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TT Hogback Pictures and 1st Impressions


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Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #1256735
    Christopher Wilke
    Spectator

    @wilke7000

    Locale: Colorado

    Since there are a couple of TT Hogback threads floating around, I thought I'd add another! Took some pictures of my new Hogback last weekend and finally found time to post them. Have a look.

    Hogback 1

    Hogback 2

    Hogback 3

    Vents on each side of the pole at the apex of the tent. Also a strap with a hook that I wasn't sure its use.

    Hogback 4

    Hogback 5
    Close up of the bottom of the door.

    Hogback 6

    Hogback 7

    Hogback 9
    Elastic strap at both the foot and head of the floor can clip up to keep the floor raised.

    Hogback 8

    I didn't get any pictures with pads or people in it but my wife, 3 year old twins and myself will fit in the Hogback no problem. I'm 6'3" and had plenty of room sleeping next to the door both sitting and laying down. My girls (who are about 3ft tall) can stand up fully in the middle of the tent and were running laps with only occasional face fulls of mesh. The scale readout is a little hard to see but I get 1829g (64.5oz) for everything minus instructions.

    I've never been a fan of pole sleeves from a set up perspective and was reminded of that when I set up the Hogback. That being said, set up goes pretty quick and you're only dealing with 1 pole and sleeve. The pitchlok corners of the tent took a little getting used to but I was able to get a taught pitch without much effort. I found it was easiest to put the pole into the grommets at the end of the pole sleeve, lay the pole down, stake out both corners of one end, pull the pole upright and then stake out the other side's corners.

    I'm definitely curious how this tent will handle wind. Living in Colorado, I should find that out sooner rather than later. Not sure which side will work best pitched into the wind. It seemed like head or foot into the wind would be stiffer but it looks more aerodynamic from the the sides (doors). The pole sleeve has two guyout loops at each door and at the apex.

    I also took some video and will try to find some time to get it on my computer and up on utube.

    Overall, I think this will be a great tent for us. I think you could fit 4 adults in the Hogback, so it should last us as long as we're willing to share a tent as a family. My one reservation is how the tent will handle wind and how breezy it will be inside. We'll see how it does this summer in the mountains.

    Hope this helps anyone on the fence.

    cw

    #1588935
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    Pole sleeve.
    The easiest way is to hold the sleeve opening up and feed the pole in , pointing downwards.
    Franco

    #1588958
    Trevor Greenwood
    Member

    @skippy254

    Locale: Colorado

    Thanks for the additional info on the Hogback. I sure like the look of the tent and it seems well made from your pics. Did the tent come with lines to guy it out?

    Let us know when you post your video.

    Thanks,

    Skippy

    #1588993
    Dean F.
    BPL Member

    @acrosome

    Locale: Back in the Front Range

    The "strap with hook" that has you puzzled looks like the ones on my Moment. On the Moment they are for securing to the optional additional lengthwise pole. Is there such an optional pole for the Hogback?

    #1589005
    David Ure
    Member

    @familyguy

    I don't think there is an optional lengthwise pole. Maybe it is for additional guyouts?

    The Hogback looks huge. I would like to see something inside it for reference.

    #1589348
    Dean F.
    BPL Member

    @acrosome

    Locale: Back in the Front Range

    Aha. Maybe for doing that trick using a trek pole to tie a guyline, too?

    #1589500
    Christopher Wilke
    Spectator

    @wilke7000

    Locale: Colorado

    Busy weekend away from the computer (yay!).

    Franco,
    From reading some of your other posts on TT's, this is how I did it. It's awkward for me coming from a tent with pole clips. I had a lot more trouble getting the pole out than in. Hopefully with some practice, I'll feel more comfortable with the process.

    Trevor,
    No problem. The Hogback looks really well made to me. No extra guylines came with the tent. I'll try and get the video up this week.

    Dean,
    My guess was guyout. No optional 2nd pole as far as I know but that might be a nice addition for higher winds. Maybe unnecessary if it's stable all guyed out. When I set it up again, I'll try using them as guyout and snap some pictures.

    David,
    The Hogback is huge, especially compared to it's reasonable footprint. I do go inside the tent in my video but not sure if it gives a good idea of size. I'll try to get some more pictures with sleeping pads in it this weekend.

    Chris

    #1589510
    Rog Tallbloke
    BPL Member

    @tallbloke

    Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!

    Always push the pole out, never pull.

    #1589555
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    When I set a tent up I always (without thinking) do as listed above. Somehow when I take them down every so often I grab the pole and pull it out. Of course it usually jams in .
    Still don't know why I keep doing it.
    Franco

    #1732677
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Perhaps not listed yet at time of these other posts, but it's on the site now

    #1732811
    Andy F
    Spectator

    @andyf

    Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic

    I have a Hogback for our family of 6 (two of us sleep in a Scarp 2, or 1 of us sleeps in a Moment). We really like it. It's a true 4 person tent with the vertical side and end walls and mesh inner. There are no issues with young kids sleeping against the wall and wetting out their bag from condensation. (In my area, every shelter has condensation.)

