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Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 189 total)
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  • #1971272
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    I happily grab my little Panasonic FT3 (TS3 in US) waterproof point-and-shoot for most backpacking, packrafting and bikepacking trips. It swings from my hand or sits in a pocket, always ready to use in an instant while my GH2 has to be lugged around in a separate waterproof, padded bag. "The best camera is the one you have with you" and for outdoor trips that to me means the camera that's in my hand or pocket, not cosseted deep in my pack from the elements :)

    How good the image quality has to be comes down to your aspirations. Me, I just want some images to help jolt my memories on occasion or share some impressions of my trips with my friends. If you're looking for commercial quality then there are obviously other, more expensive options.

    #1970473
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    No, never had an issue with the taper or bunching on my MLD Spirit 30 quilt. It works perfectly when flattened out or cinched up tight.

    #1941413
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    My decision to use the synthetic over-quilt system linked to in the article above was based on the following article from some-time BPL contributor Jörgen Johansson:

    http://www.fjaderlatt.se/2010/04/across-sarek-in-winter-sleep-system.html

    We then completed a somewhat 'adventurous' six day ski tour of the Finnmarksvidda mountain plateau in northern Norway, including Arctic storms, falling in a river and near-death slides. Our sleeping system was the least of our worries ;)

    #1941357
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    @Robert,

    The synthetic quilts ability to cope with moisture better than down was the theory behind me using this system. It seems to work very well. My down bag stayed dry and lofted over a six day ski tour, except near my mouth where moisture from my breath condensed. There was a small build up of moisture inside the very outer layer of the quilt where I presume any moisture my body was giving off was condensing. It was easy to dry the thin synthetic quilt on the sunny days towards the end of the trip.

    #1941144
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    I've been using a 'shoulder season' down bag AND a synthetic summer quilt in winter for a couple of years with some success:

    http://thunderinthenight.blogspot.no/2011/04/thunder-on-tundra-gear-sleep-system.html

    Two items cover most situations that I will find myself camping in.

    #1937860
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Check this series of articles from BPL for everything to do with winter footwear:

    https://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/lightweight_footwear_systems_for_snow_travel_part_1.html

    Links to Parts II and III contained within.

    #1936518
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Great review and superb use of the video medium. A glimpse into the future of BPL gear reviews?

    #1936358
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway
    #1929594
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Andy Kirkpatrick with some salient advice on gloves and climbing:

    http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/the_truth_about_gloves

    "You can buy 100% waterproof gloves, but no matter how expensive they are, all of them have one major flaw in their drop-lined, seam-sealed and die-cut design… they all have a dammed great dirty hole in them that lets the rain in. Where you may ask? It’s the one into which you’ve got to stick your hand."

    #1927325
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Suunto +1

    Bomber.

    #1924806
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Re: Tom: "I'm not sure if the recent BPL winter article answers my concern either"

    Actually I thought Dave linked to two excellent resources on the subject in his line:

    "My article on shoulder season footwear will be suitable for mild winter conditions, while Rietveld and Reichl’s series covers colder temperatures."

    Dave's excellent article on 'shoulder season' footwear is here:

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/fast_light_shoulder_season_footwear_tips.html

    And Will and Janet's comprehensive 3-part article on winter footwear systems can be found at:

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/lightweight_footwear_systems_for_snow_travel_part_1.html

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/lightweight_footwear_systems_for_snow_travel_part_2.html

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/lightweight_footwear_systems_for_snow_travel_part_3.html

    They are all excellent, in-depth articles gained from a lot of experience and experimentation. The solution for warmer winter hiking feet lies within!

    #1919758
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Great photos, nice fish and interesting gear list. Thanks for sharing this Ryan.

    #1876122
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    I've been using my FT3 for a couple of months now but not coming from a 'photography' background you will have to excuse my lack of knowledge when it comes to the technical aspects. I bought it as a replacement for my other Panny point-and-shoot, the TZ4. With a packraft I wanted something waterproof but also I wanted something I could take out and shoot pictures when it was pouring with rain without worrying about it. The FT3 also appealed to me as it could shoot full HD movies.

    Yes, the GPS function can be switched off. I've never used it.

    On battery life: My trip at the weekend was a 24 hour packrafting trip. I shot 40mins of HD video and a couple of dozen stills and the battery died on the bus home while chimping my weekend's footage! I have ordered two spare batteries.

