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Shakedown Sierra Nevada in September?


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  • This topic has 20 replies, 11 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by jscott.
Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #3723813
    Christopher R
    BPL Member

    @chrisr18

    This is my gear list for a mid-September hike in the Sierra Nevada (North Lake/South Lake Loop trail; 6 days)  Any suggestions would be helpful.  My main concern is warmth.  I am a hot sleeper, generally, but I don’t want to grossly underestimate the cold.  I was previously going to bring a 30 degree back, but BPL members suggested the 22.

    https://lighterpack.com/r/kc3zoh

    #3723817
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Yeah, in Sept. at those elevations you want the 22 degree bag.

    when you check the weather beforehand, just make sure that you check incoming over those days from both west AND east. They will likely be different forecasts. Unless there’s no real weather, in that case you’re golden! And there may well not be!

    #3723818
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    12 baby wipes = .3 ounces and toilet paper = 5 ounces? This seems off and if it’s correct maybe you should just take a couple dozen baby wipes.

    #3723845
    Paul Wagner
    BPL Member

    @balzaccom

    Locale: Wine Country

    Yep.  Mid-September can get quite cold, including snow (we can only hope in this drought year!). I would be worried about warmth with this list.

    #3723870
    Erik G
    BPL Member

    @fox212

    Locale: Central Coast

    I’d opt for the 22 for the additional safety margin and given your jacket choice. I think you’ll be plenty warm. List looks solid otherwise.

    That is a beautiful area and a great time to visit it. I’m more than a little jealous! Have fun!!

    #3723880
    Axel J
    BPL Member

    @axel-t

    Mosquitos will not be and issue in September so leave the head netting at the trailhead. Maybe even sub out most of the rain gear for a puffy jacket, its always cold at night and the nights are getting longer by then.

    #3723897
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    I too would choose the KG Flex 22. Also, I’d want a warmer sleeping pad that late in the season. The S2S Ether Light XT only has a 1.2 R-value.

    Otherwise, looks good.

     

    #3723913
    Christopher R
    BPL Member

    @chrisr18

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>@alex @Paul Sleeping pad is an etherlight xt insulated.  Think that will be warm enough?</p>
    <p style=”text-align: center;”>@axel do you think I would be better off with a MH Ghost Whisperer Hoody than the Atom LT Hoody? Or both? Or a sleeping bag liner instead.</p>

    @matthew
    wipes are .3 oz each.

    #3723936
    Erik G
    BPL Member

    @fox212

    Locale: Central Coast

    I think the Ghost Whisperer would be a better option as it’ll give you similar/slightly more warmth for less weight. Neither would be very comfortable to hike in (which you won’t need to do anyway), and neither would be warm enough standalone at camp at 30F (for me anyway). But that’s where the added utility of your quilt comes in!

    Looks like OP’s pad is the Ether Light XT *Insulated* – 22 oz for a large. 3.2 R value. Should be fine, IMO, but a supplemental 1/8″ ccf pad wouldn’t hurt.

    #3723939
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    Insulated – got it. That’ll work fine.

    #3724017
    Adrian Griffin
    BPL Member

    @desolationman

    Locale: Sacramento

    Get a CuloClean. It works great. No TP or wipes to pack out or bury. Use it with one of the real flimsy squeezable water bottles from Walmart or CostCo. Smart Water bottles are too stiff to squeeze well.

    #3724018
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @commonloon

    Looks like a good list to me.

    Regarding insulated jacket: I think it depends how cold it turns out being and how much time you plan on standing around camp. If for example you are solo then if it gets cold you can always cook in your vestibule or near your tent, and not spend much time out of your bag. If you’re standing around talking to your hiking partner for a hour or so each night that is different. I’m not a fan of MH Ghost Whispers myself, as never found mine all that warm. A good midlayer late season makes for comfortable walking when it’s cold.

    Same goes for where you plan on camping: if you camp high up in Humphrey’s basin or in Darwin Canyon (depending on your route) or near Muir Pass then you’ll likely need that 22F sleeping bag and layers in Sept. Lower down likely not so much.

    My 2 cents.

    #3724027
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    Nighttime temps high vs. low….

    Er… actually, it can be significantly colder down low than up high… cold air is heavier and moves down, while warm air is lighter and move up…

    just sayin’ …..

     

     

    #3724031
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @commonloon

    As a rule (generalizing) in the Sierra up high, above the treeline, you have a lack of trees (more wind, less thermal energy to camp in) and lapse rate affects temps (approx 3F+ per 1000 ft), so temps tend to be lower.  The N Lake to S Lake loop has more than 2000 ft of elevation variation from below treeline to above.

    Obviously, when looking for a campsite, don’t camp in a local depression (where the cold air will settle).

    #3724080
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    It would be hard–impossible?–not to camp at elevation for at least some nights on this route.

    #3724083
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    Well, I can tell you from 30 years of experience living in the Sierra, that under some conditions, it is warmer up high…. best to take warm enough cloths for cold whether you are camping high or low…

     

    #3724140
    Paul S
    BPL Member

    @commonloon

    DWR D – agree. I’m a Sierra old timer as well. I’ve been in “Winter” snow storms in June.

    Jscott – yes, hard not to… You can camp along the route just before and after the passes and stay just below treeline. Piute Canyon, SJ river, Evolution Valley or lake (barely above), Le Conte Canyon and Dusy (at).

    It’s a beautiful loop in a fine part of the Sierra.

    #3724141
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    it is a beautiful loop–and most of the finest campsites, for views anyway, are at the higher elevations, IMO.

    As yet one more Sierra old timer, I also agree that it can be colder at lower elevations at night. And of course, canyon bottoms with streams are more liable to tent condensation as well.

    #3724178
    Christopher R
    BPL Member

    @chrisr18

    Any recommendations on a jacket to swap out? Light but warmer?

    #3724198
    Brad P
    BPL Member

    @brawndo

    Any recommendations on a jacket to swap out? Light but warmer?

    Montbell Plasma 1000, Montbell EX Light Down Anorak or Feathered Friends EOS. All should be available before September.

     

    #3724200
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    When it comes to down…a few ounces makes a big difference. I don’t know that it’s worth skimping on three ounces and being cold. down is the lightest AND most efficient insulator. I’d rather leave half a protein bar at home and bring a beefier jacket. Or eat the bar at the trailhead and call it good.

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