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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 33 total)
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  • #1962213
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Thanks for a great review! What size does the whole thing pack down to?

    #1548060
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Thanks to the judges for their kind remarks and apt criticism! Considering the entries, I feel very lucky!

    Thanks again!

    #1452495
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Nice work! Couple questions:

    How did you make the chimney holes in the beer cans so they fit so well?
    Could you use a similar system but make it into a wood burner (for example, extend the chimney down a bit so it becomes a stand, add ventilation holes and a wire mesh screen, and then throw in your tinder and light?)?

    Thanks for sharing!

    #1451343
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Is the colored cuben still the same weight? And are they 60" wide rolls?

    I know this may be a silly question, but Bill, do you recommend cuben for quilts (now that you've had your cuben sleeping bag for a while)? I worry about having a VB quilt, but would be excited to make something so lightweight.

    Maybe colored cuben is the push I needed to finally make a complete SUL kit. Still have to come up with the funds though :(

    #1451050
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Have you looked at Ray Jardine's bomber hat? Check it out at http://www.rayjardine.com

    #1450561
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    "Grip Clips!" Precisely. Thanks Todd.

    They'll be better than sewing in a pullout, imo.

    #1450439
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I can't remember what they are called or where you find them, but there is a product that works just like the pebble method. It's two pieces of plastic that lock together with the fabric between them, providing a stable tie out point anywhere you want. I have four of them on my tarp to lift up the roof and they work really well.

    Someone who knows what I'm talking about can point you at where to buy them. But it sounds like what you're looking for.

    #1450310
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I've never seen this before. How well does it reduce boiling times? Does tinfoil deform?

    #1450234
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    It's true. But a man can never have too many briefs. Besides, there's always t-shirts, long sleeved shirts, long underwear, pillow covers, curtains, decorative pot covers, and what not.

    #1450230
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    LOL!!!

    I would love to get some of this fabric, but probably don't need too much. If someone wants to go in together with me we could get the wholesale price and split the order. Let me know.

    #1450145
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Hey Mark,

    Thanks for the review. What was your ratio of ethanol to isopropyl?

    Just out of curiosity too, how did you keep it protected when packing it without the clear container?

    Cheers,
    Casey

    #1420770
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I've been doing my best to try and follow this thread, but a lot of it is over my head. So I have a quick question that might help me understand something.

    When you make charcloth you burn the cloth inside a sealed container, except for some sort of vent hole (in this example, I'm thinking of using an alcohol stove to heat the container). When The cloth starts to combust (?) you get a lot of smoke coming out of the vent hole. Ever so often that smoke will ignite and fire like the jet of an alcohol stove without having been exposed to any direct flame. I always assumed that that smoke was getting so hot that it hit its ignition point and burst into flame as soon as it got enough oxygen. Is that true? Is that what some folks are saying is happening with the preheated air in the double wall designs?

    In any case, I'm inspired to try and make a wood burning stove now. Now I just have to figure out (1) which type of stove I should be making and (2) how in the world to make it.

    #1420669
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Will there end up being trapped moisture between the layers from rain and such?

    #1420569
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Yes instant versions are fine. And I completely agree with you about the anti-UL elements of this method.

    If I can make an argument for it, I can use a slightly different method for the food plan for this project. How would you do it if you couldn't use menu planning?

    Thanks for your comment!

    #1415994
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    That's great, they look really good. I'm officially inspired. The changes you made to your pattern are really helpful.

    Thanks again!

    #1415910
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Lol. Thanks for he advice. I plan on just sewing through both pieces for the baffles. The two things that I'm most worried about is predicting the fit, and measuring the down.

    I ordered the down from Ed Speer, so the project is a go. I have a pants pattern that I made up and am tweaking in the mean time for fit. Do you think that if the pants fit loosely all around, and are a bit long they'll fit fine when stuffed?

    Thanks for all the help!

    #1414997
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I agree! It'd be really nice to have an index of DIY stuff (e.g. all threads dealing with shelters, packs, x, y, z…). That way, when new folks like myself want to come through and see what's already been discussed, it'd be readily available.

    #1412549
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Yeah, Jason's tutorial is exactly what I used to make my asym hammock in the pictures above. It's an awesome resource!

    Here's another link that discusses a different whipping technique for asym hammocks, if you decide to go that route: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1846

    #1412515
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I've never made anything with down. How do you know how much you will need for a particular project?

    #1412180
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Really excellent job! I'd definitely be interested in your pattern and tips if you feel like sharing!

    Nice Job!

    #1411859
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Here's a link to a good whipping tutorial for an asym hammock:

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1846

    #1411669
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Hey Miguel,

    I don't think I understand what you mean about the walls squeezing in. With the spreader bar in place the walls are held apart and can't squeeze in.

    As for keeping the hammock from flipping I did a couple things. I made a bottom entry just like Hennessy hammocks use, and having the sides of the hammock staked to the ground (albeit with stretchy cord). With these two things in place I've never had a problem with tipping, or even coming close to tipping.

    For the spreader bar pockets I used ballistic nylon and made them specifically for my poles. One end fits the handle, the other fits the tip. And I sewed one side of the pocket to the hammock, and the other side to the bug netting.

    I had a fair amount of trouble with the bug netting too. There are no patterns that I know about for getting it to work, so I just set the hammock up and draped the netting over and pinned it in place. The end result was really nice. And it isn't a mirror of the hammock. It is significantly narrower.

    #1411601
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I've made lots of hammocks, so I'll chime in here. The ultimate goal for me is to be able to lay flat. The two best designs that I've seen for accomplishing this is the bridge hammock and the asymmetrical design. I feel too cramped in a bridge hammock, so I like the asym.

    Really, the absolute most key thing (in my experience) is getting the gathering right at the ends. I start with a large rectangle (longer than you'd think), mark the tie out points (asym), gather the ends (you can optionally sew the two edges of the ends together here for several inches), place a length of cord in the middle of the gather at each end for the ridgeline tie out points, and then whip the ends together.

    As for the gathering, some people like to just halfhazzardly collect all the fabric and whip it together. I like to make very meticulous folds (each successive fold bringing the outside edges to the center point). If your gather is off, you'll end up with really awkward tension lines.

    I like to make the ridgeline adjustable so I can set the amount of sag I want on the fly. I do this with a taughtline hitch.

    But now for the ultimate secret! On my asym hammocks I put pockets for a spreader bar (for which is use my trekking poles). This makes the hammock way more livable, and reduces any of those awkward tension lines you might have from construction.

    Here are some pictures:

    I know that's a lot of vague information, but I hope it helps.

    #1411600
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    I don't think you're missing anything. It doesn't support amazingly well, but it is very comfortable. But, if you've got enough clothing to stuff, you might as well do that.

    #1411584
    Casey Cardwell
    BPL Member

    @niles

    Locale: On the Dirt in Oregon

    Unfortunately I've only got one. The diameter looks to be about 2". I like the fuel bottle idea. I'm still looking for the perfect alcohol stove too, though.

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