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Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #3646332
    Jonathan Skiles
    BPL Member

    @jonskiles

    I am hiking the Sierra High Route starting in mid August. We are planning on three weeks with a few resupplies. I would love any comments or input on the attached gear list. Thanks.

    #3646333
    Jonathan Skiles
    BPL Member

    @jonskiles

    #3646529
    Cameron M
    BPL Member

    @cameronm-aka-backstroke

    Locale: Los Angeles

    There is really nothing specific equipment-wise to the SHR vs other situations. Ideally the base weight could go down at least 2 lbs. A different pack could be less than 22 oz, and the BV 450 is both heavy and won’t allow you many days without resupply. With those short outings, I would not carry both a 10000 and solar. Both the pad and pillow weigh more than I am used to- even sticking with an x-therm, which I increasingly do.

    BTW, there may be a lot of fires this year. The constant smoke makes one feel quite ill.

     

    #3646543
    Jonathan Skiles
    BPL Member

    @jonskiles

    Thanks. Those are good suggestions. On the BV450, what replacement do you suggest? I would love to go with an Ursack or something other than a canister, but a canister is required along most of the route. Thanks again for the input.

    #3646546
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I think the obvious answer is a Bearikade but YMMV. The model depends on how many days between resupplies and how much food you carry. I can get my food down to ~1 liter/day so that’s 6 or 7 days for me in a Scout.

    http://www.wild-ideas.net/the-scout/

    #3646555
    Mandarin
    Spectator

    @mandarin

    <p style=”text-align: center;”>Why not bv500</p>

    #3646572
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    BV500 is a good choice too. I actually prefer the rounded corners of Bearvaults over Bearikades but you can’t beat the weight or ease of opening on the latter. They are pricey for sure but they rent… Lots of pros/cons.

    #3646574
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    Jonathan, I did not have a positive experience on the JMT with a Suntactics solar panel used without a battery. I urge you to test that out quite a bit before committing. Tons has been written about panels and batteries and you could easily start a thread based on this one topic. My personal strategy is to minimize battery usage and recharge using a battery because I know it works.

    If I was going to try and rely on a panel I would go with something that has more than 5W of output because you only get that output when you have ideal conditions. I found that being a little off axis or having even light, wispy clouds would trigger my iPhone to shut the recharge cycle off/on resulting in a net power loss.

    One common strategy is to utilize a small “lipstick” battery bank plugged into a small panel and let it charge slowly all day with the panel hanging off your pack. I think this is ~3 ounces well spent if you are going to use a panel.

    #3646575
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I would never bring insulated pants and a 20° quilt unless you are very prone to getting very cold and spending a lot of time hanging out at night. I tend to hike until bedtime and then I just collapse into my bivy/shelter. I don’t spend much time lounging around camp.

    Overall I think you are being far too conservative with insulated pants, the quilt, XTherm pad… Unless you get cold a lot.

    #3646577
    Russ W
    BPL Member

    @gatome83

    Locale: Southeastern US

    Good list. I’m jealous! You could tweak here and there but a pretty good list.

    Where is your stove or are you going stoveless?

    Here’s a question for all…not a fan of the solar charging with the current offerings..maybe we’ll  get there, and I see where you scratched the Anker off. For an extended trip with resupply, can you mail fully charged battery banks, or is that forbidden by the USPS? For this or for a thru hike, could you simply swap out a fresh batt and mail the discharged home?

    #3646589
    Jonathan Skiles
    BPL Member

    @jonskiles

    I have been going back and forth between the Anker and the solar panel. These comments make me lean more towards the Anker. The EE Torrid pants don’t weigh more than what I normally would take as a base layer long john bottom. Since I am hiking in running shorts, having something to put on the legs on cold mornings or evenings seemed like a good idea. Maybe that is too conservative. I will have to mull that one over. Thanks for all the comments. This is exactly what I need!

    #3646610
    JB
    Spectator

    @ochotona

    Yeah, unless you sleep really cold, ditch a lot of the heavy insulation.  I did the SHR in 2011 which was a very high snow year, and we made a point of sleeping on top of many passes (Mather, Muir etc) and I was more than happy with only having tights, shorts, a 30 degree bag, and a 3/4 length z-rest.

