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Suggestions for a sleeping pad?


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  • #1217870
    Jeff Black
    Member

    @thehikingdude

    I’m currently using a Big Agnes REM Air Core Long Pad (just under 1 lb 14 oz.) and after getting a Montbell Bag the sleeping pad weighs more than the bag. That’s just wrong.

    Should I look at using a 3/4 pad and using my pack for the lower part? Any suggestions are appreciated.

    -jeff

    p.s. Sorry for all the recent posts. I’m new here and am happy to find such a friendly bunch of folks.

    #1351286
    paul johnson
    Member

    @pj

    Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest

    Yes. You’re correct. Try the GossamerGear Nightlight pads. In colder weather you could also use a longer GG ThinLight pad under your entire body, or just under the part not on the NightLight pad – if your pack is not providing sufficient insulation in the cold.

    #1351288
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    “I’m currently using a Big Agnes REM Air Core Long Pad (just under 1 lb 14 oz.) and after getting a Montbell Bag the sleeping pad weighs more than the bag. That’s just wrong.”

    Jeff,

    What’s really “Wrong” is a miserable nights sleep!

    There are pads out there that weigh as little as 1.9 ounces (Gossamer Gear ThinLight Pad) and of course many others that weigh as much or even more then your Big Agnes REM Air Core Long Pad. You need to determine where your comfort level is. Some may consider a full-length 2.5” thick pad a luxury item and others a necessity for a good nights sleep. Personally I have owned many pads (including the above mentioned) over the years and have found the Big Agnes Air Core Full Length Mummy Pad 2.5” thick at 23 oz. one of the most comfortable pads I’ve ever slept on.

    Regards

    #1351289
    paul johnson
    Member

    @pj

    Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest

    Jeff, Roger makes a good point. I’m purely a back sleeper and the 3/4″ thick (peaks of eggcrate cut; 1/4″ thick valleys) GG Nightlight pad works perfect for me; all night comfortable. I’ve heard others who are side or front sleepers, or tosser-and-turners who don’t like the closed cell pads like the GG Nightlight. Another important point, is even if you are a back sleeper, if the areas that you frequent don’t provide a good, soft, naturally padded bivouac area then these thinner (as cp. to the 2.5″ thick air core pads) may not be to your liking (who wants a rock in the ribs all night?). You just can’t be at your best on a multi-day trek if you didn’t sleep well and get plenty of recovery time after a long day and many miles on the trail. For me, where I can find plenty of soft, off trail bivies, those thick, heavy pads/mattresses are totally unecessary. But then, I’m not familiar with your neck of the woods or sleep style. As they say, “Hike your own hike”.

    #1351290
    Ryan Faulkner
    BPL Member

    @ryanf

    My favorite sleeping pad I have used was a thermarest ridge rest pad cut to my torso size weighing in at exactly 5oz. It is super warm and suprisingly comfortable for a foam pad. I just could not take sleeping on those 3/4″ blue foam mats any longer, I have had better nights sleep with out a pad at all.

    I have used it down to 15 degrees and my torso was warm enough, but due to inadequate insulation under my legs, I was cold and uncomfortable.

    But I have never really had a bad experience with it. it works perfectly as a frame in both my G6 and jam packs and is lighter than any inflatable pad.

    #1351291
    Marion Watts
    BPL Member

    @mdwattsjr

    I second the Nitelites, great pads.

    #1351292
    Stephen Eggleston
    Member

    @happycamper

    Locale: South Bayish

    There was another recent thread on a very similar topic, reading it might provide you insight. Also there are reviews of a variety of pads, both foam and inflatable, somewhere on this site, definitely worth a read.

    Of course weight is important. Warmth and comfort are also important. Finding the lightest pad that meets your comfort needs and the environment’s warmth needs is a good way to go. Regarding warmth, the right pad can really boost your sleep system’s temp rating.

    I am partial to the ridgerest. I find it comfortable and not too heavy. It is definitely heavier than a blue foamy or some of the other 3/8-3/4 foam mats out there. I like insulation under my legs and therefore cut down the mat to fit from heels to shoulders. I use my clothing under my neck and head.

    Pacific outdoor equipment makes a bunch of innovative inflatables. You might check out their selection and weights.

    #1351296
    Glenn Roberts
    Member

    @garkjr

    Locale: Southwestern Ohio

    Pj’s advice to hike your own hike was perfect, as was Stephen’s to balance weight, warmth, and comfort.

