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Compression socks for hiking??


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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 55 total)
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  • #1268261
    Ravn Hamberg
    Member

    @swampbuggy

    Hi

    Is any of the fastpackers/long distance hikers using compression socks? Runners are using them all the time. But do they work for hiking? Im planning a long hike with a lot of 30-40 miles days, and was wondering if i would benefit from wearing compression around the calfs. My guess is i would, but has anybody tried it?

    #1688717
    Ben Smith
    BPL Member

    @goosefeet

    Locale: Georgia

    I am not really in those categories, but I do use compression socks and feel that they really cut down on leg fatigue after a long day of up and down.

    I use the CEP Trekking compression socks.

    #1688721
    Ben Smith
    BPL Member

    @goosefeet

    Locale: Georgia

    Sorry, double post…

    #1688752
    Chris Benson
    Member

    @roguenode

    Locale: Boulder

    During a one-week trip in last year I wore my cw-x pro tights for a particularly demanding day that included bagging 3 14'ers. I liked the extra muscular support and felt they helped my recovery for the following hiking days.

    #1688769
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    I used some compression socks – Swiftwick Merino Four.

    I did 21 nights, 210 miles, wore them while I was sleeping also.

    Never had any problems with them, but I don't really need compression socks, so I quit using them. Slightly prefer non-compression socks.

    Why do you need compression socks?

    #1688787
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Forgive me if I go into rant mode, but I make no apologies.

    These are basically an extremely stupid marketing gimmick which is medically BAD. Your whole body, and especially your muscles, depend on the circulation of blood through arteries and veins and plasma/lymph through the secondary circulation system. Compression clothing will restrict this blood and lymph flow. Your extremities will suffer from decreased supply of ATP and slower removal of lactic acid. How utterly stupid!

    I tried some longs once (field trial). I got cold legs in the middle of the night due to the restricted blood flow. I got rid of them in the middle of the night and slept warm for the rest of the night.

    I also inadvertently did something similar with a restrictive watch band in the snow. My hand started to freeze. I had to take the watch off and stick it in my pocket. My hand recovered.

    So why do some people wear them? Two reasons. One – because they get them for free and are told others are wearing them. Two – because they are paid to endorse them.

    Cheers

    Edit:
    An article referenced in a subsequent post noted that most research has focused on the use of compression clothing on unhealthy people – those with vein problems etc. Fair enough, but completely irrelevant to fit healthy walkers.

    As for the manufacturers' claims … 'they would say that, wouldn't they?'

    #1688797
    Steven Paris
    BPL Member

    @saparisor

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    "These are basically an extremely stupid marketing gimmick which is medically BAD. Your whole body, and especially your muscles, depend on the circulation of blood through arteries and veins and plasma/lymph through the secondary circulation system. Compression clothing will restrict this blood and lymph flow. Your extremities will suffer from decreased supply of ATP and slower removal of lactic acid."

    It actually doesn't look like that is true, Roger. However, it doesn't seem like they would be that useful for hiking, unless you were mostly wearing them on a rest/recovery day following a hard hiking day. I don't think I would sleep in them, which may have led to the problems you had. Also, I wouldn't be inclined to wear them in the cold, where restriction might cause some serious problems. For what it's worth, I am a runner but have never worn compression socks.

    This blog seems to have a decent synopsis of where the science is on compression socks for running:

    http://www.scienceofrunning.com/2010/07/compression-socks.html

    Also, Joe Friel's blog:

    http://www2.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/10/can-your-socks-make-you-faster.html

    Edit: I forgot a word

    #1688798
    Chris Benson
    Member

    @roguenode

    Locale: Boulder

    Well, my experience with them differs. Perhaps, the jury's still out on their effects.

    This article suggests the jury is still out and notes some research that found benefits from their use.
    http://www.active.com/triathlon/Articles/The-Physiology-Behind-Compression-Clothes.htm

    #1688847
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    Like I said, I wore them at night. It got down to 28F. I didn't notice being cold.

    But then I didn't do any controlled tests or anything.

    Thanks for those links – I see what the intended purpose is – better blood flow and better recovery. I was just doing leisurely backpacking so I probably wouldn't have noticed anything.

    #1688849
    John S.
    BPL Member

    @jshann

    Betting it's more hype in healthy persons, though the muscle vibration hypothesis is interesting. Also bet the pressure of the clothing in athletes is not the same as those used for treatment of disease. It's clear (to me) that nothing has been proven, so use them at your own monetary risk.

    #1688905
    Ravn Hamberg
    Member

    @swampbuggy

    I think it looks like there may be some benefit in recovery from wearing them. But how much, and are they worth the extra weight, is very hard to say. I think i will get a pair and do some testing myself, and see if i like them.

    #1689001
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    I've been studying, and testing compression clothing (socks and leggings) for the past several months. Here are my empirical observations.

    1. You must differentiate what you feel from what you observe, and try to be rational.

    2. They don't seem to offer any benefit for most of my hiking.

    3. Wearing compression leggings increases the number of repetitions to failure when I'm doing unweighted squats. They don't impact the number of weighted squats I can do. I think this is because they offer the most benefit for high-repetition low-resistance exercise.

    4. Wearing compression leggings increases the distance I can travel in a day because I don't seem to need to rest as much and my legs fatigue less. However, we're talking about extremely long days: 16+ hours of trekking, with significant hill climbing, and a very light pack.

    4. Wearing compression socks at night seems to make my feet ache noticeably less in the morning. However, I've only observed this effect on days when I have hiked more than 20 miles over mountainous terrain.