    Also, it’s the Sierra! Rain Pants? Heck no!  On over 500 days in the backcountry in the Sierra, I have only ever carried shell pants between October-May.  Otherwise you should either be moving and warm enough, or in a shelter if it’s that nasty.

    As for food storage/ bear cans – I have personally had a bear shred an Ursack in Yosemite that only had crumbs and two Via packs in it…  They are smart and very habituated, so while bear cans suck, it’s not worth the risk.

    #3646668
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    You could save almost a pound by simply not taking a phone and recharger.

    I understand the phone is your camera and perhaps navigation. How about one person in your group carrying a phone and charger?

    #3646774
    Cameron M
    BPL Member

    @cameronm-aka-backstroke

    Locale: Los Angeles

    Renting or buying a Bearikade is the obvious best solution. If you get a large one you can always stuff it with other items if you don’t need that many days from it. Ursacks are not legal over the length of the SHR.

    No way you would want to go only solar. The battery…just works. In my experience, solar is only beneficial for extended trips where charing a battery might be a problem, of timing, of access. With solar, iffy cloudy days, or broken wire, or whatever, it is not worth the stress and its weight benefits even in ideal circumstances are marginal.

    Much of this advice comes from experience. If that experience is lacking, it is reasonable to consider several off-trail outings before jumping into the SHR. It is not just about equipment lists; things can go seriously bad very suddenly off-trail at high altitudes.

    #3646780
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    Cameron, I’d be interested to hear more about the experiences your are referencing. I have enjoyed your trip reports and photographs in the past but I don’t recall things going bad.

    My main concerns are storms and lightning because they are out of my control. A secondary concern is terrain, unstable rock and loss of traction on snow. I feel like these dangers can be mitigated with conservative judgement. Perhaps that is a naive assumption.

     

     

    #3646824
    Jonathan Skiles
    BPL Member

    @jonskiles

    We are definitely taking the off trail aspect of the SHR seriously. I agree that experience is important. I am lucky enough to have the Sierras in my backyard. Even with over 40 years exploring the area between Whitney and Yosemite, the SHR still commands a huge amount of respect and caution. I truly appreciate the help with the gear shakedown.

    #3647032
    Cameron M
    BPL Member

    @cameronm-aka-backstroke

    Locale: Los Angeles

    Hi Matthew

    The topic of off-trail dangers probably warrants a new thread. I will give it some more thought.

    Simply put, when off-trail, at high-altitude, and alone, every mishap becomes way more life-threatening. Get suddenly drenched? Try drying out and warming up when the sun goes down and it drops below freezing. Lost your way, and your light stops working? Bivouac the night on a narrow ledge on a cliff and hope you won’t roll off. Snow crust gives out, you slip and fall fast and madly and you have to actually depend on the ice axe to stop you from certain death? That one will wake you up for sure.

    #3647322
    Eric Blumensaadt
    BPL Member

    @danepacker

    Locale: Mojave Desert

    Very good list and well thought out. I like your list because it has necessary gear, not a tiny “survival list”.

    I’ve lightened up considerably with:

    PACK-> Osprey EXOS 58

    TENT-> TT Notch Li & 4 MSR Ground Hog stakes (CF hiking poles)

    SLEEP SYSTEM-> WM Megalite Mummy (overstuffed to 20 F.) and REI FLASH Insulated mattress (15 oz.)

    COOK SYSTEM-> T.D. Sidewinder ti cone stove & ESBIT tablets W/ BGET tablet holder, 3 cup Open Country anodized aluminum pot and DIY lid and pot gripper, Lexan long spoon and tiny 2 oz. Gerber lock blade knife

    WATER-> SteriPen Adventurer, Katadyn tablets, Camelbak 2 L. hydration bladder and bike bottle

    Not much else I need or even want.

     

    #3648538
    Adrian Griffin
    BPL Member

    @desolationman

    Locale: Sacramento

    Home-made tooth powder instead toothpaste is a weight saver and doesn’t have to go in your bear hang. See my note under the the Repackaging Items thread.

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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