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Podcast 014 | SKILLS SHORT – Training for Backpacking


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Podcast 014 | SKILLS SHORT – Training for Backpacking

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  • #3604009
    Backpacking Light
    Admin

    @backpackinglight

    Locale: Rocky Mountains

    Companion forum thread to: Podcast 014 | SKILLS SHORT – Training for Backpacking

    It’s no secret: the more physically prepared you are for a backpacking trip, the more you are going to enjoy yourself. But what are the most effective ways to reach optimal backpacking condition? That’s the topic of today’s BPL SKILLS SHORT: training.

    #3604082
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Thanks, Guys!

    #3604408
    Bryan Bihlmaier
    BPL Member

    @bryanb

    Locale: Wasatch Mountains

    Thanks for putting together this podcast.  Obviously this is a very broad, and somewhat controversial, topic.

    I was most intrigued about training the skin of your feet to not absorb moisture, and help prevent blisters.  What ointments, waxes, or other products do you most recommend for this?  And it sounds like it needs to be applied daily, whether hiking or not, correct?

    #3604724
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    Bryan – I usually apply it daily most of the year, because I’m at least running and day hiking (training) most of the year. Usually in the mornings on training days, and daily for 2-3 weeks prior to major trips.

    I use this.

    #3604757
    Bryan Bihlmaier
    BPL Member

    @bryanb

    Locale: Wasatch Mountains

    Thanks. I use that same stuff for chafing when running and biking. It’s easy to apply compared to creams! I’m glad it works for your feet too. I’ll give it a try.

    #3605665
    rubmybelly!
    BPL Member

    @sleeping

    Locale: The Cascades

    You can lift lots of weights
    You can go without cake
    You can do lots of squats without talking.
    But you do know my friend
    That really, in the end
    Backpacking ain’t nothing but walking.

    Instead exercise your mind
    And you know, you might find
    That your backcountry walks have new meaning.
    Slow down, contemplate
    All around you is great!
    At least that’s the way I’m going to be leaning.

    #3605736
    W I S N E R !
    BPL Member

    @xnomanx

    ^^^

    Hear hear!

    #3605986
    Tom K
    BPL Member

    @tom-kirchneraol-com-2

    “That really, in the end
    Backpacking ain’t nothing but walking.

    Instead exercise your mind
    And you know, you might find
    That your backcountry walks have new meaning.”

    Words of wisdom delivered in vintage, irreverent Idester style.

     

    #3606157
    Scott Nelson
    BPL Member

    @nlsscott

    Locale: Southern California and Sierras

    Not at poetic, but I have found “Ready to Run” by Dr. Kelly Starrett to be really helpful for stretches and strengthening exercises to avoid injury.

    Scott

    #3627390
    Steve E
    Spectator

    @steve8

    I’m really enjoying this podcast, which I discovered only recently, and just joined as a member. I’ve been pretty committed to lightweight backpacking for about 5 seasons now, been on trails my whole life, and I’ve learned more in listening to the few casts so far than I have in hours of listening to and reading other stuff. Very tight. Thanks!

    Regarding fitness for the trail, I always like to remind my fellow trail companions of the value of yoga for maintaining strength and flexibility over time. I’m no yoga freak — I’m a 58-year-old guy with seriously limited flexibility. Skinny and 6’3′. Can’t touch my toes and never will be able to. After years of mountain biking and trail running, I started a regular practice of yoga about 5 years ago (about the same time I started walking more miles with a backpack on). I wish I had been doing yoga all my life. My performance, comfort, and well being would have been in a whole different place. As I age, I find it has improved my walking comfort and endurance; my comfort in camp — just moving around, getting in and out of my tent, for example; and my recovery. In the mornings, I feel less stiff and sore for a shorter period of time. Yoga also helps my balance, which diminishes with age (evidently) — a huge safety benefit.

    So that’s my encouragement based on my experience. I attend periodic yoga classes, but mostly I use YogaGlo, an excellent video website. Even a 15-30 minute session of quality yoga goes a long way, and they have 100s of classes and programs that are dialed in for your needs. For example, I just searched for “hiking” and got “Post Hiking Stretch,” “Release leg, hip and back soreness,” “Cross training flow for athletes,” and, even, “Hiking Meditation.”

    Again, not promoting anything specific, just sharing a “best practice” that has been transformational for this old(er) guy who wants to stay on the trail for as long as he can!

    Namaste

    #3627668
    Tom K
    BPL Member

    @tom-kirchneraol-com-2

    Solvitur ambulando.

    #3718539
    Josh J
    BPL Member

    @uahiker

    i would agree trail running is better than street but for those who live in flat land it’s better than nothing. you can still gain a great cardio base by street running as long as you stay below your aerobic threshold. you can also do muscular endurance work outs to condition your muscles as well. if you have great muscular endurance and cardio base (ie aerobic threshold is with in 10% of your anaerobic threshold you should be good) there was a 75yr who lives in Chicago who just summitted Everest….. all training being done in chicago…. it’s possible

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