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Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review


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Home Forums Campfire Editor’s Roundtable Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review

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  • #1264830
    Addie Bedford
    BPL Member

    @addiebedford

    Locale: Montana

    Companion forum thread to:

    Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review

    #1658255
    Dan Durston
    BPL Member

    @dandydan

    Locale: Canadian Rockies

    Thanks for the review. It looks a little too narrow and low on headroom to be my 2 person tent of choice.

    I'm hoping that the Easton Kilo will live up to it's claimed specs of a 910g weight, 44" roof height and a 56" x 91" floor when it comes out in the spring. If it can get close to that, it'll be a much more livable 2 person tent for less weight.

    #1658449
    Lucas Boyer
    BPL Member

    @jhawkwx

    Locale: 38.97˚N, 95.26˚W

    Thanks Will. I looked at a few 2 person "lightweight" tents for my wife and I, plus our K9 troop. The lack of space and price points sent me to a Mid. With the mid I can set up the mid only to ride out afternoon storms or just sleep under it when the dogs aren't along. When conditions dictate, I can set up the bug shelter underneath. Sure, I don't have the weight savings of the Lizard, but I'm 6'5" and my sanity/marriage depend on a bit of elbow room in the morning/evening.

    #1658504
    Keith Roush
    BPL Member

    @skier

    Locale: San Juan Mountains

    Great report. I think I'll continue to use a single-wall tent in blustery/rainy/snowy conditions when I don't use a tarp or mid. My single walls never sag when wet and have very little wind noise.

    I use a Black Diamond Lighthouse for backpacking and some lightweight motorcycle touring (Durango-Maine-Quebec-Durango last year) and a Bibler Awahnee for more extreme conditions above 15,000 or Winter mountaineering. Both of these set up very tight with no pegs at the floor but 2-4 midpoint guylines to rocks, skis or brush.

    #1658515
    Mike W
    BPL Member

    @skopeo

    Locale: British Columbia

    #1658519
    Greg Mihalik
    BPL Member

    @greg23

    Locale: Colorado

    The hooped pole and side entry design links the "comparable" tents.

    The Fly Creek is far different, and IMHO, has far less usable volume.

    #1658620
    Mike W
    BPL Member

    @skopeo

    Locale: British Columbia

    #1659048
    Cas Berentsen
    BPL Member

    @p9qx

    According to Sackundpack (german outdoor shop) the moment weighs 830g, the scarp 1 with solid inner weighs 1442g and the scarp 2 1750g. If those measurements are accurate the Scarps are far less attractive.

    I own a 1p terra nova laser comp (TNLC). Although its claimed weight is 890g, the weight for normal usage (incl. decent pegs + polecover) is +/-1050g. This makes the Power lizard even a decent alternative for the TNLC, although its headspace of 89cm might be too limited for a person of 6'4".

    ( Other Characteristics of the TNLC are similar to the Laser and the Power lizard. Warm but condensation prone and poor ventilation )

    For a solo hiker equipped with hiking poles the lightheart solo (27oz/765g advertised) might be a decent alternative.

    #1659131
    Gordon Bedford
    BPL Member

    @gbedford

    Locale: Victoria, Australia

    Perhaps I have missed something but what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot separate the fly from the inner. Unless the inner of the fly can be dried before it is packed then the whole lot will become wet.

    Thanks for the review.
    Gordon

    #1659145
    Franco Darioli
    Spectator

    @franco

    Locale: Gauche, CU.

    My Scarp 1 was 1260g when delivered before seam sealing.
    (each batch is a bit different)
    That is fly/inner/stff sac and pole.
    The supplied Easton pegs (6x 8') are 90g however that is not a fair comparison with the TN type.
    Weight is important but of course usable space headroom and ventilation are important too ….
    Note that the total covered area is about 2 feet larger under the Scarp 1.
    oh, and yes you can detach the inner if you like.
    Franco

    #1659174
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    > what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot
    > separate the fly from the inner.

    Well, in many years of snow camping with a double-wall tunnel tent (which I never split up), that has never been a problem. If the condensation is water, it seems to evaporate and dry off fairly easily. Anyhow, the light inner fabric cannot hold much water, so there's little to worry about. And pitching the inner first in pouring rain is simply stupid imho.

    And if the condensation is ice … well, tough. I do remember once opening my tent up 2 days later after we had got home, and the ice fell out of it. Fortunately, I did that outside! Normally, the inner tent sheds the ice next evening.

    It really is NOT a problem, ever.

    Cheers

    #1659254
    Johnathan White
    Member

    @johnatha1

    Locale: PNW

    Anyone other than me notice a pattern evolving here?

    Pretty soon I bet we will see a 2-person, double walled tent tipping the scales at 20 oz. with a whopping 16 Sq’ of floor space.

    I do not know if they are just trying to market the "2-person tents" as simply a roomy one person, but tents are starting to shrink to the square feet of most of my 1-person tarps and tents.