    It’s easy to be seduced by light weight (and the bragging rights that go with a 5-pound base weight.) I know I was. But I found that I didn’t sleep as comfortably. That wasn’t a problem on one-night weekends. But, by the second or third night of using a Nightlite pad, my hips were extremely stiff and sore (OK, I’ll admit that I’m a creaky old fart – but I also frequently sleep on rock ledges for the low impact and the view) – which made the pack ride worse, which made the trip less fun. I finally woke up, and now gladly carry a Thermarest Prolite 3 – not the lightest, but it works for me.

    You may find yourself using several pads – a torso length closed cell pad in the summer, when you’re on forest duff, a thicker and longer (bulkier) Nightlight-style pad for cooler weather (or, like pj suggested, two pads), and a self-inflater for hard surfaces or colder weather. There may not be any one right answer.

    At the risk of having my membership to BPL cancelled, and being hunted down like a dog by pj – ;) – light weight isn’t everything.

    #1351298
    Jeff Black
    Member

    @thehikingdude

    Thanks to all for reminding me that weight isn’t everything. I know I wouldn’t use an uncomfortable pack just because it’s lighter than one that is.

    Part of my problem is I have sleep apnea and normally sleep with a CPAP machine. Some of you might know what I’m talking about. Therefore my sleep is pretty much horrible when I’m not at home in my soft warm bed. However, my sleep is also affected by the comfort level as well, so sleeping on an uncomfortable pad would only make it worse.

    I will look into all of your suggestions and see what’s out there. I’d taken a brief look on-line at the Thermarest Prolite 3 and the Insul Mat line. I am the type that flops around all night long.

    My wife is out of town for the weekend so last night I left the bedroom windows open and slept in my Montbell hugger #3 just to make sure it would work out for me. Needless to say I loved it.

    Looks like I need to “weigh” all of my choices.

    Thanks, Jeff

    #1351299
    Ryan Faulkner
    BPL Member

    @ryanf

    Jeff,

    I dont know if you knew this, but montbell sells a sleeping pad on their american site. it is hard to find so here is a link

    Mont Bell Compact Mattress L

    #1351300
    Jeff Black
    Member

    @thehikingdude

    Thanks! That looks very promising.

    -jeff

    #1351303
    Jeff Black
    Member

    @thehikingdude

    This looks like a possible option. Only 8 oz.

    über-lite

    -jeff

    #1351305
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Good luck Jeff with your quest for a good nights sleep

    After finding a great fitting pair of hiking shoes I think the comfort of the sleeping pad is the second most difficult piece of equipment to dial in… It all comes down to your personal choice and of course that endless struggle of Comfort vs. Weight!

    #1351330
    Jeff Black
    Member

    @thehikingdude

    I’m going to give the Big Agnes Air Core Pad 3/4 Length a try. Same thing as I have now, just shorter. Should do the trick while knocking off about 13 oz.

    -jeff

    #1351331
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Jeff,

    Instead of the Big Agnes Air Core ¾ Pad Dim: 48”x20”x2.5”, Weight: 16oz. you might consider for an additional 3oz you could get an incredibly comfortable reg. size Big Agnes Air Core Mummy Pad $49.95 (REI) Includes sil-nylon stuff sack and repair kit., Dim: 72”x20”x2.5”, Packed Size: 4”x8”, Weight: 19oz.

    I’ve used mine for a couple years now from the California’s Sierras to Utah’s Canyonlands and it has performed flawlessly. This pad has survived with out puncture or leaks in some less then desirable campsites, I have never regretted its purchase. No-Bragging rights for being the lightest weight pad but you’ll have a hard time keeping your friends from wanting to borrow it.

    My2cents
    Regards

    #1351336
    Mike Clelland
    Member

    @mikeclelland

    Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)

    I’ve used the Thermarest Prolite 3 extensivly.

    I praise it highly. I sleep on my side, and and I can get my entire body on the 3/4 length pad, and I’m 6 foot tall. I need to bend my legs.

    I also use a cut down section of MEC evezote (thin BIVI size) under my torso.

    Thermarest Prolite 3 = 13.9 oz

    MEC evatoze pad = 3.6 oz (cut down)

    I use the evezote yellow pad as my back pack “frame” against my back.

    I’ve done a buncha trips with just a foamy and I really don’t sleep as comfortably.

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