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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 52 total)
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  • #3644042
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    An absolutely wonderful article. The author has put into words and actions what I have been trying to do for the past number of years. I retire at the end of 2021 when I will be 67 years old. The type and style of backpacking explained in this article is exactly what I am looking for. And now I have some words to help explain it. I can’t do 100 pounds anymore but I could still do 50 and spend 3 weeks in the wilderness unsupported. I know it will be painful and more than difficult. But in 1 week I would be down to 40 pounds and at the end of the second week, I’d be down to 30 pounds. This sounds like what I will be doing most when I retire. Walking 20+ miles a day just does not appeal to me as much anymore, at least not yet. Now I just need to find the places where I can hide out for 21 days without a lot of exposure to other people. I love the solitude of wilderness.

    Thanks for the wonderful and insightful article.

    #3574408
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I have been at BPL since around 2005 or 2006. I don’t ever recall anything remotely discriminatory or harassing in nature. So that is a good thing. Keep up the good work BPL members.

    #3492180
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Great video indeed. Great music too. Thanks.

    #3469435
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Loved it Chris and Ryan. Thanks. I am also impressed Chris that you composed the soundtrack. Good luck to you as you pursue such projects.

    #3465180
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon
    #2108343
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Hi David,

    Really nice photos. Hell's Canyon can be a nice place this time of year. I was on the Oregon side this past week for a couple of nights. I camped at Buckhorn Lookout and hiked down towards Eureka Bar. My weather was quite varied with sun, rain, sleet, hail, and snow.

    Thanks for taking the time to post your report,
    Rodney

    #2105938
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Tim,

    I did not see this product listed? When do you expect it to be available for sale?

    Rodney

    #2105937
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    For a two person tent I always go with one that is rated 3 person. The REI Quarter Dome T3 is tough to beat. If you are over six feet tall, you would want to go with a T3 Plus. The Marmot Limelight 3 is another good choice.

    Good Luck and enjoy.
    Rodney

    #2104976
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I love my GG Mariposa. It is a fantastic pack. But its limit to carry well without slipping and excessive weight on the shoulders is about 30 pounds. I love my ULA Circut. It is another excellent pack. But it also limits out around 35 or 37 lbs tops. So this year I went retro. I purchased a Kelty Super Tioga which is 5500 cubic inches and an external frame. I got it from Backcountry Edge for around $150. I've used it several times this winter with weights over 45 lbs and it handled well. I am very happy with it. However, for those doing mountaineering or bushwacking in dense forests, external frame packs have some drawbacks. The Gregory Baltoro 65 and 75 have received great reviews and rated as Best Buy from Outdoor Gear Labs. It is known for its great comfort and weight handling abilities. You might want to check it out.

    Good luck and good hiking.
    Rodney

    #2102155
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I have used trash compactor bags for many years and they have not failed me. I put my down sleeping bag and any clothes I will not use that day in the bag and roll it up like a long elephant trunk. However, this past year I was caught in an sudden winter storm with lots of rain and a couple of feet of snow. I made it out in two days but five PCT thru-hikers had to be rescued. This was in the north Cascades of Washington. My pack wetted out and all the contents in the bag that were not in the trash compactor got wet as well. I am guessing it added at least a pound to the overall weight. It was it miserable trying to dry out everything when the temps were in the mid 30's and no way to build a fire. I now have a waterproof pack cover for long expeditions in the shoulder seasons.

    Keep dry and good hiking.

    #2063624
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    John,

    Thanks for sharing a bit of your life with us. I am sure you realize how fortunate you are to have a wife who loves the backcountry. Have a great 2014.

    Rodney M

    #2063616
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    You know, Justin, I heard the same thing!

    #2053197
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Nice report and a wonderful introduction to this traverse. I may have missed it, but I did not see that total mileage or an approximation of the same. Let us know.

    Thanks again,
    Rodney

    #2051915
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Lachlan,

    I have owned this vest for four years. Like all other products I have purchased from Montbell, it is of high quality. I would not be afraid to wear it in town or wherever. Even though they use 10 denier fabric, it seems quite durable to me. If you poke it with a knife, it will puncture. But so will any other fabric.

    Hope this helps.
    Rodney

    #2048723
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I have a pair of MLD eVent mitts. The fabric is quite light and strong. But the seams are not waterproof. I tried sealing these seams and found it quite difficult. Thus, mine are no where near waterproof. Also know, because of the design and cut these are not form fitting. I was caught in an early snow storm / rain shower / blizzard where I need my MLD eVent mitts to be waterproof. They were not. I will not rely on them again to keep my hands anywhere near dry. Others may love them but not me. Now, I have several other MLD products and thing they are of the finest quality and materials. MLD is a great company but this product is not worth the $45 IMO.

    Rodney

    #2013686
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I am surprised no one has mentioned ViewRanger. I've tried most of the others and found this to be my favorite. For $24 I got the Neotreks/Accuterra maps and the USGS topo maps for the entire USA. They say it is a lifetime purchase. But when I looked at my renewal date, I realized my license was only good for 100 years! If I could only live so long.

    Because Gaia seems to be so well liked here, I checked it out a bit. It looks to have a good user interface and intuitive process. Now I am tempted to shell out another $10 on an app. I wish they had a 'trial' version.

    In any event, as of now I give the nod to ViewRanger.

    Rodney

    #2012106
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Two thoughts.

    1. The sales rep said the arc was to keep branches from getting caught. As pointed out, many other parts of the pack may prove to catch on branches. Therefore, it is a good possibility they used the arc form to eliminate two seams. This would save money.

