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  • #1484247
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    @petesull

    First, for future reference, use a credit card–even when going through PayPal. There is an option to pay through PayPal with a credit card in PayPal.

    Second, report the incident through PayPal. Follow PayPal's instructions, don't miss any deadlines and you will get your money back. PayPal is very pro-buyer.

    I wouldn't resort to any intimidation tactics, but if PayPal doesn't refund your money, go through your local police station. Their call to the person explaining that they will be getting an arrest warrant may be enough.

    #1479068
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I don't think it'll work:

    1) Wool absorbs water; the polyester used on the outside of Paramo's jackets do not. In rain, the wool will stretch and become very wet and heavy. Unlike Paramo's polyester, which dries in minutes, your jacket would not dry for days.

    2) It won't be waterproof–at least not for long. The stretching of the fabric due to water absortion along with the weaker wool fiber unable to be as tightly woven as polyester will not sufficiently slow down the drops of rain. Paramo works by having the very tight outer weave stop/slow down the drops so that capillary depression on the inside layer is enough to stop the water. Water drops on the wool will fragment and likely continue through the wool with enough force to overcome the capillary action of the liner.

    3) It won't be windproof. The insider Paramo liner is not windproof and neither will be the wool.

    4) Abrasion. Wool is just not as tough as polyester. It will stretch and tear easily. This will make it less effective against rain or wind.

    #1473854
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    > Your description of the EPIC process is not entirely accurate.

    I tried to explain the process in the simplest manner; I didn't mean to suggest Nextec just stretches the fabric.

    > I think you need to substantiate this claim with some good facts and references.

    Nextec uses silicone which does not effectively transfer moisture. PU–in terms of water diffusion–is superior.

    > I have found EPIC fabrics perform very well in their chosen area, both in breathability and snow repellency.

    I agree. EPIC just doesn't test very well. Tests also don't show its durability and no need for reproofing. There's a reason why the U.S. military trusts EPIC for the protection of millions of soldiers.

    > Are you in any way affiliated with any company in the fabric arena?

    Nope. I'm a Paramo guy anyway–no need for coatings, laminates or encapsulation.

    #1473832
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    Like you guys have said, how much a fabric breathes is different in the lab and in the real world. When outdoors, the fastest way you'll transport moisture is moving air–which is why EPIC is a great outdoors fabric. I find a goretex or equivalent with a loose hem and pit zips open breathes better than a pertex windshirt because your body movement pushes and pulls outside air through the jacket.

    While I meant to harp on Nextec phrasing their process as superior "encapsulation," I didn't mean to say EPIC is a bad fabric. How breathable a piece of EPIC is depends on what process Nextec used and the fabric being coated; Nextec can impregnate a wider barrier in the fabric or next to none. From what I understand, the "Deluge" DWR that is in the popular and very breathable Patagonia Houdini–often regarded as the best combination of breathability and wind/water resistance–has next to no barrier and is very close to just encapsulated fibers. EPIC is also very durable and has a permanent DWR.

    A lot is personal preference as well. Many people here prefer their windshirts to have a PU kiss coat for extra wind and rain protection. A light EPIC is superior in every way–including breathability.

    #1473779
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    To say that EPIC isn't a coating is as close to false advertising as you can get. EPIC also uses a polymer that is not as breathable as many coatings and laminates. To make matters worse, the coating is inconsistent and not waterproof.

    To summarize in the simplest terms how EPIC is made, it is a coating applied to a piece of fabric in a unique way. A blade stretches the fabric as it runs along it and presses into the fabric a polymer. The polymer coats the threads and partially fills the interstices between the threads. Once the blade passes, the fabric snaps back. The snapping back causes the polymer to partially or completely fill the interstices between the threads. Really the only difference between a coating and "encapsulation" is the viscosity of the polymer and the stretching of the fabric.

    Now the theory is that some interstices will be left partially unfilled, allowing the fabric to breathe–because honestly, the polymer Nextec uses is inferior to even the cheapest coatings. However, all you have for the fabric to breathe are these partially open holes which may be nearly full. The polymer, which essentially creates a barrier, is not going to breathe. This barrier is also very thin and will not stand up to nominal water pressure.

    The problem is you have a thin barrier that doesn't breathe and doesn't stop water. The small holes account for such a small percentage of surface area that it won't breathe well.

    #1472829
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    The best windshirt is the Paramo Fuera Smock. Once you use a wired, roll-away hood, you will never buy a shell without it. The high collar that can zip up over your chin is great.

    The fabric, unlike similar Patagonia, Marmot, etc., is not calendered and does not have any coating. It is a simple, tight weave. It has the best drape of any of the fabrics used in windshirts as well and minimizes noise.

    #1463815
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    Really? I tried on a 190 Tshirt and it fit like a regular Tshirt would. The 150 and 200 are bodyfit baselayers, known for their tight fits.

    #1463778
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    Ha no not just one icebreaker. I'll be ordering various midlayers weights, but for a baselayer I wanted just a couple. Really, I'm wondering if there is much of a difference in comfort between 150 and 200; both are listed as year round use.

    #1462492
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    If you're ever going to try Paramo, now is the time. I was looking to try it last year but a 2.1 – 2.2 exchange rate with the dollar meant £150 = $300+. With the exchange rate dropping under 1.5:1 at times, £150 is $225. If you want to save more, find the online sites that don't charge VAT (15%+ tax!) to customers in the U.S.

    Question: you said the Aspira smock was short–it looks like a long jacket in your photo. How much longer is the Aspira jacket than the smock?

