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Messing with the critters


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Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
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  • #3688867
    Karen
    BPL Member

    @granolagirlak

    I’ve watched a bunch of the long distance You Tubers now, and one thing that a lot of hikers seem to do is pick up, chase, harass, feed or just annoy wildlife. Peering into nests, picking up lizards or snakes, feeding marmots and birds, chasing down mice or squirrels or insects. I find this so objectionable. There are thousands of hikers – if everyone is doing this, it has to have some negative affect on the wildlife – their rest, feeding, reproduction, etc. Am I overreacting? It seems to me that this should be part of the leave no trace ethic. But it’s apparently common, at least judging by the video. And of course people seeing the video will repeat the behavior they’re seeing. At least the rattlesnake catching might be self-limiting.

    Feeling old and grouchy today!

    #3688868
    Ryan Jordan
    Admin

    @ryan

    Locale: Central Rockies

    I hear you Karen. It makes my blood boil. I guess it makes for higher youtube video views, which makes them more $. I don’t know. It’s hard to reconcile. I used to think I was young and hip, I’m pretty happy to be considered old and grouchy like what you’re feeling today.

    #3688896
    Bonzo
    BPL Member

    @bon-zo

    Locale: Virgo Supercluster

    I’ve been waiting for literal months for the chance to use this phrase:

    “Actually, you’re not overreacting, Karen.”

    In all seriousness: I’m annoyed by this kind of behavior, too, and I’m barely out of my 30’s…but I think Ryan is correct: engaging wildlife videos have a huge impact on views, and this likely drives people to create that kind of content.  For proof of the impact, just look at how people react to well-filmed wildlife documentaries, or even a cutesy video of a pet hedgehog happily floating in a sink: hundred of thousands – if not millions – of views.  For content creators, that kind of view count is a powerful lure…and although I’ll admit that there’s very little on this planet that’s cuter than a baby bobcat playing with a piece of aluminum foil or a bunny head-bonking someone in an effort to get a piece of apple, my feelings about those events do not give me permission to involve myself past simple observation.  I, too, have concerns about how this kind of exposure either tacitly condones or outright encourages further harmful engagement with wildlife; granted, we all have to interact with wildlife in sub-optimal ways from time to time, but people making a habit of those actions is problematic in many ways..so when I start seeing too much of that behavior happening on a YouTube channel, I no longer look at that channel.

    #3688899
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    and one thing that a lot of hikers seem to do is pick up, chase, harass, feed or just annoy wildlife. Peering into nests, picking up lizards or snakes, feeding marmots and birds, chasing down mice or squirrels or insects.

     

    Give us some links please.

    #3688908
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    yeah!

    just watch critters.  Pictures are good.

    #3688946
    Paul Wagner
    BPL Member

    @balzaccom

    Locale: Wine Country

    This goes back at least as far as Colin Fletcher, who spends most of the first few hundred miles of the “Thousand Mile Summer” thinking that he needs to kill every rattlesnake he sees.  Sigh.  Very sad.

    #3688972
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    hikers saying hello to some bears…..not good :-)

    Philips video

     

    #3689008
    David Thomas
    BPL Member

    @davidinkenai

    Locale: North Woods. Far North.

    And while “DLP” (defense of life or property) bear killings are legal in Alaska, 1) it’s the State’s bear so you have to harvest the hide, skull and edible meat and turn it in to the State and 2) there are exceptions – yes, the animal carcass is your property, but you can’t kill a bear to defend it.  Also, improperly secured garbage or pet food is a citable offense and negates the DLP allowance.

    OTOH, if you have a bear tag with you. . .

    In that case, though, it wouldn’t be legal to shoot the momma with cubs.  Only a lone adult bear.

    #3689074
    Dan
    BPL Member

    @dan-s

    Locale: Colorado

    I don’t watch these videos, but based on your description, this type of behavior is totally inappropriate … unforgivable really. Also, these people are probably violating laws or regulations in some cases, and posting the evidence. So hopefully law enforcement will make an example of some of them. We’ve already seen some examples of people facing consequences based on evidence that they provided themselves.

    #3689111
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    I watched the video

    The humans were yelling “hey bear” at the bears so they knew where the humans were.  Maybe scare the bears a bit?  Definitely don’t surprise the bears with the human’s presence

    The bears were just walking along, ignoring the humans.

    That is exactly what humans should do to avoid bad bear encounters

     

    #3689113
    Bonzo
    BPL Member

    @bon-zo

    Locale: Virgo Supercluster

    I watched the video

    The humans were yelling “hey bear” at the bears so they knew where the humans were.  Maybe scare the bears a bit?  Definitely don’t surprise the bears with the human’s presence

    The bears were just walking along, ignoring the humans.

    That is exactly what humans should do to avoid bad bear encounters

    The context of that video, from another thread, was that the bears came directly in after hearing a rifle shot; mom was looking to rob the kill site…so they were most certainly not ignoring the humans.  Still, this is proper “go away” behavior on the behalf of said humans.

    #3689123
    Jerry Adams
    BPL Member

    @retiredjerry

    Locale: Oregon and Washington

    ahhh…  that makes sense

    #3689344
    Dan Y
    BPL Member

    @zelph2

    messin with the critters

     

    YouTube video

    #3689998
    Miner
    BPL Member

    @miner

    Locale: SoCAL

    For a humerous example of messing with wildlife, there are these old commercials, which I admit to liking quite a bit.

     

    But some more serious examples, after a few minutes of searching, though the 1st one doesn’t really fit the OP point. Though these aren’t long distance hikers which would require having to search through a long vlog post instead of just a highlight video. But you do see some of the same things.

    Man taunts Bison to get on the news

    Video of couple that likes to feed wild animals like racoons and possums.

    Feeding deer strawberries.

    Man thinks he is the snake whisperer.

    Feeding a bear snacks.

     

    #3690014
    Philip Tschersich
    BPL Member

    @philip-ak

    Locale: Kodiak Alaska

    Sorry for the thread creep, but if anyone wants a little more context on the “Jellyroll Bear Cub” video posted above, skip ahead to minute 3:50 of this video.

    #3690048
    Diane “Piper” Soini
    BPL Member

    @sbhikes

    Locale: Santa Barbara

    I’ve watched a lot of long distance hiker videos and never once saw anyone harass wildlife. Dixie does amazing tiny wildlife shots. There was one where she captured on film a tiny crab spider grabbing a mosquito. There was one where she captured on film a mountain lion. All she did was stand there and hope it would go away, which is exactly what I would have done. I don’t think Darwin ever notices the wildlife. Elina Osbourne’s videos were mostly of her own face. Many others I have watched over the years are very similar to each other. A lot of talk about the people, making the miles, climbing the passes, bandaging the blisters. I used to subscribe to the PCT-L and there was once a group that was reported to have chased and tried (I don’t remember if they succeeded) to kill a marmot to eat it. They were excoriated. Trail angels were alerted to this action and swore they would refuse the perpetrators any service. Animal harassment is not really tolerated in the community.

    Anyway, I haven’t seen animal harassment as a regular or even occasional feature of long distance hikers’ videos. Maybe it all depends on what the algorithms are feeding you.

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