Forum Replies Created

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 69 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1505521
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I'm interested too and would gladly submit some trip reports throughout the summer. Fly Fishing is one of my main back country pursuits. I keep a lake log so I can remember what worked best last time.trout

    #1490025
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I got mine a couple days ago. It's a small and weights 8.9 oz on my scale. I like what I see so far.

    It works great in my Big Agness 5.4 oz SL Cyclone Chair Kit!! I like it much better than the BA Clearview Air Pad (11 oz) I've been using. It weights less and fits better. The material is nicer too.

    #1487432
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I'd head into the Kalmiopsis Wilderness in the Siskiyou Nat Forest. Maps available at GP ranger station. Big, wild, empty. Fire about 5 years ago has made some unusual terrain even weirder.camp
    I'd go in the Chetco Pass route. There will be snow on the rim, so you can't get to Babyfoot Trailhead by car. Be ready for some snow hiking in any case.

    #1487428
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Another over 50 Aarn Natural Balance lover here. We'll be seeing more of this front balance concept.

    The future of backpacking IMHO.

    #1485237
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    1. No Hydration Sleeve

    2. Keep the shoulder strap pockets

    3. Keep all three outside mesh pockets

    4. Prefer a flap, partly because it can help move the weight toward the body when cinched down.

    Now the big questions: fit.

    5. long torsos where the hip belt crosses your iliac crest

    6. Provide "load lifter straps"

    #1485235
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I like the possum down socks available here at BPL. No good for using in boots or shoes, but wonderful for sleeping. I carry down booties for really cold nights and use them over the possum down.

    #1467940
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Looks like the lengths are included in the little diagrams on the left of the size chart. On the stuff sack it looks like a typo, since the grams are the same on the med and large, maybe the large should read .8 oz too. Confusing for sure.

    #1466530
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    1. Beartooth Merino Hoody – nice job BPL

    2. Petzl E+Lite Headlamp – replaces my old Tikka

    3. Big Agnes Clearview Air Pad & Cyclone SL Chair Kit – Luxury I can live with

    #1441636
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I sleep under the stars about 60 nights a season. Backpacking trips are usually 5 or 6 nights each.

    #1440798
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    My experience with this filter was frustrating.

    I purchased one of these at my local outdoor store. After studying the directions and test cleaning at home it went with me on a 6 day trip into the wilderness. After this one trip I returned it.

    This unit is very fussy to clean. They recommend cleaning after every 8 liters pumped or about once a day. You can't tell if it's dirty or clean, because you can't see the element. It breaks if dropped or frozen, but it's very hard to tell if it's broken. There's a bubble test and a compression test to check for breakage. But no apparent signs.

    I dropped by my local store today and my salesman had talked with his MSR rep. They told him that many people are getting an airlock when cleaning the filter. This can happen if you pump it at the wrong time while reassembling the fussy little pieces to create a back wash. And here's the really bad thing. Once you have an airlock the element is ruined and must be replaced! This is the first I'd heard of this. The rep said MSR was replacing the elements of airlocked filters for free. hmmmm.

    When I bought mine, I attempted to get a replacement element to carry in case I broke the first one and I could not find replacement elements anywhere locally or on the net.

    I would not recommend this filter for field use. Too fussy to clean. Can't tell if it's broken. Cleaning can create an irreversible airlock. One other thing, you must use filtered water to clean it.

    #1424392
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Good points Josh, using wood with the TT would make sense, and using the esbit as backup.

    I already carry enough Ti stakes, so that saves another 0.6 oz. So I would save around 4 oz and perhaps lose some speed.

    I'm thinking I should give the TT system a go. Although, I've loved my Ti Zip…

    #1424321
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I use a Sierra Zip Stove. I was just about convinced to try the CC as a lighter alternative. But I did the math for (2) people for (6) days. Figuring (4) 14 gram esbits per day.

    Vargo .9 L 4.0 oz
    Caldera Cone 1.2 oz
    Gram Cracker 0.2 oz
    (24) Esbit 11.8 oz
    Total 17.2 oz

    Litech Kettle 5.5 oz
    Titanium Zip 10.4 oz includes battery (0.5)
    Total 15.9 oz

    Plus I have unlimited fuel. It can be harder to find dry fuel in wet weather. But, I've always managed.

    Just another option to consider.

    #1422506
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Thanks so much! Great research.

    #1361096
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I have a Gossamer Gear SpinnTwinn Tarp.
    It’s about 9’x8′ and weighs under 9 oz with cords attached. It’s an irregular shape and works well over my Clark Jungle Hammock. I carry a bigger homemade Rayway Cave 2 (9’x10′) when I expect lots of rain. It’s about 20 oz with cords.

    The GG tarp is just barely big enough in blowing rain. I sometimes cover my hammock ends with a trash bag or grocery bag. At night sometimes I use my rain jacket over the foot end which gets the least coverage from the tarp. I find the gg tarp to be a good light weight alternative for the occasional thunder shower or for the committed light weighter. Like I said I take something bigger if I’m expecting to spend much time in the shelter area.

    #1361095
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    You really captured the place. What a great way to spend the night. Thanks for posting.

