Topic

How to Make Coffee in the Backcountry: Gear and Methods


Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable How to Make Coffee in the Backcountry: Gear and Methods

Viewing 10 posts - 51 through 60 (of 60 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #3618954
    Emylene VanderVelden
    BPL Member

    @emylene-vandervelden

    Bahaha! I will drink stale coffee, but I draw the line at moldy coffee. My dad is Dutch and their method for strong coffee is to leave it in the pot on the wood stove to heat for about 24 or more. It’s a bit like syrup and tastes like…. burning tar. I also draw the line there.

    #3619069
    David P
    BPL Member

    @david-paradis

    Emylene, That Dutch method sounds pretty potent. As my mom would say “it’ll put hair on your chest” x^D

    It’s kind of like a “reduction” like you would make with medicinal herbs. Since I’m part Dutch (thx mom) I may have to try that actually… I wonder if reduced enough you could bottle the syrup, bring into the field and just add hot water to reconstitute? Mebbe taste yucky though…

    Newest Starbucks flavor (coming soon)

    “Burning Tar Dutch Latte”
    (spoken unintelligibly fast) Common side effects include stunted growth, heart palpitations, uncontrollable shaking, excessive sweating from palms, and lifelong insomnia. Do not consume if pregnant or nursing. Keep out of reach of small children and pets.

    #3619075
    William Chilton
    BPL Member

    @williamc3

    Locale: Antakya

    It sounds rather like mırra.

    #3619094
    Tom K
    BPL Member

    @tom-kirchneraol-com-2

    “They are ground so that they are still grainy, unlike Turkish coffee, which is more like a powder.”

    The times I was served mirra in Lebanon, they pounded the beans in a large brass mortar with a brass pestle just before brewing to ensure freshness.  But that was over 50 years ago;  now they probably buy it preground in bags(cynic in me speaking here).  Either way, half a demitasse is enough to make sure you don’t fall asleep behind the wheel on the way home.

    “Common side effects include stunted growth, heart palpitations, uncontrollable shaking, excessive sweating from palms, and lifelong insomnia.”

    But at least you’ll die with a full head of hair.

    #3623826
    Greg Mihalik
    BPL Member

    @greg23

    Locale: Colorado

    Another nod of the head to Café Bustelo instant –

    $12 for 72 packets is $.17 per packet and it takes 2 packets for a 12 ounce cup.  The pre-portioned packets provide a consistent strength, are much cheaper than Starbucks Via,  and in my opinion produce a better cup of coffee.  Not as good as home brew, but excellent on the trail, or on the road.

     

    #3623829
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Does anyone perk coffee anymore?

    #3623831
    Mina Loomis
    BPL Member

    @elmvine

    Locale: Central Texas

    We sell enough of the enamelware perk pots at the REI I work at.  But those aren’t backpacking-weight gear.  I do often have to explain to our younger shoppers how a perk pot works–they aren’t familiar with them.  I haven’t seen one small and light enough for backpacking.  Plus you would have to let it simmer long enough to finish percolating, so maybe more fuel than just boil water, soak, and strain.

    #3623833
    MJ H
    BPL Member

    @mjh

    I remember perked coffee. It wasn’t very good.

    #3623853
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Filter (or plunger – same thing).
    But I find the coffee beans themselves play a very large part in how it tastes, perhaps more so than how it is brewed.

    Cheers

    #3623919
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    Well, I had an old circa 1950 aluminum perk pot I used for camping for many years. It cooked everything from coffee to macaroni and points in between. The built in strainer was great for cooked veggies. It didn’t fry so well, though. It weighed in around 10oz all told and held about 8 cups. Back in those days, canister stoves weren’t. WG stoves were painfully heavy. A small cake-cooling rack, cum grill (around 4oz), over a wood fire worked well. Anyway, it made excellent coffee. But breakfast was a two hour affair.

Viewing 10 posts - 51 through 60 (of 60 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Loading...