    These are empirical observations. I'm interested in exploring compression clothing more – but only at the very limits of what I can do. I generally think they're not so helpful for routine trekking.

    I think you'll do better to increase your performance by paying attention to insulin stability over the course of a trekking day, which is my current research project, and one that's far less contaminated by manufacturer claims and sleek designs in tights :)

    #1689031
    Chris Benson
    Member

    @roguenode

    Locale: Boulder

    That pretty much parallels my experience. Benefits on long, difficult days with lots of altitude gained and lost. Regular hiking, not so much.

    #1785459
    Jessica Ruiz
    Member

    @jessie85

    Yes, compression benefits hikers as well. With the discovery of the additional benefits of compression socks and stockings today, many manufacturers of compression garments design stockings and socks not only for those suffering in medical conditions such varicose vein, thrombosis, and other vein problems, but also for athletes and active people who leisurely engage to sport activities.

    The days of wearing just ordinary sport socks to protect feet during activities from injury are over. Compression socks today are designed not only to protect feet but also to help increase blood flow in the lower legs to increase performance. The compression provided by the compression socks help you feet feel less sore and tired from a day of hiking or any sport activity. They improve the endurance and performance of athletes by providing the adequate compression.

    DELETED Spam


    Jessica
    This is your first post here and you are spamming. That is not tolerated.

    Most of what you have written flies in the face of medical facts. Compression does NOT and can NOT boost blood circulation: it is a form of mild tourniquet and that always reduces blood and lymph flow. To suggest otherwise is simply blatant marketing spin and deliberate deception.

    If you have slightly injured your muscles such that they have started to swell up, then compression does have some value as a therapy. It is part of the RICE regime: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Think of a swollen ankle after a sprain for instance.

    Yes, I have tried wearing compression clothing. I wore some tights while sleeping one night. My legs started to freeze. I removed the tights and could feel the warmth flow back into my legs as the blood flow picked up.

    Further spamming will get you banned.

    Roger Caffin
    Online Community Monitor
    Backpacking Light

    #1785896
    Ryan Krause
    Member

    @rmkrause

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    I have a pair of Smartwool compression socks that I use for recovery and the amount of compression is low enough that they are fine to sleep in. I've started/stopped "barefoot" running a number of times over the last few years and each time starting up again I would get severe calf DOMS that would in some cases last days. Using the socks however, takes care of the issue. I have been through numerous cycles of start/stop with and without using the socks and the effect is real for me. I've gotten to the point if I barefoot run I'll wear the socks for the evening/night afterwards. Hiking/backpacking on the other hand, I've never thought that I would find them useful.

    #3543419
    Ian
    BPL Member

    @10-7

    Reviving an old thread to see what the state of the market is on compression socks.  My apologies if my question here is answered in another thread, but I’m not finding it.

    I’m having difficulty dialing in my socks

    I really like the Wright socks but they tend to smell pretty bad.  They also do not last more than a season for me.

    I’m currently wearing one of the Darn Tough ankle socks but I get a pretty annoying ankle rash from them that I never get from synthetic socks.  It’s not heat rash; I speculate that it’s my skin’s reaction to the fiber.  No smell though which is nice.

    Anyone have a low odor synthetic compression sock they can recommend?

     

     

    #3543426
    Brad P
    BPL Member

    @brawndo

    My podiatrist had me use them as part of treatment for plantar fasciitis. They did seem to help reduce the pain. I don’t know if that helps for hikers without that problem.

    #3543433
    Ryan Smith
    BPL Member

    @violentgreen

    Locale: East TN

    I’ve worn CEP compression socks while running for a couple years and they’re a nice product. I’ve found that I’m a little susceptible to developing shin splints and these have worked wonders for keeping them at bay.

    Edit: I don’t know if they’re marketed as anti-stink, but I’ve never noticed a funky smell.

    Ryan

    #3543443
    M B
    BPL Member

    @livingontheroad

    I’ve never tried them.

    But from what I’ve seen, enough believe they do work that there must be something to it.

    At worst, they don’t hurt.

    Sometimes, things that shouldn’t work do work .

    Not because they’re strictly beneficial always.

    But because in certain situations they’re the lesser of two evils.

     

    #3543444
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    They were medically bad in 2011.
    They have not changed.
    Great marketing budget though.

    Cheers

    #3543459
    Ian
    BPL Member

    @10-7

    Sources Roger?

    #3543460
    Ian
    BPL Member

    @10-7

    Thanks all for the replies.

    #3543479
    Jack R. Abbit
    Spectator

    @kuhlwind

    Locale: Just over the Edge

    If you want a real world opinion. Google Baskets you tube channel. He is hiking the CDT as we speak. (30+ miles per day) He wears them. You could message him and he would get back with you.

    Beautiful scenery too !

    #3543512
    M B
    BPL Member

    @livingontheroad

    This guy uses them

    Only held AT speed record at one time 🙄

     

    Then theres this dude

    Holds current overall, supported, and unsupported AT records:

    If these guys like em, im listening.

    #3543516
    Valerie E
    BPL Member

    @wildtowner

    Locale: Grand Canyon State

    Ian — I think the best configuration for you would be to keep the socks that work for you, and just try adding some compression sleeves, which wouldn’t require (a) much investment; and (b) a change of sock-type.

    I want one of those puffy massaging cuff machines that they put on your lower legs after surgery.  Those things were sooooooo nice!

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