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Want stove that can boil H2O in a wide-mouth stainless steel bottle


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Viewing 21 posts - 26 through 46 (of 46 total)
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  • #2188914
    Roleigh Martin
    BPL Member

    @marti124

    Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group

    Thanks everyone for your input. I've reached out to Traildesigns to see what they suggest for a Caldera windscreen. I'll let you know how it goes with the solution I get. Stability of the pot is important. No desire to get scalded with boiled water!

    #2188925
    jimmer ultralight
    Spectator

    @jimmer

    Roleigh,

    If you are going to use an upright cannister stove, NOTHING Trail Deigns makes will help the stability of your bottle on the burner. Sorry.

    Their windscreens are designed for Alcohol,Solid fuels and Wood.

    Some folks have safely used Caldera Cones as windscreens for REMOTE cannister stoves sround the burner and pot only, but you CANNOT safely use one with an upright cannister stove unless you want to blow yourself sky high . If the windscreen.touches the pot enough to support it, it WILL trap heat around tge cannister and then -KABOOM !

    FWIW, even a top heavy unit like a Jetboil ,Windboiler etc that locks the pot into the burner and has a cannister stand can STILL be tipped over. It's called gravity (and sometimes it is a real bisch).

    You will be fine with your bottle even without the training wheels;) Just make sure no matter what stove you use, you select a level surface and be careful.

    #2188930
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    > Stability of the pot is important.
    You get this stability by sitting the canister on a small bit of RIGID 3-ply. Some have used foam as a base instead, but foam is NOT all that stable compared to plywood.

    Cheers

    #2188937
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    +1 on a square of 1/8" plywood.

    Much more stable on a rough surface and easier to shim level than tge stove itself.

    PM if you want me to mail you a piece.

    #2188939
    Dale Wambaugh
    BPL Member

    @dwambaugh

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    What are you doing to your bottles?

    I've long been a fan of the idea of using a wide mouth metal bottle for a pot too, butvit really onlycworks when you are cooking near a water source. I think it makes a great survival kit container. It would be interesting to see a hard anodized aluminum version. The "BOT" is made by Vargo and is the epitome of this concept, but MSRP is $100, which cools my enthusiasm.

    H2GO is one bottle maker that has offered a light stainless bottle and the lid can be removed. They are hardcto find.

    My thought was always based on survival and heating water in a campfire. I would try a Starlyte stove with a built in stand. I wouldn't try to boil a full liter at once.

    #2188953
    Dan Yeruski
    BPL Member

    @zelph

    Locale: www.bplite.com

    Watch how stable the giga power stove is on Shug's head in this video:

    YouTube video

    #2189112
    Joe S
    BPL Member

    @threeridges

    What about this instead of plywood, you can shim one of the three points if necessary. Works well for me:

    #2189124
    Bob Gross
    BPL Member

    @b-g-2-2

    Locale: Silicon Valley

    Similar to plywood for this purpose, I've always used a small square of Masonite.

    –B.G.–

    #2189150
    Mark V.
    BPL Member

    @room210

    Locale: Northern California

    Just a quick comment: It may be more beneficial to refer to Masonite as "hardboard" or "HDF" (i.e. high-density fiberboard) as Masonite no longer makes "Masonite" since they focus on doors. (Of course, you could say door skin, but that may be misleading also).

    Only a suggestion.

    Having said that, I agree that HDF would be great for this purpose.

    #2189211
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    My issue with high-denisty fiberboard is that is it, well, as they say, high-density. Any hardboard or plywood is plenty stiff enough to support a kilogram or two. Stability comes from area, not mass. 1/8" plywood weighs less than hardboard.

    I'd also consider a 6" x 6" square of waxed cardboard. Similar weight. Free (behind any grocery store). Multipurpose as it makes an excellent fire starter, if needed.

    #2189225
    Roleigh Martin
    BPL Member

    @marti124

    Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group

    One can typically get free plywood scraps at Home Depot, how much of a diameter of the 1/8" plywood do you suggest (Do you recommend a shape of a circle or square)? How much weight are we talking about?

    Thanks

    #2189226
    Roleigh Martin
    BPL Member

    @marti124

    Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group

    Tim, the stainless steel bottles typically are unbranded. They're sold by the manufacturer direct to the Ebay customer. I've purchased 3 so far. They appear to all be made by the same company, some come in different tints. All have the same lid. I gave the link to one. You do a ebay search for stainless steel wide-mouth 1 liter bottle non-insulated and scroll through the list when you see what obviously looks like a Nalgene shaped bottle.

    What is a BOT?

    I expect to remove the lid when boiling water, I don't want the plastic to melt.

    #2189231
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    > how much of a diameter of the 1/8" plywood do you suggest
    Just a bit bigger than the base of the canister (or spread of the canister support legs) maybe? 5" x 5" should be fine. 6" x 6" should be overkill imho.

