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Lightest long sleeve shirt/sun hoody?


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Viewing 24 posts - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #3768235
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    I saw @Stephen Seeber ‘s recommendation for a Brynje fishnet and Finetrack Elemental shirt.

    Most of the time, I have been fine just wearing my fishnet baselayer.
    However, for upcoming spring skitouring trips, I need a different solution. Warm days in full sun in the snow (whether a glacier or not) require both full coverage sleeves against sunburn, but also something thin, not warm, and NOT a dark color ;-) , haha.

    Also, for use inside mountain huts  in the Alps, it can be too warm for my PT Alpha Direct, but the fishnet is neither warm enough, nor socially acceptable (at least with my pasty white skin, chest hair and dad-bod, haha).

    So, I want something to either layer over the top of the fishnet, or wear on its own in those situations. But, since this is infrequent, I really want to minimize weight.

    My OR Astroman Hoodie (I think that’s it). Is 6.6 oz in L-tall. So, what is the lightest long sleeve, preferably hooded, shirt? If it’s no significantly lighter lighter, it’s not really worth swapping.

    #3768238
    David D
    BPL Member

    @ddf

    Don’t think you’ll find much lighter in a L-tall hoodie.  When I looked, lightest in L was Outdoor Vitals Altitude Sun hoodie, 4oz (L) but no SPF rating (watched a youtube vid where OV hummed and hawed about this), then Outdoor Vitals Tern Merino 5.4oz (L) but only SPF 36 then OR Echo hoodie 6 oz in large (in Skurka’s core list).

    None have 1/4 zip, which I think is essential.

    #3768239
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Thanks for pointing that out!

    I just ordered a Echo. It was listed as 4 oz. I forgot they usually only list M size weight.

    Astroman is claimed at 5.6 oz, so 1.6 oz savings in M. That’s not much, considering the Astroman has a zipper pocket.

    Will see if I can cancel my order.

    #3768240
    David D
    BPL Member

    @ddf

    The 4 oz Echo is in medium, see here 115g = 4.06 oz.   Echo large is 6 oz, I checked into it for myself but lack of 1/4 zip was a deal breaker for me

    #3768247
    Michael K
    BPL Member

    @chinookhead

    I think that the kiui 120 weight wool hoodie at 5.7 oz would be perfect for you.

     

    https://www.kuiu.com/products/ultra-merino-120-lt-ls-hoodie-stone

    Also, the non-hoodie version at 5.5 oz looks good in addition to the polyester Gila at a similar weight.

    However, these ultra merino tops are my favorite for all day comfort in variable conditions and not getting too stinky.

    #3768299
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Hi Michael,

    I forgot to mention, I have Mons Royale hoodies (also a lightweight merino with some nylon).

    But, I’ve switched to wearing fishnet as a baselayer, for its performance for active use.

    So, I was wondering if I could find a very lightweight synthetic hoody to bring in addition to the fishnet crew long sleeve.

    But, when I saw there really aren’t any crazy light hoodies, I was thinking I would just go back to the Merino hoody, since it would be the lightest and simplest option.

    #3768301
    BC Bob
    Spectator

    @bcbob

    Locale: Vancouver Island

    The OR Echo is a nice hoodie.  Mine weighs 121g in a large.  Just don’t bushwhack in it.  Mine was damaged on my first trek.  The material and stitching catch on branches, etc.  But I still like it.

     

    #3768307
    YoPrawn
    Spectator

    @johan-river

    Locale: Cascadia

    You need decent UPF ratings even in winter on snow, if it sunny. It’s prime time for UV burns with the light doubling up coming off the snow and ice.

    So, you REALLY do not want to be going as light as possible, in my opinion. Polyester is what gives the shirts their UV resistance, not magic. That means the UV protection is directly related to the weight of the fabric, for the most part.

    For winter, in the sun, I use the OR Echo hoodie and layer on top or bottom of other layers. You say not wanting dark colors, but the darker color Echo shirts are UPF 20 and the lighter ones UPF 15.

    Darker shirts are also better for snow sun, in my opinion, because they don’t reflect as much light into your face and eyes. Dark isn’t too hot in winter. :)

    #3768315
    Link .
    BPL Member

    @annapurna

    The KETL MOUNTAIN NOFRY SUN HOODIE is not a quarter zip but uses snaps that open about a 1/4 down the front, weighs 4.2 ounces for a medium and say 30+UPF rating and $10 cheaper than the Echo, I have heard some good things about it , but not used it yet myself.