    2. I think the external frame has been way underrated by the lightweight community. External frame packs have a lot of positive points. Up until now the number one downside of external frames was their relatively high weight. But now we have an option for an external frame pack at two pounds. I would love to try one out. The only problem is I would need to shell out $300 ! No way. And that is why I do not believe this pack will sell well.

    My two cents anyways.
    Rodney

    #2012103
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I have the Montbell Sprial Down #3 which is very similar to the Super Spiral. I love it. It is main bag. Being a big guy, I especially like the stretching ability. It also stays close to the body thereby eliminating air pockets. The nylon material is excellent in its water repelling.

    One caveat, if you look closely at the specs, the #3 is rated a 40 degree bag with 30 degree as the limit. I have used it below 30 degrees and been comfortable. But I learned the hard way what clothing I need to wear.

    I have used mine at least 100 nights with no loss of down, smell or wear. Well, my hiking partner, my yellow lab named Hunter, tore a hole in it using it as a play toy. He heard about my feelings and has never done that again! I still love him though.

    Good luck in your choice,
    Rodney

    #2011683
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Tyler,

    Nice review especially since this is your first.

    BPL has a reader gear review forum. You might want to post this review there as that forum will have a wider audience searching for just this sort of review.

    Great job. Let's see more like it.

    Rodney

    #2011633
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Nathan,

    My Samsung Galaxy S3 is GPS enabled. I use a program / app called ViewRanger. You can connect to their website at http://www.viewranger.com. I have used this for several months now and I am quite impressed. If you already have a smart phone you might want to check it out. The battery on the smart phone won't last forever, of course. So I purchased three spares on line for $8 each. They weigh 1.5 ounces each. With the original batteries and the three spares I can go at least eight days and probably could extend it up to 10 or 12 days.

    Just something to consider.

    Good luck and hiking,
    Rodney

    #2010707
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    A rain shell's level of waterproofing and breathability is a huge topic. There are as many opinions as there are backpackers. But I certainly understand your desires and need for a piece of gear that will last. During normal summer hiking in the western US where rain is infrequent, I carry a triple layer FroggToggs top and a rain skirt from ULA. When I go out in the shoulder seasons where it is cold and rain is much more frequent, I carry Marmot Precip jacket and pants. They are very durable. I wash it and replenish the DWR after a couple weeks of use. This helps. One nice feather of the Marmot PreCip rain gear is that it will not break the bank relative to other options like goretex and eVent.

    Now, the reality for me is when I exert a fair amount of energy, like I do when backpacking, the choice is wet from inside or wet from outside. I have never been able to afford eVent.

    Hope you enjoy your trip. It sounds great!

    Cheers,
    Rodney

    #2001618
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Ian,

    Thanks for the report. I too love the Blues especially the Wenehah-Tucannon Wilderness where you were. From Oregon Butte you can see forever. From you photos it looks like all the snow is gone.

    Thanks again,
    Rodney

    PS – You did a nice job with the video. When you are my age (59) and your son has a family of his own, you will watch this video having great memories.

    #1996815
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I agree back sweat happens to me on a hot day no matter what pack I have used.

    I have not used the GG Gorilla but I have the new Mariposa model which uses the same suspension system and materials etc. The closed cell foam sit pad I store there lies against my back. It is impermeable to water. I have had times where it has led to crack chaffing. But I stay on top of that with Body Glide or some similar application. However the pad keeps sweat from wetting out the pack material.

    I also agree with the others that using a long tail highly wicking shirt helps significantly. However, many short sleeve t shirts do not have a long tail.

    In the end, it is just one of those things backpackers need to get used to. As Mike McClelland says, "Don't complain. It does no good."

    Happy hiking even if sweaty.
    Rodney

    #1996811
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    I have been going over and over this topic in my mind lately. I finally got a smart phone for Christmas and have been exploring the options in this world. I have been very impressed by the available apps and maps. Once a person has the phone which many have anyway, the cost of 24k topo maps is next to nothing. I got the entire USA for 20 bucks. Now I do not need to buy each section at 9 bucks plus shipping. So saving on maps is one of the most desirable features for me.

    For battery backup I have 3 additional batteries at something like 1/2 ounce each. I figure with moderate usage 4 batteries total could last me 10 days which is most likely the longest leg on most trails.

    I understand the fear of breakage, loss or some other malfunction. However, loss of connectivity is no longer an issue. A smart phone has access to the GPS satellites wherever a person might want to go.

    I am going out the next few days with no paper maps, However, I am going into an area relatively familiar to me. So it is easier and safer than trying to do the John Muir Trail alone for the first time. In the final analysis, when I go out for long treks like I am doing in July in the Pasayten Wilderness, I'll take some paper maps as well.

    What really interested me is the the strong reaction of BPL members to the idea of not taking paper maps. I have not seen such a reaction for other proposals like using a 12 ounce quilt in the mountains with an 1/8" pad. Interesting.

    You all have great hikes this summer and lets keep helping one another.
    Rodney

    #1989008
    Rodney
    Spectator

    @rodney-m

    Locale: Northeast Oregon

    Ryan,

    Nice video. I look forward to the remainder.

    I would suggest you use gear that is currently available on the market. The benefit to viewers is diminished when you utilize gear that is no longer available. Your gear list includes several items no longer available like:

    500 ml Firelite pot
    Beartooth merino hoodie
    Thoroughfare pants

    You certainly can use them in your gear but it would be helpful to viewers for you to list a couple of similar products available today.

    Otherwise a great video and article.

    Thanks,
    Rodney

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 52 total)
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