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Ever had a coyote bark at you in camp (for over a minute)?


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Home Forums Campfire The Natural World Ever had a coyote bark at you in camp (for over a minute)?

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
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  • #3790937
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Southern Indiana

    I’ve camped out in coyote country hundreds of nights so I’m used to their howling and yiping right after nightfall, but I’ve never had one approach my camp after dark and bark at me (about 90 seconds). Last week I was stealth camping at a park in Southern Indiana. I was just laying under a tarp when I heard what at first sounded like a small dog begin to bark. No other people were around so I knew I was the object of the canine’s attention. I’d guess it was probably 25 yards away. I thought oh hell because the number one thing that will expose your presence and give you away is a dog. Anyway, the first 10 seconds sounded like a dog’s bark but then it went into that high pitched shrill of a coyote for the next 80 seconds or so. Then I thought to myself: why you bold little SOB, if I could see you I’d throw something at you. He/she was alerting the pack to my being there (I suppose).

    When I lived in Scottsdale coyotes were fearless and would grab your little Jack Russel Terrier right in your backyard in broad daylight. They used the network of drainages ditches as superhighways. Yet as soon as you got out of city limits and into open desert they’d run from you because they’re hunted pretty heavily.

    Anybody else ever had a coyote bark at them when they’re bedded down for camp.

    I’ve met a few Arizona natives who like to tell backpackers scary stories about aggressive coyotes, bear and mountain lion. They get their kicks, kind of like ghost stories or tales about Bigfoot, the boogie man, etc. Yet I’ve always been amazed at how many non-backpackers really do believe coyotes will potentially attack humans.

    #3790938
    AK Granola
    BPL Member

    @granolagirlak

    Coyotes do sometimes attack humans. Plenty of evidence for that. But not common. I have been followed by one in Arizona but only for a short distance. Wildlife attacks are one of those be aware things, but don’t be paranoid. What finally deterred the coyote from barking at you? They’re all over my neighborhood, but I rarely even see them. We hear them frequently.

    #3790940
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    I’ve camped before and coyotes were yowling maybe 100 yards away.   I’m not sure if they knew I was there.  I was nervous but they didn’t do anything else.

    We need more wolves around, they’d scare off the coyotes :)

    #3790946
    Luke Schmidt
    BPL Member

    @cameron

    Locale: Alaska

    We camped close to a wolf den (we think) in British Columbia. We saw pups by the river than mom started howling. Later the whole pack opened up. Pretty cool.

    YouTube video

    #3790950
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    Maybe hungry. Coyotes will stand in the road, stopping cars for handouts. They associate people with food.

    #3790954
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    that would have been really cool to see Luke

    as long as they weren’t hungry : )

    I think the Coyotes stopping cars for food are the ones we should worry about hurting humans

    #3790957
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    I had one stop me in JT. Healthy looking.  I didn’t feed it. I guess you could get bit. A coyote won’t hurt you. They’ll lead your dog off.  I worry more about hitting one. Just like the crows, they will follow you. They associate humans with trash to eat.

    #3790958
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    I was awakened one morning at maybe 4:30AM by a pack of coyotes apparently chasing down something for breakfast.  The whole pack barked and yipped and moved in a full 360 around our camp, coming within maybe 20 yards (?) at one point.  They eventually stopped moving, apparently having caught (or given up on?) whatever they were after, then quieted down and moved away.  I wish I could have gotten out of my bag/tent in time to see it, but it may have been too dark anyway–just barely into twilight at best.  I could find no carcass, fur, blood, or digging when it was light enough to look.

    #3790960
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    A relative said they were walking their dog off leash.  Some coyotes came along and appeared to want to play and lead it off, presumably to eat it.

    #3790964
    Monte Masterson
    BPL Member

    @septimius

    Locale: Southern Indiana

    And some of the places I go there are huge numbers of deer and they’re not very scared of people either. I find that at the interface of outer suburbs to rural lands animals quickly realize their risk level is generally much lower. There’s far less hunting (usually) than in the sparsely populated backcountry. Also most county and state parks rarely allow hunting.

    I often encounter deer that snort like crazy when they notice a human bedded down in their area. Man is it loud and it can go on for an hour or more. The deer also stomp the ground and I’ve become convinced it’s an intimidation tactic. Same with the coyote that approached my campsite and started barking at me, I believe he/she might have been trying to scare me off….seriously. Call me kooky but I really do think animals are that smart.

    #3790965
    Glen L
    Spectator

    @wyatt-carson

    Locale: Southern Arizona

    Wildlife are all around us here, packs of coyotes and some almost tame deer. Lion kill sites are all over and I’ve marked a bunch. The ones we are very careful about are the javelina. They have blundered into us and we have blundered into them. They will aggressively chase humans when they feel threatened. Most of the time they just move on.

     

    The only thing that we have had come into our camp purposely while we were there was a kit fox in Anza Borrego. It stole several food packages that were empty. We didn’t even know it was creeping around until it rattled a titanium pot. Its eyes reflected back to us when headlamps caught it. We found the packages under a bush nearby the next morning.

    #3790966
    AK Granola
    BPL Member

    @granolagirlak

    Deer can be annoying. Especially the biggest ones; they make me late to work.

    #3791025
    Ben H.
    BPL Member

    @bzhayes

    Locale: No. Alabama

    I remember going to see/hear the LA Philharmonic at the Hollywood bowl (in the canyons above Hollywood) and have the coyotes howl along with the orchestra. The Hollywood Bowl also lets you bring in food and wine. It was a wonderful evening with a great combination of wildlife and luxury, versus the night the skunk walked down the aisle….

     

    #3791031
    Matthew / BPL
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    Not the same thing as you mentioned, Monte but here’s my coyote barking story… Car camping on the Mogollon Rim a few years ago I was making coffee at first light and my 40# cattledog seemed to be aware of something out in the trees. I heard a bark and saw a coyote maybe 50 or 75 yards out looking at us. The bark was returned by several responses in a circle around our camp. I quickly put our dog in the car where she stared with the widest eyes I’ve ever seen. The coyotes trotted off and were not seen again.

    #3791040
    Terran Terran
    BPL Member

    @terran

    I found a den on the side yard of a house I was looking to rent. I showed it to another couple that had also shown up. Anyways, I got the house. We were in an animal corridor. The neighbors raised pigs. Occasionally they’d lose one to the mountain lions. Honestly, I think I’ve seen more in town then anywhere else. Gardens attract prey.

    I was leaving a friends house and scared up a kangaroo rat. A hawk came down and nabbed it. I thought , what are the odds?. Next time I went to visit, I saw the hawk. It was waiting for me to leave and scare up some food.

    #3791078
    Dan
    BPL Member

    @dan-s

    Locale: Colorado

    Even though you know they won’t attack, it’s pretty creepy in the wilderness at night when they are making noise near you.

    I have had coyotes taunt me in various ways on many occasions, in the wilderness and in our local open space (although the local population has really decreased over the last decade). Sometimes they bark/yip, sometimes they just trot along parallel to me. I’m usually with my dog(s), so I generally assume that’s part of it, but I don’t know.

    One of my dogs was a real hunter, and she always used to chase them in town, but I don’t think she ever caught one. In the wilderness, I didn’t let her chase.

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