    #3768322
    Brad W
    BPL Member

    @rocko99

    Ketl looks interesting, appears to be the same fabric as the Echo. Almost all colors of Echo are 20upf, wonder if Ketl is ‘adjusting’ their rating.

    #3768330
    john mcalpine
    BPL Member

    @cowpie

    Thanks Link….   I just ordered one of those Ketl Sunhirts for $49 delivered.   $10 off for signing up for emails.

    To be honest I’m not a fan of hoodies.  I own a couple OR hoodies and find them hot and uncomfortable here in a PNW summer.   I’d rather have my Columbia polyester button down longsleeve shirt.

    It looks like the Ketl hoodie has some button to vent better, so I’ll give this hoodie a try

    #3768334
    Eric Blanche
    BPL Member

    @eblanche

    Locale: Northeast US

    I’ve worn the OR Echo for many years now and don’t really think its a great option for lightweight sun shirt. Sure its UPF 15 or 20, but is that really enough? I don’t know any better just curious…

    I’ve had very noticeable tan lines from my sternum strap from wearing only an OR Echo in the NM desert.

     

     

    #3768350
    Michael K
    BPL Member

    @chinookhead

    I agree that the OR Echo is not a great sunshirt, especially at high altitude for prolonged periods of time.  I have “tanned” under an OR Echo in the above conditions so I know that it is not blocking things too well and especially after some washes and abrasion from use I imagine it got worse.  This is why I stopped using it when I need something specifically for sun exposure at high altitudes for long periods of time. The KUIU 50spf shirts have been great for me for this purpose.

    Also, after multiple days polyester gets very stinky and uncomfortable for me (heat rashes etc.) whereas I never have issues with the wool.

    #3768411
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Agree, for true, serious sun protection UPF 20 or so is not enough.

    Here is a good article about sun hoodies, which includes an explanation of the lack of oversight/enforcement on UPF claims in the US.

    Including about (lack of) testing each color, due to variations in protection.

    https://femignarly.com/2020/05/28/sun-hoody-101/

     

    https://femignarly.com/2021/07/16/patagonias-sun-protective-upf-recall/

    #3768412
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    I too am not a fan of synthetic for multiple days use, which is why I had moved to the 140g/m2 Mons Royale 83% merino for my baselayers.

    But I have been back to fishnet baselayers (Brynje wool and Castelli Miracolo, also wool) recently,  and love them for cold weather use, so I was considering  adding a super light synthetic layer to add over the top of that.

    So far it seems it is no use to buy any other one for that. My Astroman is almost as light, and has a touch of wind protection, great in the alpine.

    Still, combined pack size and weight is still much more than just using my MR merino hoody, so I probably will do that.

    Might still also get the Kuiu to replace my Mons Royale, because all the Mons Royale Temple Techs have either black sleeves or black body.

    I am very suspicious of Kuiu’s claim of UPF 50 for a 120g/m2 fabric. That is very thin. My  Mons Royale is slightly see through, which I think sounds like ‘no real sun protection’ to me.

    WoolX claims UPF 25 for their 160g/m2 fabrics.

    #3768416
    Michael K
    BPL Member

    @chinookhead

    The reason why i think the kuiu  has performed so much better than othet merinos I’ve tried is its use of nuyarn and its combination with nylon instead of polyester as most of the blends used that ive tried. It seems to make it a bit more durable and definitely helps retain the merino anti-stink.  My Voormi River Run Hoodie is great but with its 100 gm 48% ployester 52% wool blend it gets stinkier much more quickly than my pure merino or nuyarn pieces .

    However, keep in mind that ive used the 150 gram shirt fir 7 years and still going strong, Artilect Nuyarn bottoms in 120 and 200 gm for 3 years, and the 120 gm KUIU hoodie only for 4 months.  So far so good with the 120 hoidie, but obviously i dont know if it will perform as good as the KUIU 15o gm tops or Artlects 120 and 200 bottoms yet. My assumption is that it should perform like the Artilect 120 bottoms, but the bottoms are always under something.

    #3768417
    Michael K
    BPL Member

    @chinookhead

    #3768712
    Justin W
    Spectator

    @light2lighter

    Have you looked at the Ekoi Thermo Evo Hood baselayer?  In the s/m it weighs 95 grams/3.4 oz.

    It’s kind of a unique piece.  First, it is made out of nylon, but hollow nylon fibers.  Because it is nylon vs polyester, it is less inherently odor facilitating and easier to wash out because of that. Nylon is a tough fabric.  And because the fibers are hollow, it is a bit warmer per similar thickness of a garment made out of solid fibers of similar size. How much warmer is hard to say. Polartec use to advertise their hollow polyester fleece (i.e. AirCore) has having 20% greater thermal insulation value as compared to their regular fleece (per same thickness I would imagine).  20% seems reasonable.

