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Home Forums Tarptent Sublite Tent Review

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  • #1233062

    Addie Bedford
    BPL Member

    @addiebedford

    Locale: Montana

    Companion forum thread to:

    Tarptent Sublite Tent Review

    #1468467

    Joe Clement
    BPL Member

    @skinewmexico

    Locale: Southwest

    Am I the only person who would like to see a hybrid version of this? I'd like to see the horizontal panels on top made from something impermeable (spinnaker, etc.), and the side panels out of tyvek. With a screen door, of course……

    #1468473

    Anonymous

    Wow! This just never occurred as a possibility. Great idea!

    #1468476

    Scott Smith
    BPL Member

    @mrmuddy

    Locale: No Cal

    Again, throw in a Vesitbule and I'll buy one …. yesterday !

    #1468479

    Robert Blean
    BPL Member

    @blean

    Locale: San Jose -- too far from Sierras

    Looks as if room could be improved at minimal weight by putting a short carbon fiber rod horizontally between the hiking pole tips. Perhaps that could change the geometry in a way that would allow Will's fixed-length poles. Useful idea? Creeping featurism?

    #1468485

    John Haley
    Member

    @quoddy

    Locale: New York/Vermont Border

    I received my modified silnylon SubLite back from Henry this morning. The change from a .75" apex attachment point to a 1.5" should make a major strength improvement when used in heavy snow or very, very high wind. I'd estimate that the weight difference is only 1 or, at the very most, 2 grams. It's my understanding that is to be the standard size for future production.

    Love this TT.

    #1468486

    Joe Clement
    BPL Member

    @skinewmexico

    Locale: Southwest

    Creeping featurism. Great term.

    #1468524

    Tony Beasley
    BPL Member

    @tbeasley

    Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle

    Wills review was very good but it did not mention what the Sublite is like in windy conditions.

    As I am looking at the Sublite as a possible 4 season tent, I would like how it handles strong winds strong winds.

    Tony

    #1468531

    Anonymous

    An examination of design and actual use reveals that an extra pole horizontally between the two support poles would be completely superflous. The tent pitches tight and the tyvek model, at least, experiences no sag or droop with damp cool air. There is ample room for a single ample sized adult hiker without slightest feeling of being cramped. There would be no experiential enhancement resulting from an extra pole. There is a bird's eye photo looking straight down on the tent showing the design outline in the review which might illustrate this.

    #1468539

    Casey Bowden
    BPL Member

    @clbowden

    Locale: Berkeley Hills

    John,

    I agree that the existing Sublite doesn't need a strut similar to the Rainbow to increase headroom. However, do you think a strut could be used to increase the Sublite to a 2-person shelter? I think so, and bet it would be well under 2 pounds.

    #1468555

    Anonymous

    Casey,

    There sure would room enough for that little darling on your shoulders but the peak design of the of the Sublite would require some major design alteration to accomodate two adults, in my opinion anyway.

    #1468559

    t.darrah
    BPL Member

    @thomdarrah

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Go with duel doors and a single interior center pole, design done. Peak height would likely need to be raised for additional width when sitting upright.

    #1468565

    Joe Clement
    BPL Member

    @skinewmexico

    Locale: Southwest

    Every time people add dual doors and a vestibule to the Sublite, I get a picture in my mind of a…………Double Rainbow.

    #1468567

    t.darrah
    BPL Member

    @thomdarrah

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I would leave the TT lineup as is. I feel that the options desired by most are well covered by the shelters now offered.

    #1468589

    Scott Smith
    BPL Member

    @mrmuddy

    Locale: No Cal

    Sure .. I'll take a Rainbow …. In Tyvek !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    #1468609

    Dondo .
    BPL Member

    @dondo

    Locale: Colorado Rockies

    Nicely balanced review, as usual, Will.

    I was initially more attracted to the Tyvek version but this statement gives me pause:

    >>During a high intensity thunderstorm, I saw water droplets forming on the inside walls of the canopy that dripped onto me and my gear. The problem was accentuated by "condensation splatter" caused by hail impacting the outside of the tent.

    Based on your use, would you say that the silnylon version would be more appropriate for the kind of thunderstorms we get in the Colorado high country? Thanks.

