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how cold can you use a liquid feed canister stove?


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Home Forums Gear Forums Gear (General) how cold can you use a liquid feed canister stove?

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  • #2158761
    Larry De La Briandais
    BPL Member

    @hitech

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    122 F is the temperature of the hot water at my house. I can keep my hand in water at that temperature, but it is very uncomfortable. A canister would certainly feel HOT. I was just surprise that it burt at only double that temperature. I would have expected triple that. I am not sure how quickly a canister would heat up, but several minutes of inattention could be a problem.

    It does make a water bath seem like a good method of temperature regulation.

    #2158797
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    > 122 F/50 C is not so hot you can't touch it – just "warm" or "hot"
    Not really how I would put it.

    It is generally recognised that 40 C is about the limit for an 'ouch' response. That is, above 40 C you tend to go 'ouch' and quickly remove contact. Yes, that is just above body temperature. So the DoT requirement that ALL canisters be able to take 50 C is a smart move. Anyone can check for that quite easily.

    > If the top of the canister that is facing the burner, but there's not fuel there, it
    > will get warmer. Even warmer than 122 F. I think this is okay.
    Not in my classroom thank you.

    If the top of the canister is above 50 C then you are DEFINITELY getting into danger territory. You would only have to jiggle the canister slightly for the fuel to hit a bit of metal above 50 C.

    Actually, you will find your stove really roaring even at 40 C. You should avoid ever letting it get that hot imho.

    Yes, I know I harp on about this, but an exploding gas canister is really really dangerous.

    Cheers

    #2158801
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    seems like even without a windscreen, the top of canister gets warm

    not 50 C though

    I'll have to try it and check it

    #2158893
    Hikin’ Jim
    BPL Member

    @hikin_jim

    Locale: Orange County, CA, USA

    I am not sure how quickly a canister would heat up, but several minutes of inattention could be a problem.

    It does make a water bath seem like a good method of temperature regulation.

    Exactly. And I think in general chemical hand warmers are fairly safe, but you have to pack those in and out. What do you do for a week long trip?

    Some methods could be a little scary. You could for example put a full 360 degree windscreen on a canister stove with a nice big pot on top. All that nice heat, trapped. And just how does one monitor a fully enclosed set up like that? No thank you.

    The copper wire through the flame trick is a little better, but you still had better be checking the canister frequently.

    Did you see the chart in the Appendix of my post on canisters in cold? Notice that the green line (the freezing point of water) is always warmer than the temperature needed for your stove to operate well (assuming you've brought good fuel). Safe AND effective. Good combo, yes?

    HJ
    Adventures in Stoving
    Hikin Jim's Blog

    #2158924
    Larry De La Briandais
    BPL Member

    @hitech

    Locale: SF Bay Area

    "Did you see the chart in the Appendix of my post on canisters in cold?… Notice that the green line (the freezing point of water) is always warmer than the temperature needed for your stove to operate well (assuming you've brought good fuel). Safe AND effective. Good combo, yes?"

    Yup, read the entire article back when you first wrote it. I always read your stuff when I come across it. :^)

    Since I first heard of the idea here (I think it was Rodger I heard it from first) of using a water bath to keep a canister warm enough, I've always thought it a good idea. Now that I know the bursting point of a canister is so low, it seems like a perfect temperature regulator. The water will "adsorb" a lot of heat before getting anywhere near hot. And it has plenty of stored energy to give back. Perfect if you ask me. :^)

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