    #1359472
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Hi Jean and Sue,
    Thanks for writing this article. I’m a older women living and backpacking in Southern Oregon too. My story is quite similar to yours. I’m a little younger (55) and my base weight is a little heavier (22), but our paths are much alike. I’ve gone the hammock route and have not yet given up my jetboil or my water purifier.
    If you would ever like to get together for a gear pow wow let me know. I run a landscaping business, Carol’s Colors, so you can reach me there or my email is ccorbridge4 at msn dot com

    #1358850
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I always take a loaf of Fougase made by a local bakery. It’s full of olive oil and spices and very hard and chewy. It has held up fine stuffed into a pack for a week with no special packaging or treatment. Just a ziplock.

    High calorie for a bread and satisfying to tear into with some Turkey Jerky from Costco.

    #1358848
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I’ve tryed many of her dishes and use them often. I like Red Pesto Pasta, Alfredo Pasta, Santa Fe Pasta, Black Bean Corn Chowder, Lentil Pilav, Lentil Bisque.

    I add brewers yeast to some cayenne pepper to others.

    #1358422
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Richard,

    I have that type of valve on my full length Exped Mat. And it did take me awhile to catch on to it. So it’s good you posted this here. But, the (2) 3/4 length pads that I have have a different smaller valve that doesn’t have that preliminary stop. IMHO the problem with these pads is not the valve. I have actually found a few small, very small leaks in the fabric, which I repaired.

    The exped full length mat does not leak, by the way. It has a little different fabric too. Maybe they’re fixed the problem by changing their fabric??? But, then I almost never use it because it’s so heavy.

    #1358400
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I have (2) of these. The Exped’s have an R-value of 4.9. So they are warm. Equal in warmth to the Stephenson Dam even though they’re a little less in thickness. More down I would guess, since they weigh about the same but are narrower. But, I’ve had the slow air leak problem with them that other people have reported as well. This is where at about 3 in the morning you are on a flat pad. Finding said leak is a major pain. Best way I’ve found is soapy water, like looking for a gas leak.

    I sent the original (2) I bought back and received a replaces free of charge from Exped. These current ones are the replacements. I’m not sure if I damaged them or if they came with the leaks. They always seemed to leak a little. But, I was never sure if it was the temps dropping or a leak causing the minor deflation. But, it has slowly gotten worse and worse.
    I’ve repaired the leaks I could identify, but I just don’t trust them anymore. 3 am is a bad time to get up and mess around with a pump that was your pillow.

    I’m not inclined to send these back although I take excellent care of my gear and don’t really feel I am at fault.

    My advice, if you get one of these is to test it really well before you take it on the trail. Inflate it and sleep on it all night, preferably outside, where the temps will drop and it will deflate some from that as well. Determine for yourself if the pad is leaking from the git go. So you can return it, confident that it came to you defective.

    These are really slow leaks that don’t even show up under water, unless you apply quite a bit of pressure. But, they do show up over night.

    Other than this problem the Expeds have been great. Comfortable, warm, compress down well.

    So far the Stephenson has been fine. No leaks, no problems. The guy who makes them was friendly and tried to talk me out of my custom size. He’s not an ultra light fan. But I persisted and he sent me the custom one.

    I found the website offputting at first. Not because of the nudity. I didn’t care one way or the other about that, but because the info was so scattered. But, I heard good things about the products and found I wanted something custom, so it was the only game in town, as they say.

    Looks like he measured and cut it himself. You can see the measuring marks on it still. Fine by me. I’m into the function not the looks of the thing. definately not mass produced.

    I’ve only used it a handful of times, so we’ll see how it holds up. I’m impressed so far. And looking forward to having a floaty for the mountain lakes this summer.

    #1358346
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    You may want to consider the Stephensons Warmlite DAM.

    http://www.warmlite.com/bags.htm

    Website is a little confusing, but product is solid. It is bright yellow though.

    I had a custom one made. It has 3″ loft and is 28″ x 47″ weighs 17 oz plus pump sack 2.8 = close to 20 oz. I use it in a hammock with my pack under my legs. It is really warm!!

    When it’s warmer at night I use an Insulmat Max Thermo 3/4

    http://www.rei.com/product/48003475.htm

    REI says 15 oz, but mine weighs more like 16, still pretty light. No pump sack needed.

    Both of these pads can be used as flotation devices. Fun for paddling around the mountain lakes.

    #1358204
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    Light, comfortable, durable, stays clean, waterproof, nice BIG pockets that double as vents. Only quibble is the waterproof zippers are stiff.

    #1358202
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I use a thermarest-lite-seat. a little over 3 oz. It’s easy to deploy, useful for many situations.

    #1358187
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I just bought some airwalks at Payless shoes for $20 that weigh in at about 10 oz and will work for me as camp shoes and water shoes.

    Check them out at:

    http://www.payless.com/Catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?&TLC=Mens&Size=7Regular&SLC=MensSandals&BLC=MensSandalsBeach&ItemCode=54069&DescriptiveColor=Black&Width=Regular&Type=Adult&VTLC=&LotNumber=045233&cm_id=sizedropmenu

    #1357467
    Carol Corbridge
    Spectator

    @ccorbridge

    Locale: Southern Oregon

    I don’t think WM does custom work, but I’m not sure. The overfilled bag is available as far as I know only from Hermit’s Hut online. I think they have a large batch of these done for them by WM, but I don’t think WM does single special orders.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 69 total)
Loading...