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Does a trekking pole tent make sense for me if I don’t use trekking poles?


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Home Forums General Forums General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion Does a trekking pole tent make sense for me if I don’t use trekking poles?

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #3753529
    Joey G
    BPL Member

    @joey-green

    There are many tents I’m interested in still. At the top of that list is Xmid  2p ( I have one on pre-order ) and TT Stratospire 2. Mostly since they meet my requirements of weather resistance, durable, silpoly, and light enough for me. I plan on getting carbon fiber poles to use.

    Anybody else in this situation? Does it make sense? Should I just get a free standing tent?

    #3753534
    Brad Rogers
    BPL Member

    @mocs123

    Locale: Southeast Tennessee

    I’m not sure if I’d go free standing per say, but a trekking pole shelter doesn’t make as much sense for someone that doesn’t use trekking poles.   What about something like the Tarptent Moment?

    #3753535
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    You could get a trekking-pole tent and start using trekking poles. :-)

    #3753562
    Jason
    BPL Member

    @hermantherugger

    Weight savings and multiple use items aside, the thing I like most about trekking pole tents is pitching the fly first.  Pitching a traditional tent inner in the rain is a miserable experience.

    I’d take a close look at something like the Tarptent Double Rainbow before going with something that requires additional poles.  I picked up a well used older version that needed a few small repairs (zippers, sealing, etc) for my kids to use on backcountry hikes.  The setup is something they can easily manage, and livable space is pretty great.

    If you’re set on silpoly, maybe grab some cascade mountain tech poles at first to get the hang of things?  I like the pole length being adjustable, I think going to something fixed could cause some learning curve headaches as well as take away from some of the tent’s adjustability for conditions.

    #3753571
    Todd T
    BPL Member

    @texasbb

    Locale: Pacific Northwest

    I like the pole length being adjustable, I think going to something fixed could cause some learning curve headaches as well as take away from some of the tent’s adjustability for conditions.

    ^This.  It depends on the tent, I guess.  I occasionally use fixed-length poles with my Tarptent Notch, and it’s always worked fine, but I’m not at all confident my X-Mid 2 would be as forgiving of dips/rises on the site.

    #3753574
    Dustin V
    BPL Member

    @dustinv

    A lot of vendors do sell separate poles specifically for their shelters, since some folks want to use them bikepacking, paddling… They look like they break down to be easily packed.

    #3753575
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    From a weight perspective, not really. I don’t use trekking poles so when looking at trekking pole tents I need to add in the weight, bulk, and cost of added support poles for an apples to apples comparison with “free standing” tents. Usually the weight savings of a trekking pole tent becomes moot or insignificant enough that the additional fuss factor isn’t worth it (for me). With that being said, single pole mids are a different equation and you can still see decent weight and bulk savings over more traditional options. Currently, I use a Locus Gear Khufu (16 ounces) w/ a Ruta Locura carbon fiber adjustable pole (~5 ounces). Add a groundsheet, or sometimes an inner net tent if bugs are bad, and I’m still seeing a decent weight, and bulk, savings over a more traditional “free standing” tent.

    #3753580
    Erik G
    BPL Member

    @fox212

    Locale: Central Coast

    Trekking pole tents are certainly less compelling from a weight perspective if you don’t use trekking poles. But with trekking pole tents at least the poles are useful for something other than pitching the tent. :)

    #3753610
    Johan
    BPL Member

    @johan-river

    Locale: Cascadia

    One huge bonus with with trekking pole tents is that even without the trekking poles, it’s super easy to get a stick and put it into there with a sock or something on the top tip against the tent. Makes for nice backup for if someone is using a single trekking pole and breaks it. Just swap in a stick.

    That’s harder to do with free standing tents.

     

    #3753641
    Jo P.
    BPL Member

    @sedimentary

    Locale: Denver, CO

    I do think there are a large variety of trekking pole tents that have much more headroom than their freestanding competitors in the same weight class, so if headroom matters to you it could be worth it just for that. Headroom while sitting up, that is. While lying down they tend to be worse.

    #3753797
    David Gardner
    BPL Member

    @gearmaker

    Locale: Northern California

    I just made this trekking pole substitute for my Zpacks Pocket Tarp from 3 pieces of 18″ CF tubing I had in my shop. Large wire nuts screw onto the ends for more contact area. I suppose I could get away with just one for the top. For the top I hot glued 2 furniture/stool “feet” feet together, the smaller of which has a hole that the wire nuts fit into perfectly. I made this for bikepacking, primarily because my trekking poles are 2-piece and only pack down to 30″ long, which is a pain to pack on the bike. This pole packs down to 19.” I could get it down to 16″ if I cut all 3 segments, but I wanted to leave two of them at 18″ in case I want to use them for something else some day. The 3 oz weight savings is nice too.

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