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Pyramid tents – pole strength


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Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #3753464
    David N
    BPL Member

    @deejayen

    I was browsing the Locus Gear site and noticed a line where they say they can supply a fixed carbon pole for their Khufu tent, but that it’s of inferior strength compared to a trekking pole.

     

    I’m a cyclist, so I don’t use trekking poles.  I think I’ve read of other fixed poles bending, so I’m wondering how much of a problem this might be.  Presumably all poles aren’t created equal, and there may be differences in diameter, not to mention material (aluminium vs carbon).

     

    I’m in Scotland, where it can be pretty windy at times, so I’m wondering how much of a liability a pyramid tent with a fixed pole might be!

    #3753473
    Brad Rogers
    BPL Member

    @mocs123

    Locale: Southeast Tennessee

    Trekking poles are made with fairly large diameter carbon or aluminum tubing compared to most regular tent poles so they are indeed stronger.   I would try and get a larger diameter pole for added strength if you’re planning on using it in high winds.

    #3753477
    David N
    BPL Member

    @deejayen

    Thanks, Brad.

     

    It looks like 12mm (o.47″) diameter carbon poles are readily available in the UK.  Are these still a bit weedy compared to trekking poles?

     

    On a related note, how secure or flappy is this type of shelter in a gale?  I’m thinking of the Khufu or similar, such as the MLD Solomid XL.

    #3753478
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    David, you might try reaching out to Ruta Locura. They provide poles in multiple diameters and can probably guide you towards an appropriate solution for your application.

    http://rutalocura.com/?page_id=5897/

    #3753480
    Brad Rogers
    BPL Member

    @mocs123

    Locale: Southeast Tennessee

    A single pole mid, such as the Solomid XL, Duomid, Locus Gear, etc, are pretty stout in the wind if pitched taut and with good stakes.   I’ve never used a Trailstar but it’s supposed to be better in the wind for minimal weight gain, but there are disadvantages to it too.

    #3753484
    Stumphges
    BPL Member

    @stumphges

    David, I’d check with your fellows over at trek-lite.com. I think you’ll find lots of info about poles suitable to support small pyramids in a gale.

    Light trekking poles like Locus Gear’s CP3 poles are made with 16mm, 14mm and 12mm pole sections. In my experience, a pole 12mm in diameter is too bendy to support a small mono-pole pyramid with complete confidence. This is assuming 12mm diameter with 1mm wall thickness, so this type of pole stock would be advertised as 12×10 mm (12mm outer diameter, 10mm inner diameter).

    However, MLD sell a pole for supporting their small pyramids that is 10.75 mm OD. They do not specify the inner diameter, and I suspect their pole stock is a little thicker than 1mm. (MLD uses unidirectional carbon tubing, which is a bit unusual in the industry; the only unidirectional pole stock I’ve been able to find for sale on line in small diameter like this does have wall thickness greater than 1mm).

    Another example of an available pole meant to support small pyramids is Ruta Locura; they recommend 15mm pole for pyramids this size. I think they are probably using 1mm wall thickness, but I’m not sure.

    I have a 14mm (14mmx12mm) pole for a 135cm-tall pyramid and think this is adequate. 16x14mm would be stronger still and weigh about 1 ounce more for a pole around 140cm long. However, I have read about guys in the UK who sometimes pitch their 135cm-tall Luxe Hexpeaks with two trekking poles side by side.

    The Colorado-based company, Seek Outside, is known for prioritizing strength over weight. The pole they sell to support their 145 cm-tall Silvertip hexagonal tipi has an OD of 23mm! I think that might be overkill, or in any case recommend the largest diameter you might ever need to consider.

    Here is a post that explains the relationship between diameter, pole rigidity and pole strength: https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/myog-cf-tent-poles/#post-3730154

     

    #3753521
    Chris R
    BPL Member

    @bothwell-voyageur

    You could always just buy a trekking pole (maybe someone has a single pole they’d like to sell) and take the handle off. The foldable poles pack down quite short.

    Poles to handle snow load do need to be much stiffer/stronger. The snow can build up on one side of the tent creating a very heavy load on one side of the tent.

    #3753524
    David N
    BPL Member

    @deejayen

    Thanks very much for all the great info!

     

    I’m just at the pondering stage of buying a new tent, so I’m not sure if I’ll end up with a mid-style tent.  I suppose I’d really need to try one for myself to weigh up the pros and cons against alternative style tents.  However, it’s good to know there are options for a sturdy pole.

    #3753537
    Ron Bell
    BPL Member

    @mountainlaureldesigns

    Locale: USA

    Update!  All MLD tent and pyramid poles are 13 mm.  The shorter tarp specific poles are 11 mm.

    #3753615
    Sam Farrington
    BPL Member

    @scfhome

    Locale: Chocorua NH, USA

    I’ve been through a bunch of trekking poles, and a number of them were quite ‘bendy’ and unsuitable for hiking over steep or rough terrain.  You may have to try the pole in person to see if it is adequately rigid.  Am hiking now with a cheap Yukon Charlie cuben/ALU pole that is very stiff, much more than some of the other more expensive ones.  You can recognize the Charlie because the top section is carbon, and the lower two sections are alloy on the outside.

    Note:  In addition to diameter, the rigidity and strength also depend on the wall thickness and the layup of the carbon and temper of the alloy.  If you can find a good ski outlet, ski touring poles can be a cheap source of long poles, even telescoping ones, and are built strong, rigid and light.

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