    I think guying out those mid-panels to sticks, trees, or trekking poles is a better solution than the extra support pole. This solution weighs less and provides more support.

    Definitely make sure the main pole is guyed out if there's any kind of wind.

    #1732965
    Christopher Wilke
    Spectator

    @wilke7000

    Locale: Colorado

    TT did not have a crossing pole at the time I bought the Hogback. Dean apparently hit the nail on the head last year. I'm torn on whether the additional pole is worth the weight. I think you can get it guyed out pretty well as is but I've never had it out in an exposed area with lots of wind. After a year of use, I love how palatial this tent is (especially for a tall guy – 6'3"). I like unclipping half of the inner and having a protected area that can get wet before we're ready for bed. It's definitely helpful with young kids when it's raining. I haven't needed to yet but you could set it up without the inner if you just needed shelter from a down pour (would be similar to a mid). Lot's of room to sit around inside.

    This is also a luxury item for two tall guys to share. 33 oz each is not too shabby. Took it on a trip with my brother (also 6'3") and we had plenty of room to stretch out and keep all of our gear IN the tent. Could have probably fit another tall guy or two. Pure luxury…

    Chris

    #1733005
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    The crossing pole option is featured in the Hogback set up video (about 4m into it)
    http://www.tarptent.com/hogback.html#videos
    but you can also use trekking poles (or a stick) like this :
    Trekking pole guyout
    Franco
    [email protected]

    #1825950
    Jason Click
    Member

    @jclick

    Locale: North Florida

    I'm looking at this tent for a family tent and was wondering about the "crossing pole". I see it's an option on the order page for $18. I'm trying to figure out if it's needed. I'll be camping in the Southeast in good weather. Thanks.

    #1825960
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    It will help in strong wind and or heavy rain.
    Just as a general tip on those "pitch lock " corners, when you set up them up, have the cord fully extended and get the required tension by pulling the stake away from the shelter.
    Doing it like that will allow pulling it taut when (if) the fabric sags (rain or colder air)
    see this video :
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrxAASKe_ZI&list=UU0PuLUKvG7Fxxex5BMVK4vw&index=6&feature=plcp
    Franco

    #3607856
    TOU-47
    BPL Member

    @tou-47

    Locale: "Top-of-Utah"

    Great write up, thank you so much. Old thread I know but I’d like to hear any trail report updates from you or others after so long.

    Franco, if you are still with Tarptent (or Henry), after much diligence & research this is the tent I’m looking at the most seriously to replace my still beloved but too heavy Mountainsmith Genesee 4P (7# 5oz). When you have a moment, could you let us know if there have been any updates or changes since the beginning…what they are & when they happened.

    Thank you in advance.

    TOU

    #3607859
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    No changes that I can think of.

    Henry used his for a family vacation recently , I did not see any change nor did he make any comments about it.

    #3608053
    TOU-47
    BPL Member

    @tou-47

    Locale: "Top-of-Utah"

    Perfect…thank you!

    #3609383
    TOU-47
    BPL Member

    @tou-47

    Locale: "Top-of-Utah"

    I have just made arrangements to aquire one of these awesome tents in almost new condition. (TT HB 2018 model) So excited!

    This gentleman in the following link is obviously describing the Scarp 2.

    https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/103999/

    While I’ve not seen either in person yet, it seems to me the S2 is the 2 person version…or the HB is the 4 person version of the S2. So on that note, it would also seem that you can do the same things with the HB without the inner… especially in winter. Correct?

    I’m wondering with the extra space, that it would make HB larger (usable) inside therefore would sleep 4 more easily…maybe even 5? Not bad for a tent (tarp only) that may likely weighs under 3#!?

    Which brings me to a few thoughts & questions. How much do each of the individual components weigh for each of these tents? (I can’t seem to find it on the TT site.) Also on that note, with the S2 being 3.25# & the HB around 4#…besides the smaller footprint of the S2, ( advantageous at times I guess) the HB seems the better bargain when it comes to weight & cost ratios. I wonder which sells more?

    I’m still deciding on my lighter weight 1-2P solo tent but am thrilled with the thoughts of the HB as my 2-4P +3 season tent. (Likely max of 3P)

    All the best!

    TOU

    #3609393
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    Yes you can pitch the Hogback fly only.
    The partial solid inner is listed at 28 oz so I would think the mesh inner is about 25-26 oz.
    You don’t gain much internal space at all by having it fly only.

    #3609395
    TOU-47
    BPL Member

    @tou-47

    Locale: "Top-of-Utah"

    The partial solid inner is listed at 28 oz so I would think the mesh inner is about 25-26 oz.

    Thx so much Franco, I appreciate it. So minus the inner it is likely in the 2.5# range…that is amazing.

    You don’t gain much internal space at all by having it fly only.

    Ahh…yeah that makes sense. Great picture; thank you.

     

     

    Thx so much Franco, I appreciate it

     

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