    If you like the fabric, also check out:

    http://www.cioch-direct.co.uk – they use the Paramo fabric in custom made jackets. They are very helpful and I've heard great things about their customer support. I've been eying the Glamaig for a while. A lot of tall, athletic builds on this site complain a lot about sizing–this is the place to go.

    http://www.furtech.co.uk – fabric that works just like Paramo. In addition, great customer service and very helpful. New pants this year got great reviews at http://www.outdoorsmagic.com. Make sure to check the sizing info before ordering!

    http://www.finisterreuk.com – again, great guys that will help and answer every question you have. By far the best looking Paramo jackets. The Storm Track is pretty much perfection if you have the dough to spend. Now that they have XXL, my 6'4 frame will fit (sizing is slimmer than regular)

    #1451186
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    First, make sure to rinse very well after washing the jacket. Soap will create conduits for water to quickly soak through.

    Second, while EPIC is a good fabric, it is inconsistent. The fabric is heated and stretched while a viscous polymer is pressed into it, then the fabric is released. When released, the excess polymer fills in the interstices of the fibers. While Nextec does a great job to keep the amount of polymer consistent, it nevertheless is almost random how much will fill each interstice. If you look at cross sections under a microscope, some will be filled completely while others only partially. It basically creates a very light barrier (less than 1,000 mmH2O resistance, generally), but may have spots where it's less (100 – 200mmH20). A raindrop falling at moderate speeds will be able to break areas of an EPIC jacket.

    While some swear by the fabric for light rain, I dislike it. It creates a barrier that drastically reduces breathability yet doesn't stop moderate rain. The trade off for me is not worth it. Those who love the Patagonia Houdini will disagree with me, as the Patagonia Deluge DWR is EPIC (maybe a thinner EPIC? I'm not sure).

    #1445877
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    It has a light PU coating on the inside. While this is great for the light rain, it does inhibit breathability. Other than that, the jacket was great.

    #1443865
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    Can't post my big post.

    #1443863
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I can't seem to post in parts my big post explaining in detail how the fabrics work. Hit me up with an message if you're still interested.

    The short answer: like dog hair.

    #1440527
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    6'4 205 pounds here, long arms (at least 36").

    Pretty much anything you find that fits in the sleeves you'll be swimming in. Unfortunately, "slim" or "athletic" fit usually means shorter length wise in the torso and can be a problem. I usually find clothing that has a good waist cinch that I can hide.

    Cloudveil fits me. Their clothes are usually very large, but great sleeve length. (XL)

    I just got a Patagonia Rain Shadow, and I'm very impressed. It fits well, although like usual, I need to tighten the waist. (XL)

    I found Marmot a bit short in the sleeves on a couple Spring items. Montbell may be just right, I've had a Polyester base layer from them and tried on a softshell, seemed to fit just right in the sleeves, little less "swimming" as compared to Cloudveil and Patagonia.

    #1431477
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I emailed Integral Designs and they said they can't make pit zips

    #1430439
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    Doug: the first thing I did was check BPL for reviews. The review is very helpful.

    What do you think about the side vents? Do they they create good airflow with movement? When open, are they letting water in?

    #1430417
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I did see the Quickfire. It is very similar to what I'm looking for. I'm wondering how well the pockets vent without letting in water.

    #1429617
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    If the rain is coming down hard, you really can't unzip the front. So, anytime you're moderately exerting yourself and it's raining, you need pit zips. For a lot of terrain and backpackers, this means anytime it's raining, you can't use the front zip.

    The advantages of pit zips are seen even when there is no wind to circulate air. Your own body movement pushes and sucks air in and out, as long as there are sufficient inputs and outputs. The colder air outside your jacket will cool the inside, making you sweat less and–most importantly–lowering the amount of moisture the air inside can hold by 10 – 30% immediately. If there is significant wind, pit zips shine as the wind will replace the warm air on the inside and carry away the moisture at a rate hundreds the time of that of the fabric.

    #1429502
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I completely agree with Tom. I cannot believe when companies like eVent and Paramo say "it's so breathable you don't need pit zips!" I don't even sweat much and find any aerobic activity will overwhelm my pertex windshirt.

    A light eVent, around 10oz, with pit zips, would completely replace windshirts and save everyone (that can afford it) 3 – 6oz.

    #1429311
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    What about the lightest eVent jacket with ventilation (pit or side zips) and an electronics port/pocket?

    #1425345
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    When I run, I find a light waterproof (HyVent, Goretex, Event, etc.) with chest unzipped a bit, pit zips open and hem loosened provides about the same or better breathability than a windshirt without pit zips. The pit zips allow good airflow from the chest or hem.

    #1424384
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    North Face really cleared out a lot of their repetitive, fashion jackets this Spring. It looks like they are focused a bit more on making efficient products rather than designs they can slap a North Face emblem on…perhaps remembering what got them to where they are.

    #1423624
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I don't think the Houdini or the Ready Mix from Patagonia are encapsulated fibers like Epic.

    #1423075
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I'll see what I can do re: weight information. I don't have a scale though; where can I pick up a cheap one?

    #1422909
    P S
    Member

    @petesull

    I messed around with one today at The North Face store. It's pretty incredible–it's lighter than my windshirt. I really like how big and high the collar is. The hood forms a nice close seal around your head. In fact, I had to put the hood on before zipping up the jacket all the way, or I'd have to tug the hood over my head. It's minimalist in every way: the hem is controlled by one tightener on the right side. It didn't look odd or uneven when I pulled it tight. It seems normal North Face size, which is slightly small on me, but then again I'm almost 6'5, 210 with broad shoulders and very long arms (size XL). It also looks stylish (they only had black), and the white online with green zippers looks tempting for a spring/summer/fall everything jacket.

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