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Moment DW end stakes


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  • #3717752
    Paul McLaughlin
    BPL Member

    @paul-1

    For those who have a Tarptent Moment DW: how do you like the Easton stakes that are supplied for the end guys? I would especially like to hear from any users whose experience is in the Sierra, as to penetration on the typical Sierra soils, holding power, can you pound on these things with a rock, etc. And if you have replaced with different stakes, please tell me why and what. Thanks!

    #3717794
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I find MSR Groundhogs to be much stronger than Easton Spikes. They are much harder to bend and their one piece construction makes more sense to me when extracting the stake from rocky soil. I find their holding power to be excellent and if I’m feeling uncertain about the soil at a specific spot I can pile some rocks on top of the stake.

    There are so many rocks in the Sierra I would never take Eastons. I’m sure some people do but not me.

     

    #3717862
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    If you are camping high at or above tree line just forget the stakes… save the weight and use rocks. Those Easton’s and all aluminum stakes will be toast… Can’t count how many aluminum stakes have broken over the years before I finally gave up and used rocks.

    DWR…

    #3719065
    Paul McLaughlin
    BPL Member

    @paul-1

    I have tried rocks, I don’t do it unless I have to. Trying to find rocks that are heavy enough to do the trick but can be moved without leaving a scar, trying to tie a rope around the rock, all that is too much hassle for me, I’d rather carry a few ounces worth of stakes.

    Matthew – do you have a Moment? I’m hoping to hear from Some Moment owners on their specific experiences, given that the Moment relies heavily on those two end stakes.

    #3719077
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    Paul…

    If you are camping at tree line or above in the Sierra there is very little, if any soil. You will be lucky to get one stake to penetrate the rocky ground… even a steel stake!!! I have been backpacking the High Sierra for over 40 years… and I live in the Sierra. All my backpacking friends do NOT bring stakes for High Sierra trips. However, if you are going to camp low in the valleys that is another story… soil down there…

    DWR

    #3719080
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    Paul,

    I don’t own the Moment, but I do own two Tarptents… the Notch also relies heavily on the two end point anchors. I use stakes in the PNW and rocks in the Sierra. Yes, the Tarptents are designed for stakes… but it’s ridiculous to view their set up videos if you are imagining a High Sierra set up… just pushing those hollow aluminum stakes in the ground (lawn in the videos) with your hand like in the videos is another world. Not going to happen when camping up high in the Sierra… and trying to pound those Easton stakes in granite with a rock will destroy them. Basically, I add some rock loops through the spots where Tarpetent uses a stake… As for ‘disturbing rocks’… virtually all previously used High Sierra camps will have rocks at the ready that other campers have used for their tents… because they could not get their stakes into the ground/rock…. But I suppose in some cases taking stakes you could slide them through horizontal the Traptent loop where they are supposed to go and then pile rocks on top to hole them down…. but seems unnecessary to me. I am currently packing up to leave for such a backpack and taking zero stakes. But if I were taking stakes it would steel or titanium; not aluminum stakes. Anyway… that’s my view… I’m sure it will work out for you… have a great trip…

    DWR…

    #3719081
    Brad W
    BPL Member

    @rocko99

    It’s not about weight, it’s about what works for the terrain. As DWR said, use rocks when the soil can’t be penetrated-much of the Sierra.  Attempting to pound and break stakes-you will-won’t solve the problem. Little rock/stick big rock(s) works great for tents requiring heavy tension.

    If you plan to bypass advice and try stakes, the large MSR Groundhog will hold up better than the Easton to direct pounding.

    #3719178
    Paul McLaughlin
    BPL Member

    @paul-1

    Well, I too, have been backpacking in the High Sierra for about 40 years, and I’ve had pretty good luck with stakes unless I decide to camp on slabs, which I sometimes do. Have always used pretty skinny stakes, either the 7075 shepherds crooks, which are poundable unlike the 6061 versions, or more recently titanium . Have never broken a stake, nor bent one seriously. Just trying to find out what kind of stakes folks have had good luck with on the ends of their Moments.

    #3719230
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    I had a few heads pop off of those Easton stakes, so I shy away from them now. This was at least 5 years ago though, so maybe that problem has been fixed. Anyways, since then I’ve turned to MSR Groundhogs. My stake bag includes a mix of the full size and minis.

    I used the original TT Moment (single wall) and then its predecessor, Moment DW (double wall), exclusively in the Sierra for 3-4 years. I started with the supplied Easton stakes and eventually moved to the MSRs for the reason above.

    My experience in the Sierra, high or low, has been that more likely than not you can find a spot that allows stakes to be driven into the ground. Yes, even at 12K with granite everywhere, you will find sandy/decomposed granite areas that will hold a stake. If not, a stake is still useful because you can “deadman” it behind/under a football sized rock. Much easier, and requires far less cord, than tying a guyline around a rock.

    I appreciate the LNT concerns with moving rocks, but if you’re in an area that lacks soil yet has rocks (high Sierra), then you’re likely not disrupting any micro ecosystems nor aesthetics especially if you return them after use.

     

    #3719273
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    Paul, My experience mirrors Alex’s as well as your own. I’m usually able to get stakes in the ground in the Sierra. when I cannot get a stake in the ground, I’m comfortable using rocks. I typically pile a few on rather than looking for one really big rock. I squally use a smaller rock at a chock rather than using a stale as a deadman.

    I do not have a Moment. I had a Notch for a while but it never went to the Sierra. I did use it quite a bit here in AZ, which has similarly frustrating conditions.

    Using only two stakes above treeline sounds really sketchy to me unless you are bringing 18” rebar spikes and a sledgehammer. I seem to recall the Moment has extra guyout points. How about bringing a variety of stakes and seeing what works for you? Or, just bring some big Groundhogs. :)

    #3719445
    Paul McLaughlin
    BPL Member

    @paul-1

    Thanks guys, sounds like the Eastons, as I had heard, are still suspect as to the ends popping off if pounded. I may need to get a couple Groundhogs for the ends. Also may try some experimental pounding on the Eastons in my yard. For everywhere else I was always planning on the titanium skewers.

    Alex – you say you used the Moment, in both iterations – does using the past tense mean you have moved on to a different shelter?

    #3719579
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    Paul – Yes, I’ve since moved on from my beloved Moment DW to a Locus Gear Khufu Sil. No good reason why I switched. I was curious about a ‘mid so I gave it a go. Both shelters work well for me in the Sierra.

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