    (Some extreme cold weather adapted animals grow hollow fibers to help with insulation: polar bears, alpaca, yak, caribou, etc).

    I just bought one a little while back and haven’t tested it yet. All the above is based on what I know about materials otherwise, both scientifically and on previous experience with various materials. Unfortunately, it looks like only their XXL is what is available. I got that size because I don’t like the compression style fitting that these have (that and that’s all they had then as well).  I can weigh it later and get back to you.

    (I also use fishnet as baselayer usually, that or high void grid fleece).

    #3768713
    Justin W
    Spectator

    @light2lighter

    I missed that you were looking for lighter colors–don’t think the above comes in any different colors than black.  You’re not wearing a windjacket over any of this?

    #3768723
    Chris K
    BPL Member

    @cmkannen-2-2

    Tjaard – you might want to check out the Patagonia Airshed Pro. I wear a super thin merino t under it in winter and it’s a great combo. The Airshed Pro is not UPF rated, but uses the “Airshed” fabric for basically the short sleeve t-shirt portion of the garment, with capilene cool fabric for the lower sleeves and hood.

    Deep two-way zipper is nice as well.

    Also pretty light.

    #3768774
    YoPrawn
    Spectator

    @johan-river

    Locale: Cascadia

    I’ve worn the OR Echo for many years now and don’t really think its a great option for lightweight sun shirt. Sure its UPF 15 or 20, but is that really enough? I don’t know any better just curious…

    I’ve had very noticeable tan lines from my sternum strap from wearing only an OR Echo in the NM desert.

    It probably isn’t ideal, at all for UV protection. But, the way I look at it, is that I would get heat stroke in anything thicker, so that is my main concern. Gaining enough sun resistance while not cooking in the heat at priority #1.

    Also, those high deserts are brutal for UV. SPF 50 mineral sunscreen, often, is probably the ticket, even if just under an Echo shirt.

    I’m at sea level, so the UPF 15-20 is pretty effective. I would never rely on it in NM or AZ deserts.

    #3806592
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Chris K, yes airshed could be a good option. Like the Astroman, it has a bit of wind resistance, which is a plus for colder conditions, but a minus for warmer ones.
    New version has a claimed weight of 3.7 oz, so that would probably add up to about 2.5 oz weight savings in my size, if it’s correct.

    I did end up buying the Echo and Outdoor Vitals hoodies in the intervening years.


    @Justin
    W , no not wearing a shell over this (most of the time). This is for cool/cold conditions, where I’d be wearing a Brynje Fishnet baselayer, but it might warm up enough that a (wind) shell over the fishnet is too warm. In that case, normally, you’d just hike in your baselayer, but if your baselayer is fishnet,that’s  not enough protection from wind and sun, so  something to add some sun protection, and maybe add just a little bit of wind resistance is required.

    If it got truly windy, wet or cold, I’d put my shell back on.

     

     

    #3806614
    Haakon R
    BPL Member

    @aico

    I’ve come to similar conclusions regarding spring and summer skiing. For both sun protection and to feel more socially comfortable I’m switching out my brynje’s for thin wool shirts/hoodies when the weather warms up and I’m likely to spend more time in just my base layer.

    I just got the OV Tern hoodie and really like how thin and light it is. Not sure how it will hold up to abuse though.

    Where I usually ski (high latitude, low altitude) I’m not too worried about the UPF rating. Wool is among the better materials to absorb UV, but rarely rated because of the variability of natural fibers. So I just pick a hoodie with suitable thickness and coverage. The weather rarely permits whole days wearing just a hoodie so a wind shirt goes on top for parts of the day, so this adds to the total sun protection as well. I’ve never been burned though my clothes, so I worry more about the exposed parts of my body.

    #3806615
    Tjaard Breeuwer
    BPL Member

    @tjaard

    Locale: Minnesota, USA

    Yeah, I have about the same thoughts Haakon, including on the Tern hoody.

    i am going to experiment in moderate temps (like skiing) with short sleeve or sleeveless Brynje underneath a thin sun hoody, to see if that helps maintain (most of the) the excellent moisture management of the fish net, while providing full coverage for sun and without getting too hot.

    Only difference is that I do ski at lower latitudes and higher altitudes than you. But, only a few days per year, and like you said, much of the time you are still wearing another layer, so I too worry more about hands, neck and face than torso and arms for  UV exposure.

     

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