    Circle or square? Yes. :-)

    Cheers

    #2189243
    Dave Grey
    BPL Member

    @dapperdave

    #2189265
    John Higgins
    BPL Member

    @sliggins1483

    before i got into backpacking i used klean kanteen stainless steel bottles because they fit in my bicycle water bottle cage, for cooking and bicycle travel. you are right with taking the plastic of for cooking but i still would want a lid to save on fuel and time. the solid fuel adapter from clickstand was the perfect size for my klean kanteen bottle. i just picked up an imusa mug just for fun because it was there in the store project. i sat a nido (dry milk) container on top and looks like the bottom metal will make a good lid when i finish the nido, just a fyi that lids can be made from all different materials around. i'd also be tempted to make a hanging wind screen to save on fuel and boil times for iso stove. i don't have a recommendation for stove or bottle these are just a few things i would do if i was going in the direction you are and hope there useful to you. link for diy hanging wind screen

    YouTube video

    #2189323
    Tim Zen
    Spectator

    @asdzxc57

    Locale: MI

    Have you done a comparison of boil time with your bottle versus a cup or mug?

    #2189351
    Nick Gatel
    BPL Member

    @ngatel

    Locale: Southern California

    Roleigh,

    The boss said I had to be home for Easter dinner, so I spent some time out in the garage taking some pictures for you.

    First, the picture of the bottle you posted looks like it is taller and narrower than a Nalgene. Have you measured it? I have a couple Kleen Kateen steel bottles for my bike and they are narrower than a Nalgene.

    I only have 3 modern canister stoves; a Snow Peak GigaPower, and Snow Peak LiteMax, and a MSR WindPro II. I took several pictures of each with a Nalgene on them.

    The GigaPower is just under 3 ounces, the LiteMax just under 2 ounces, and the WindPro ~ 7 ounces with windscreen.

    snow peak 1
    GigaPower (L) and LiteMax (R)

    snow peaks

    GigaPower (L) and LiteMax (R)

    windproof 1

    WindPro II

    The reason I included the WindPro, is because of your narrow bottle, you don't want to run a stove full blast and the Snow Peaks are difficult to use in any kind of wind.

    Snow Peak makes a wind screen for only the GigaPower, which is 2 ounces — almost as heavy as the stove. Many people have posted DIY screens on BPL. Snow Peak doesn't make a windscreen for the LiteMax.

    Below are a couple pictures of the GigaPower with the screen.

    snow peak windscreen 1

    snow peak windscreen 2

    Here are all 3 stoves so you can see the pot supports:

    3 stoves -1

    3 stoves 2

    For a comparison, here are pictures with a MSR Titan Kettle (800ml) about 4.5 ounces and a Toakes (550ml) at 3 ounces.

    titanium pots

    I would not be comfortable using a tall narrow pot on any of these stoves because it will be easy to tip over. With only 3 supports, the bottles were more stable on the LiteMax and the WindPro. If I were to use your bottle, I would take the WindPro because it will do much better in even a slight breeze using the windscreen.

    Water bottles in general. I have many years of use with several Platys and that is what I would take. Are you looking at a wide mouth to make it easier to fill it? A small Ti pot to pour into a Platy would probably be an overall lighter solution.

    Anyway, I hope the pictures will help you make your decision.

    #2189372
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Hi Roleigh, How are the knees doing?

    As you know the small bottom will cause overall heating problems with any type of stove except some of the narrow focus style stoves like the Gigapower, Coleman F-1, FMS-300t or the like. But these stoves are not optimized to support narrow pots like your stainless steel bottle. They are close to the tipping point as is. And you would require a low heat setting for any reasonable efficiency.

    I believe you might be able to use some of the remote canister stoves, despite having wide burner heads, with a cone. Contact Rand/Russ at Trail Designs and see how high they can make a cone. Then with a remote canister as a heat source, you can use a "beer band" to position the bottle in the cone at about 1/2" to 3/4"(not really sure on this since it changes between stoves) above the head. If you can cover 60-70% of the bottle with exhaust gasses before venting them to the outside, you should get a pretty good efficiency, even from a wider stove head.

    (They will likely complain about unsafe gas buildups…they will do it, at least they used to.)

    #2189373
    Ken Thompson
    BPL Member

    @here

    Locale: Right there

    Late to this party Nick.

    Roleigh, the spare stove is boxed up and will be in the post tomorrow. Let us know how it works out.

    #2237416
    Don Morris
    Member

    @hikermor

    Thank heavens for BPL! Without it, I would have never known that my Pocket Rocket, which I have used satisfactorily for at least the last ten years, SUCKS. It helps if you place the pot on the center of the pot supports…….

    #3383491
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    If you want to hear the woodpeckers peckeringing and the loons looning, use a Fancee Feest alcohol stove for small diameter containers…also the Venom Super Stove ;-) I have a vested interest in them.

    YouTube video

    http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/super-stove.php

     

Viewing 21 posts - 26 through 46 (of 46 total)
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