    Picture quality? I'm in no way competent enough to comment beyond my observation that the tiny lens obviously makes shooting in low light less desirable but also that I am so far happy with the results that this tiny, tough point-and-shoot produces. I'm just about to buy a GH2 to expand my photo and video horizons but the ruggedness and simplicity of the FT3 means it wil still find it's way on many trips, especially where packrafts and rain are involved (which is a lot in western Norway…)

    Those interested in the photos I have shot on the FT3 can look here: http://thunderinthenight.blogspot.com/

    And here: https://picasaweb.google.com/112307819916350072414/ThunderInTheNightIV

    Those who want to see video shot on the FT3 can look here: https://vimeo.com/39860619

    And here: https://vimeo.com/41791592

    #1867383
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    I have used the larger GoLite Quest as a packraft hauling pack. I ran it first with the stays and plastic framesheet in place but eventually removed the stays and found the pack to be way more comfortable while still resulting in support that resists the folding or buckling of the pack body that happens when loading the frameless Pinnacle.

    Simple answer would be to try it on an overnighter closer to home in the different configurations and see what works best for you.

    #1865607
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Talking of stopping to build a fire, wasn't the skills and techniques required to start a warming fire in sh*tty conditions one of the articles you were going to write (either for your blog or here) in the future? :)

    I know I would find such an article interesting and useful, especially when contemplating trying to replicate trips similar in scope to this one.

    #1865331
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Do you carry sleep socks Dave on such a trip or only on longer ones?

    Would boater pants and a semi-dry top offer enough protection to leave the drysuit and Ozo at home? Kokatat do a nice Gore-Tex pullover with neoprene neck and wrist gaskets. Has a hood too.

    #1864916
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Great video Nick. Got a really nice vibe to it.

    Way to go and dispel my preconceptions of what hiking in Australia might entail!

    #1864627
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Kiyoshi,

    Your wishes for the new Gorilla have been granted! Phil Turner, a Gossamer Gear Trail Ambassador based in Scotland is testing one right now. Look for it to be released to the public soon.

    #1853611
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Damien,

    The fit on the Paramo jackets is what lets them down for me. The sleeves could do with being an inch or so longer and there is quite a bit of 'flappage' in the arm and body, although this does allow for a belly pack or storing gas canisters in the pockets, ideal for winter touring.

    As others have done, having Cioch make you a custom fitted jacket from the Paramo fabrics is the real deal.

    Paramo is a 'winter only' option for me. The double layer of material is just too warm over about 35C. Ski touring it shines, replacing a mid-layer and windshirt which gives you a very simple, no-fussing shell layer. Cleaning/reproofing regularly is required.

    #1850048
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Tjaard,

    Yup, Cioch will be my next call when replacing the Vista.

    #1849987
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    "There are so many truly great windshirts available that selection can come down to preference in fit and features" – and colour! ;)

    Another thing I have discovered is that one company's definition of size can change from year to year. My Montane Litespeed is a Medium and is 3 years old (this thing just can't be killed off by conventional means). My Montane Krypton softshell from last winter was originally purchased in a Large (to act as the outer shell in a two soft-shell system) but I found it too small and ended up with an XL. A discussion with the company revealed that the current designer had shifted the sizing parameters slightly.

    I'll echo the sentiments here that the 'Euro' brands appear to have a different cut on the whole. Rab, Montane, Haglofs, Norrøna and others all combine good fabrics with great tailoring. Long arms, long torsos and no excess flappage FTW.

    Paramo on the other hand. Wonderful fabric, shocking cut…

    #1835328
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway
    #1831145
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    The sleeves on my Medium MEC have more room than the sleeves on my other Medium sized Rab tops with a comparable fit (i.e. slim or form fitting)

    #1830347
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway
    #1829533
    joe newton
    BPL Member

    @holdfast

    Locale: Bergen, Norway

    Just to confuse matters more there are the MEC and Rab versions of the 'Polartec Power Dry hoody' too.

    MEC T3 Stretch Hoody:

    http://www.mec.ca/AST/ShopMEC/MensClothing/BaseLayerUnderwear/ExpeditionWeight/PRD~5016-259/mec-t3-stretch-hoodie-mens.jsp

    Rab Baseline Hoody:

    http://rab.uk.com/products/mens-clothing/baselayer/baseline-hoodie.html

    I believe there could be at least three different 'weights' of Power Dry. Certainly my Rab Power Dry liner gloves are very thin compared to my MEC hoody although both feature the same micro grid construction and dry quickly.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 189 total)
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