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yet another cold weather stove solution


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Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) yet another cold weather stove solution

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  • #3806501
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    there are many ways to get a canister stove to work in the cold – mulder strip, inverted stove, dish of water,…

    A while ago I showed a heat reflector which someone tried and failed to get to work so that must be a bad idea

    Here’s another version:

    My butane has a boiling point of about 22F – that is, when it’s that temperature and you turn it on, no fuel comes out

    When I warmed it up a little with a lighter, I could get a little fuel to flow.  Then I put it in the windscreen and turned it on.  It started feebly, but then gradually increased until it was going strong by the time my water boiled

    heat from the burner is reflected onto the bottom of the canister which warms up

    aluminum flashing – 1.3 ounces

    a small piece of aluminum foil underneath – 0.01 ounce

    compared to dish of water – that will work at any temperature if you have a little liquid water.  Add a little of your heated water to the dish as you go to keep it warm.  This method will work at the coldest temps.

    all the other methods are pretty similar – you have to externally warm the canister to a few degree F above it’s boiling temperature

    with an unmodified canister stove, it will cool down as much as 10F while it’s burning, from evaporative cooling, so the air temperature must be at least 10F above it’s boiling temperature

    isobutane boiling temperature – 11F

    cheap butane boiling temperature – about 22F

    #3806607
    Albin Zuccato
    BPL Member

    @zuheal

    Interesting setup. Just a question.

    I am not sure about the US but in Europe a normal gas canister has a blend of 30/70 propane to butane/isobutan. Propane has the early boilingpoint (-42,25 C or -44,5 F). Heating the canister with a lighter I guess is likely to evaporate mostly propane and little butan. This increase will increase the pressure gas becomes accessible for combustion (burning). I would assume that by getting the flame goind one gets heat down to the canister to keep the propane evaporation going as it needs less heat. Are you sure that you also have butan/isobutan evaporation going on with your setup?

    If not, this would mean that one is likely to deplete the propane over time. As a result a “fresh” canister can work for some time with only a minor temeprature increase. But at some point in time propane will be depleted and then either you have enough temperature that the butan (and isobutan) evaporates or your flame stops. If done on short trips and on purpose this can work (have some canisters at home which I will consume in summer where the butan works just fine).

    #3806616
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    yeah, good point

    I use “cheap butane” that has no propane in it – about 50% isobutane and 50% nbutane

    I agree with what you said – propane evaporates off more initially, so when you’ve used half the fuel, there’s little propane left.

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