in Aerogel, how does it compare to some standard types of insulation r-value and weight wise? I’m thinking reflectix, eva foams 1-3mm, thinsulate, etc.

     

    I’m sure we’ve all heard the huge claims years ago but was it simply too expensive or maybe too heavy? Does it live up to its original hype?

     

    My concerns are r-value, weight, and last thickness. I currently use refletix and I don’t love the bulk.

    #3763063
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Iirc, most aerogel is rigid. Bend it and it crushes.

    Cheers

    #3763099
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    In those links it shows aerogel bent into a roll, so that wasn’t rigid

    Aerogel has some unique chemical and temperature characteristics.  And excellent insulation per thickness and per weight.  It would be good for insulation on a rocket ship.  And certain manufacturing equipment.

    From that link, $42 for a small piece big enough for one mug (?).  Let’s just say you could make a mug sleeve that weighed 1/8 ounce rather than mine that weighed 1/4 ounce.  $42 to save 1/8 ounce?  I think there are other items in your kit where you can save more weight per dollar.

    #3763111
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Ah so – it is no longer rigid. Interesting. But $$$$$

    Cheers

    #3763147
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    I had a look at the web site. The original stuff is still for sale, as a rigid board. But this new stuff, ‘blanket’, must be a bit different in composition.

    I did note that the blanket stuff emits a lot of dust, so the company says mask and gloves are required. Does not sound like something I would want in my pack.

    Cheers

    #3763159
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    “Aerogel” that’s flexible enough to roll up is a mashup of traditional polyester insulation and aerogel particles – not pure, rigid, brittle aerogel. But a few weeks ago I got curious and ran some numbers for an MYOG “aerogel” sleeping pad.

    Bottom line: “aerogel” is crazy expensive, ~$1,000 for a full-length, wide, R-5 sleeping pad (my goal), and not significantly better for backpacking than existing options.

    Threw away the numbers, so here’s what I recall:

    – An R-5 sleeping pad made with “aerogel” would be less than an inch thick, and might roll into a nice tight bundle.

    – But you are sleeping on what’s mostly an added layer of polyester insulation – not very cushy for many camps.

    – Surprise! It would weigh about the same as a lightweight R-5 sleeping pad.

    – Traditional R-values are a weird unit: degree Fahrenheit square-foot hour per BTU. Most “aerogel” makers report thermal resistance in other units that are a PITA to convert to traditional R-values. I covered several sheets of paper trying to figure out how to get from A to B. Wolfram Alpha helped some, but not enough,

    For lightweight backpackers, aerogel seems to be a product of the future – the far future.

    Except maybe pot and mug cozies.

    — Rex

    #3763993
    Josh J
    BPL Member

    @uahiker

    one thing aero gel is used in that i know of is toasty feet, shoe inserts. i also ran across someone who was selling wraps for wrists to keep hands warm for those who suffer from raynauds, he’s not in business anymore

    #3766175
    Tyler R
    BPL Member

    @trex

    Any chance you measured the weight of the sleeve you made and it’s dimensions? Trying to figure out this materials weight per square centimeter to see if itsnlighter than puting handles on some pots I’m working on.

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