    I understand the quest to go lighter, but let's compare apples to apples, not grapes to apples.

    #1659757
    Gordon Bedford
    BPL Member

    @gbedford

    Locale: Victoria, Australia

    Well Roger I would say that you have about ten more years of experience of walking and snow camping than my 38 but obviously different experiences influence ones thinking and preferences.

    I also prefer a "double wall pitch the fly first" style tents. But day after day of walking in the rain, when it is raining when the tent is pitched and raining when it is packed away can cause you to have a wet fly inside and out. I have seen and experienced tents packed up as one unit and they become wet miserable affairs. It is fine if the weather is nice in the morning or in the afternoon. The tent will dry out, both inner and fly. That is also my experience with tarptents, not that I dislike them. Horses for courses.

    The other great thing about being able to split the inner and unpitch the fly last is that when the winds are blowing and the rain is falling you can pull down the inner, sit under the fly nicely sheltered and pack your gear, put on your wet weather coat etc then venture out into the storm to whip down the fly.

    By the way I also have "pitch the inner first" style tents and it is possible to pitch and unpitch them when it is raining (but not too windy)without getting the inner wet. Admittedly it works best with at least three or four people.

    But the result of my experience and that is not just my own tents but 1000's of school kids worth of tent nights plus trips with friends; is that I would never buy a tent where the inner couldn't be separated from the fly.

    Best regards,
    Gordon

    #1659760
    Roger Caffin
    BPL Member

    @rcaffin

    Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe

    Hi Gordon

    > I have seen and experienced tents packed up as one unit and they become wet miserable affairs.
    Different tents maybe?
    My experience has mainly been with the Macpac Olympus and my 2-man double-wall 3 and 4 pole tents. Yeah, I've had a wet inner tent many times. But the walls on all those tents don't hold much water – maybe a good DWR on the inner tent. So they are not a problem.

    > The other great thing about being able to split the inner and unpitch the fly last
    > is that when the winds are blowing and the rain is falling you can pull
    > down the inner, sit under the fly nicely sheltered and pack your gear, put
    > on your wet weather coat etc then venture out into the storm to whip down the fly.
    ??????? Huh ?????? (sorry)
    I can't count the number of times we have fully dressed and fully packed inside the tent in a storm, then right at the end pulled it down as a single unit, packed it away on the top of my pack and started walking. How else would one do it?

    I guess if you want to split the tent after it has been pulled down it might get messy, but I haven't done that in 20 years. I find it simply unnecessary: we share weight in other ways. And keeping the tent together is so much faster!

    > pitch the inner first" style tents …. it works best with at least three or four people.
    Ah yes, I have seen videos of groups pitching tents in a storm. Very amusing, some of them. But I have to be able to pitch and strike our tunnel tent single-handed in a storm – which I can do very easily. Even if I have to crawl around the tent, as in "When Things Go Wrong".

    > I would never buy a tent where the inner couldn't be separated from the fly.
    Not going to argue with you there. ALL my double-skin tents can be split. Great stuff, Velcro. I just never split them in the field.

    Cheers

    #1659852
    John Davis
    Member

    @bukidnon

    "Perhaps I have missed something but what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot separate the fly from the inner. Unless the inner of the fly can be dried before it is packed then the whole lot will become wet."

    In my experience, Gordon, I end up carrying the condensation to my next pitch. I have never successfully shaken all of the rain and condensation off a tent and prefer not to hang around until Britain's weak sun dries the shelter, so I end up hauling water I can't drink.

    Disconnecting the Akto's inner is a slight pain, given its 14 points of attachment, but has to be done when the fly is wet or everything ends up soaked. I can't see it being any different for any other all in one pitching tent. Water gets on everything once it's inside the shelter's stuff sack.

    I have pitched tents at lunchtime, and for out and back summit dashes, to dry them out but that just attracts more rain.

    #1659863
    David Ure
    Member

    @familyguy

    "Disconnecting the Akto's inner is a slight pain, given its 14 points of attachment, but has to be done when the fly is wet or everything ends up soaked. I can't see it being any different for any other all in one pitching tent. Water gets on everything once it's inside the shelter's stuff sack."

    Strange – I have never had the inner wetted out in this case. Are you leaving the door open on the inner?

    #1660824
    Gordon Bedford
    BPL Member

    @gbedford

    Locale: Victoria, Australia

    I agree John. I disconnect my Akto inner if the fly is wet before I pack up. Just trying to keep my inner drier.Of course as Roger has pointed out pitching and unpitching with both connected is quicker. That's the beauty of that style of tent.

    I first encountered fly "pitched first tents" in The UK back in 1980. I bought one. They made sense in wet environments, which can be true of SE Australia (especially Tasmanania) at times. I bought a Fjallraven two pole A frame in 1976. It could be pitched that way also with a bit of fiddling. Obviously the Scandanavians were experimenting and the Hilleberg tents being the outcome. The Kiwis were developing their own versions about then also.

    All the best,
    Gordon

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