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Bounding around SEKI with most of our tendons attached


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  • #3628764
    Adam White
    BPL Member

    @awhite4777

    Locale: On the switchbacks

    Well, it’s that time again, when I spout off to this mostly-empty auditorium with tales of recent adventure.

    This is from a trip in September of 2019. It was a pretty ad-hoc adventure, inasmuch as our original plans (and the permit we’d reserved–Taboose Pass) went up in the literal flames of the Taboose Fire. We audibled walk-up permits out of Roads End, and the rest… well, there’s a link below.

    I decided to turn this TR into a pdf before posting. This seems to be solve a couple of problems:

    1) I don’t want the locations to be searchable to the internet masses. I think this too readily vomits information out into the universe, and such things can’t be unvomited. We shrink the wilderness when we do this, inasmuch as wilderness is wild and–even if not unknown–there presently aren’t GPS tracks and specific route descriptions for everywhere you might want to wander. I hope to keep it this way, or at least postpone and delay our communal de-wildernessing through blogs/TR. Posting directly into BPL makes this searchable. So, vomit.

    2) Sometimes I write these on a blog that I have, but it’s free, and consequently, it has ads. I don’t like to look at ads, and I don’t want you to have to either.

    So a pdf solves that. Huzzah! Of course, the typography and whatnot takes a while.

    Here’s the trip report. It is just as ridiculously wordy as every other trip report I write, no matter how concise I try to be: https://ontheswitchbacks.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/tr_roadsend2019-1.pdf

    ________

    #3628767
    Adam White
    BPL Member

    @awhite4777

    Locale: On the switchbacks

    Huh. Well, I guess you get one edit of that first post, but no more.

    If you just want the mountain eye candy, pics are here: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHbJjaS

    #3628776
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    That first photo blows me away. So much lovey granite!

    #3628789
    Brad Rogers
    BPL Member

    @mocs123

    Locale: Southeast Tennessee

    Nice shots and TR.    Thank you for sharing your adventure with us!

     

    #3628869
    Steve Thompson
    BPL Member

    @stevet

    Locale: Northeast

    Enjoyed your verbosity.  Great trip.

    Agree, East Lake should be seen at least once.  Or in my case once every 46 years or so though at that pace there may not be a next time.

    #3628908
    wansun s
    BPL Member

    @songsta

    Excellent!  Your trip reports are some of my favorite things to read.

    #3628961
    Alex Wallace
    BPL Member

    @feetfirst

    Locale: Sierra Nevada North

    “Oh, c’mon. How wordy could it…HOLY 47 PAGES!” I thoroughly enjoyed it all. Thanks for sharing.

    #3628972
    dirtbag
    BPL Member

    @dirtbaghiker

    Holy!! That is just awesome. Everything about it. Good for you man!!

    #3628981
    Adam White
    BPL Member

    @awhite4777

    Locale: On the switchbacks

    Thanks all!

    That first photo blows me away. So much lovey granite!

    It is the aptly-named Granite Basin (and the Comb Spur, beyond it).

    #3628987
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    That’s a great name!

    #3629139
    obx hiker
    BPL Member

    @obxer

    Thank you for a thoroughly entertaining trip report. You’re a gifted writer with an eye for beauty and a wry sense of the pretty much every day absurdity of most of us peeps.

    “such things can’t be unvomited.”

    I like the idea of keeping the subject out of the all-seeing Eye of Sauron*; which reference probably (correctly-sigh) identifies me as a clueless boomer; but I’d like to make sure I’ve got this evasion worked out correctly. If you posted the report directly on/into BPL the entire report would be searchable; but since you only posted the link (name of link) only the name is searchable? Still I got a surprising #  of hits based on a search for “roadsend2”; Including one about Bubbscreek with lot’s of Seki photos! Who’d athunk? Anyway feel free to painfully ‘splain to this boomer brain.

    Hope Andy’s arm is OK and glad you got the right tooth drilled. WTAF on that anyway? and why no antibiotic?

    Next time the nut won’t budge try standing on the lug nut wrench. Make sure it’s on solidly or it might fly off and bean you! and maybe give the person standing on it a hand for balance. Then you can kind of stomp or jump a little. Lots more leverage.

    • that bunch is testing a 3-d version of g-maps; which might be kind of cool for checking off-trail routes but in the section I’ve studied in SE Utah near Bluff clearly shows a cliff dwelling tucked back into an alcove. (if you know where to look for it) Should the 3-d become widely available anyone of the nearly or effectively legion of people out there who know where or how to look can find every single cliff dwelling in existence. So much for ruins seldom seen.
    #3629152
    Adam White
    BPL Member

    @awhite4777

    Locale: On the switchbacks

    Thanks for the kind words, obxhiker.

