Introduction

The Enlightened Equipment Torrid Apex Pullover (7.7 oz / 219 g, MSRP $175.00) is a synthetic-fill, high loft insulating garment.

Its materials and construction are similar to the full-zip Enlightened Equipment Torrid Apex Jacket. This review will not focus on the comprehensive details of design, materials, and construction, as that information was presented in our review of the Torrid Apex Jacket. Instead, this review will focus on the usability of the pullover design.

This Limited Review is based on my experience with it over the course of more than 60 user days while hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, and backpacking in Southeast Wyoming and Northern Colorado.

Features and Specifications

  • Weight: 7.72 oz (219 g) – the actual measured weight of my pre-production sample (Men’s Size M)
  • Fill: 2 oz/yd² Climashield Apex synthetic insulation
  • Fabric: Ultralight ripstop nylon fabric with DWR (options for 7D, 10D, or 20D fabrics in various colors)
  • Marsupial (“kangaroo”) front pocket (insulated on both sides)
  • 1/2 length front zipper for ventilation
  • Raglan style sleeves to increase comfort and range of motion
  • Elastic cuffs
  • Adjustable shock cord for waist hem (tucked inside front pouch)
  • Adjustable hood
  • Made in USA (Winona, Minnesota)

Description of Field Experience

I don’t have any experience using the Torrid Apex Pullover in “summer” conditions in the U.S. Mountain West, where I live and do most of my hiking. Based on my experience in inclement conditions during the other three seasons (fall, winter, and spring) in Wyoming and Colorado, I have no reason to believe that the Torrid Apex Pullover wouldn’t make a fine summer insulating layer anywhere in the Continental U.S.

man using an ice screw to drill through a frozen stream surface
Using an ice screw to drill through the surface of a frozen stream on my quest to find water. On this day, where temperatures hovered near 0 F (-18 C), I appreciated the looser fit of the pullover, which allowed me to layer it over other insulating layers.

My experience with the Torrid Apex Pullover includes more than 60 user days in the following contexts:

  • as a worn and at-rest insulating layer for done-in-a-day winter activities (snowshoeing, skiing, and hiking) in temperatures down to minus 5 F (-15 C); and
  • as my primary at-rest/in-camp insulating layer for multi-day backcountry trips in temperatures down to 15 F (-9 C).

I have extensive experience with the Torrid Apex Pullover:

  • in high winds (while trekking, at rest, and in camp);
  • as an outer layer in heavy snowfall (while trekking, at rest, and in camp); and
  • as an insulating layer to complement my sleep system at night.

For additional context, here are three examples of how I integrated the Torrid Apex Pullover into my clothing and sleep systems in more extreme conditions:

Scenario: Day Trip – Snowshoeing in a Blizzard

  • Environmental Conditions: Temps 0 to 10 F (-18 to -12 C), Winds 10 to 30 mph (16 to 48 kph)
  • Torso Clothing Worn While Trekking: 150-weight merino hoody, lightly-insulated softshell jacket, Torrid Apex Pullover

Scenario: Overnight Bivy in Exposed Blizzard

  • Environmental Conditions: Temps 15 to 25 F, (-9 to -4 C) Winds 5 to 15 mph (8 to 24 kph)
  • Torso Clothing Worn: 150-weight merino hoody, lightly-insulated softshell jacket, Torrid Apex Pullover
  • Sleep System: 20 F (-7 C) down sleeping bag, 50 F (10 C) synthetic overbag, waterproof-breathable bivy sack
man in bivy sack during a snow storm
Enjoying a blizzard during a Wyoming winter bivy.

Scenario: Cooking In Camp During a Storm

  • Environmental Conditions: Temps 15 to 25 F (-9 to -4 C), Winds 20 to 25 mph (32 to 40 kph)
  • Torso Clothing Worn: 150-weight merino hoody, lightly-insulated softshell jacket, Torrid Apex Pullover, waterproof-breathable shell jacket

Performance Summary

Weight & Warmth

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