    #1468612

    James Lantz
    Member

    @jameslantz

    Locale: North Georgia

    I have used my Sublite Tyvek on one 2 day trip thus far and can report its wind worthiness is excellent. Haven't had it in rain yet but it seems to me that due to its horizontal orientation, the only panel that would leak when "wetted out" is the one spanning from the apex to the rear carbon fiber struts. The other panels are quite steep & it would seem that water would just wick down the sides & drip off the lower edges. Has anyone considered using something like Scotchguard just on the one horizontal panel? This would be an easier, less expensive variation of Joe's idea of "hybrid" panels & would presumably not alter the tent's breathability that much. Any thoughts or comments?

    #1468626

    Anonymous

    I would like to hear more from Will regarding water dripping through. As you might know, this is not consistent with my usage which includes both rain and hail. The last storm using the PROTOTYPE TySub was in November consisting of approximately 6 hours of moderately heavy rain. The tent walls not only did not drip but were dry to the touch during the rain and there was no condensation. Following this VERY FAVORABLE TEST RESULT I bought and paid for a production model of the tent. Apparently, from Will's experience and from reports from folks in the NW, certain conditions will not resist penetration of precipitation.

    #1468645

    Scott Smith
    BPL Member

    @mrmuddy

    Locale: No Cal

    I'll echo John's experience..

    I spent a full day in constant rain in my Sublit Tyvek .. with ZERO condensation issues..

    Granted . it was August . in the Sierras .. at @ 9000 feet .. However, again ( sorry guys /… for my contsant whining on this subject ) the only thing I missed was a vestibule to store gear / cook my dinner in ..

    #1468660

    Pedro Arvy
    BPL Member

    @pedroarvy

    Locale: Melbourne

    If you have adjustable trekking poles and get the sil nylon version, it seems this would turn the Sublite into a highly recommended shelter. Is that right?

    Some performance comparisons with the Contrail would be good – which one of these shelters should a hiker buy?

    #1468690

    Will Rietveld
    BPL Member

    @williwabbit

    Locale: Southwest Colorado

    Hi all, my responses to Sublite questions:

    Dondo: Regarding the Tyvek Sublite leaking in an intense thunderstorm, I submitted a video documenting that, but for some reason it did not get included in the published review. High impact rain/hail does seem to force water through the Tyvek, so it does leak under those conditions. The impact of large raindrops and hail splatters the condensation on the inside, and gear inside gets pretty damp. Note that this occurs only under high impact rain/hail and not necessarily in a gentle prolonged rain. Henry's statement regarding this is accurate.

    Petras: I would give the silnylon Sublite a Recommended rating, not HR, because the rain flap as presently designed does not allow the zippered mesh door to completely close. Henry is working on a modification. The lack of a true entry vestibule is a drawback, but that becomes an individual decision based on individual needs. If an entry vestibule is an important factor, then I suggest getting the Contrail instead, and it readily sets up with fixed length trekking poles.

    Best wishes, and happy new year!
    Will

    #1468701

    Dondo .
    BPL Member

    @dondo

    Locale: Colorado Rockies

    Thanks for your response, Will. I think I'll stick with silnylon.

    #1468729

    Tim Heckel
    Spectator

    @thinair

    Locale: 6237' - Manitou Springs

    I've had damaged pole grips from critters chewing on them at ground level.
    I pitch my Contrail with the grips up, tips in the ground.
    Can the poles be reversed in the SubLite?
    Tim

    #1468731

    John Haley
    Member

    @quoddy

    Locale: New York/Vermont Border

    Tim… No they can't be reversed in the SubLite. The tips have to be used in the apex and the handles fit in the adjustable ground "pouch".

    Zip Pulls on Sublite

    #1468732

    Henry S
    BPL Member

    @07100

    Actually, trekking poles can be reversed. The Sublite Sil ships with grommets inside the ground level pole handle adapters (to support the optional replacement pole set). The first iteration of the Sublite (tyvek) didn't ship with those grommets but we added them if the Sublite was ordered with the optional pole set. The new production run will ship with grommets. The issue for both the Sublite and Sublite Sil is the apex where both models ship with a sleeve adapter that is designed to accept trekking pole tips or the end of the (thin) optional poles. However, that adapter clips to the apex and is completely detachable. One can easily make a new one that accepts trekking pole handles (or ask us to do it at purchase time).

    -H

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