    So, the evasion tactics. I don’t believe this to be any sort of ironclad box that I’m putting things in, but the idea is:

    Sometimes we hike off the beaten path a bit, and that’s what I worry about disseminating too rapidly. The trails–well, the trails are fine. People hike the trails all the time, and there are already books that divulge those experiences in great detail. Besides, trails are basically 1d adventures. You go forward or backwards on the trail. There are discrete choices at junctions, and that’s it. So there never was that much to discover to begin with.

    Off the trail, though, we can be a bit more careful. If all of the information–detailed route finding descriptions, annotated photos, gpx tracks–if all of that is out there, there’s no adventure for the next person; just the choice of which slabs to hop on as they make their way at 337 degrees across the first of three talus fields.

    So my goal is to not have someone search for an obscure off-trail pass, and bring up my photos and descriptions (which are still intentionally vague–I don’t want to spoil the adventure of a reader either!). Take a cross-country pass, for example. If I copy and paste directly into the BPL forums, then a web search may bring it up (it still may not, because Google tends to be smart enough to know that if you’re looking for something useful, one of my trip reports is not where you want to be!). For example, let’s make up a pass… call it “Beige Spoon Pass”. If one Googles that pass, they won’t come up with my TR, because that information is in a pdf that is uploaded to an obscure, rarely-visited blog. It’s probably not searchable at all.

    (Example: A Google search for “with most of our tendons attached” only returns BPL, not the pdf hosted on that obscure blog, which contains those very words.)

    Unfortunately, we’re kind of going in the wrong direction–we’re accelerating the de-unknowning of the wilderness. I think the most impactful factor in this is quite simple: it is that people keep making up routes, then naming them, then writing guides to hiking those routes. Then–lo and behold–people come flocking, because it’s a Thing, and there’s a guide, and we’re all completionists–we love doing Things. Let’s do that Thing! Then they write about it, and soon it achieves critical mass, and a use trail with infinite footprints.

    Ten years ago, if you searched for Beige Spoon Pass, you’d get one measly page on High Sierra Topix, and maybe a vague, sandbaggy reference out of Secor. Now, you get blogs.

    This is both a recent phenomenon, and obvious in cause and effect. It’s probably controversial, but I say: We don’t need more named routes.

    (Roper gets a pass–he wrote his book in 1982, before one could even fathom such a result.)

    And it’s not just because the crowds flock to the named routes–but it’s the question: Where is the adventure in hiking someone else’s route? I mean sure, there’s always some adventure, but isn’t a lot of it in creating your own route, and owning all of the “where to next” decisions? I mean, it is for me. I want others to experience that; it’s rewarding and empowering. I know this undoubtedly has a HYOH tinge to it, but I’ve always been surprised to discover that it seems that the vast majority of hikers just go and hike something that someone else named and wrote about. I don’t get it. I mean I do; I hiked the JMT; it was a named Thing and I wanted to do a Thing so I did it. But after that–is it just the comfort of knowing it’s a Thing for most, so you know you can’t be doing anything too crazy?

    Anyway, now I just upload pdfs and yell at the kids to stop naming routes and get off my lawn.

    I guess I better step down carefully from this soapbox, lest I injure myself… Just one opinion among many, where none are wrong or right.

    Regarding the stuck lug nut: I think the surprise was that it all happened before Andy was straining too hard. It wasn’t one of those situations where he pushed and it wouldn’t go; then he pushed again and it wouldn’t go; then he paused and looked at me, and then pushed again–it was just a thing where he pushed, then pushed a little harder–then POP, and it was done, before he ever got to the point of questioning whether or not additional leverage (not coming from a bicep tendon) was needed.

    I’m actually thinking of just throwing a cheater bar in my trunk for future stuck lug nuts. I’ve come pretty close to injuring myself jumping on a tire iron too–a cheater bar seems safer for someone with my level of coordination.

    #3629167
    Rex Sanders
    BPL Member

    @rex

    Locale: California

    Google has indexed PDFs and returned search results for a long, long time. Our omniscient online overlord will find your PDF sooner or later and deliver your opus to the frantically searching masses.

    If you want true obscurity for a few more years, post page images only. But OCR will also fix that problem sooner or later.

    On hand-crafted web sites, a “robots.txt” file asks search engines nicely to back off. Most comply, mostly. Don’t know if that’s an option on a WordPress-hosted site like yours, and you probably want to block that precise file, not your entire blog.

    — Rex

    #3629168
    Adam White
    BPL Member

    @awhite4777

    Locale: On the switchbacks

    @rex, Yes–that’s true regarding indexing.Of course, this was never meant to be an absolute barrier. Just a way of impeding the irreversible, unstoppable oozing…

    I’m pretty sure that by the time our omniscient online overlord discovers this, it will have sufficient AI to conclude: “This… this should not be in the canon of mankind.” Delete.

    And, problem solved.

     

     

     

    #3629183
    matthew k
    Moderator

    @matthewkphx

    I just finished the TR. enjoyable as always. Thanks for sharing and thanks for your thoughtful approach to which details you share.

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