Topic

Best material for building up a shoe’s outsole?


Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) Best material for building up a shoe’s outsole?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #3706353
    PaulW
    BPL Member

    @peweg8

    Locale: Western Colorado

    I’m looking for a way to extend the life of the outsoles on several pairs of trail runners I hike in. I tend to wear out the area under the balls of my feet very quickly. I’ve tried using Shoe Goo, but it doesn’t hold up at all. Thanks for any tips.

    #3706456
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    If Shoe Goo does not work, then I can’t think of anything else.

    Cheers

    #3706470
    James Marco
    BPL Member

    @jamesdmarco

    Locale: Finger Lakes

    I have used Weldwood Contact Cement (original formula.) Depending on the plastic/rubber, you spread it in fairly thick layer to both sides. Wait until you can touch it. The place the piece over the ball area and clamp lightly…just till it starts oozing out. Wait a few days then unclamp it.Trim/grind all edges to about 45* to ensure you don’t get them caught on rocks, etc. I had one pair of shoes last well over 3000mi with just a bit of help. Note you could also try multiple layers of the glue with some coarse sawdust for a more temporary fix.

    #3706502
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    I have not used Shoe Goo… but years ago a guy at REI told me to use the McNett/GearAid product which is now called “Aquaseal +SR” (used to be called “Free Sole”) instead as it is tougher and holds up better. I have used this product on new trail runners to create toe boxes (before they are damaged by rocks), cover vulnerable seams, cover vulnerable fabric at the sides where there can be abrasion, and to glue lugs that are pealing off. This is VERY tough stuff and can extend the life of trail runners that were never designed to hold up to rocky trails. I use this product on vulnerable areas of NEW trail runner right out of the box before first use. As with all glues and caulks, a clean and ruff surface holds the treatment better… so before applying I clean with alcohol and the ruff the area up with some sand paper. YMMV

     

    #3706510
    Steve
    BPL Member

    @steve-2

    Locale: Eastern Washington

    Both Marco and DWR’s combined ideas might be the way to go.  Here’s what I would try:

    On new/unused soles:

    1. Clean the area with a strong solvent (paint thinner, alcohol,etc)

    2.  Apply one coat of the Weldwood contact cement and lightly sprinkle with a pinch of clean sand and let it cure for the required time

    3. Add 2-3 additional coats of the contact cement with another  sprinkle of sand on the last coat (adds traction for your outer layer) & let it cure overnight

    4.  Apply the “Aquaseal+SR” (or Shoe Goo) as the final/outer layer and trim the edges as described by Marco.

    PS  Please report back on what you end up trying…and how well it works.

     

    #3706538
    DWR D
    BPL Member

    @dwr-2

    “I’m looking for a way to extend the life of the outsoles on several pairs of trail runners I hike in. I tend to wear out the area under the balls of my feet very quickly.”

    I don’t know what particular trail runners you are having this issue with… but I have seen several models over several brands that use a spongy foam that does not were well at all. I assume they use this to save weight. They often use this from the ball of the foot rearward in the central section of the tread… the outer sections being more durable rubber. If it is the spongy foam like stuff that is the issue for you, I don’t think any of the methods discussed above is going to help much… hard to get something durable to stick to something like this. Hard to get something that hard to stick to something that is soft. If this is the case, you might look at trail runners that have Vibram soles… (there are several now) they hold up MUCH better. Or find an old pair of trail runners with some Vibram sole and cut a slice of that off and then try gluing that to the area.

    #3706545
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    I learn something new every day. Free Sole and Weldwood – thank you.

    But I agree with DWR: some shoe soles are not made to have a long life. They can not be ‘improved’.

    Cheers

    #3707001
    PaulW
    BPL Member

    @peweg8

    Locale: Western Colorado

    Thanks for the tips folks. I’ll definitely report back my progress.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Forum Posting

A Membership is required to post in the forums. Login or become a member to post in the member forums!

Loading...