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  • #3760646
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    It’s been determined by the NPS and others that bear cans are far more effective at keeping bears away from food than hangs. Far more. I hung my food for a couple of decades in the Sierra. I was very good at it. But…one time while tending a small fire in the rain I was distracted for a moment and cub made off with my food bag. Another time, there was no ideal hang, I was very tired, it was dark, and a bear simply broke off the sturdy branch I was using. I short, user error is more likely with a hang. I would chat with hikers who lost there hangs fairly frequently. Bears in the Sierra are (were?) extremely smart about getting hung food. That’s becoming a lost art for bears.

    I understand that Mt. is not the Sierra. Or Alaska. I’ve seen hangs in the PNW that made me laugh out loud. A Sierra bear would have them in five seconds flat. They seem to work though. My guess is that they’ll stop working over time.

    #3760633
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “I think leaving food on the ground is irresponsible when not necessary.”

    and when hiking in Alaska, or in alpine regions, or even on trail in the PNW, you’re going to hang your food effectively…where now?

    Or do you really thing that getting your food “off the ground” will keep it from bears, who after all, can climb trees?

    In the Sierra, where I hike, the very smart bears have given up on messing with canisters. sure, theoretically, a bear ‘could’ eventually crack open a bear canister. Over a week it could also break into a concrete bunker. But they don’t.

    #3760500
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I’m afraid the “just be prepared for it to rain a bit every day” quote really misrepresents the reality. It’s not like things will clear up every other day. It’s most often gray, and then rains, then remains gray, then rains…for months. When I was living there–first 22 years of life–Seattle was the suicide capital of the U.S.

    S.A.D. is real. But, lots of folks can deal with the weather. I’d move back to Bellingham before moving to Austin, say. But an old girlfriend from the Bellingham days, who lives in Austin, would never move back. Her brother still lives there and she feels gloomy when visiting him. I’d die in Austin, as much as I like the city.

    #3760421
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Allright! An actual Big Agnes tent user!

     

    I’m a rebel. Always have been. bad to the bone. Bone dry, in that tent. that said, I moved on in later years.

    #3760411
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I used Big Agnes tents for years. I was in a lot of torrential downpours, and some monsoonal storms that lasted off and on for several days and nights. Including being directly under thunderstorms at high altitude with little or no cover. With the Fly Creek Ul 1 I never had a leak. Actually, that’s always what I liked most about it. Bombproof. So….

    #3760364
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I’m with Craig on this. Speaking for myself, route finding is not my forte. It’s reassuring to see a duck on tricky terrain. I don’t go out to feel anxious about being lost. I don’t carry gps or a phone. I usually hike solo. Knowing that others have made the same route decisions as me is a good thing. It’s the equivalent of turning to a partner and asking if they think we’re on the right route. Confirmation.

    #3760326
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Todd, that’s true and I entirely respect that. A duck is a sign. Humans make signs. Goats don’t. (Well, other than their poop.) We know that a human has been there when a duck is visible.

    Hmm, we bury our poop and make ducks; goats leave their poop and knock over our ducks.

    Pintails chuckle in the reeds.

     

    #3760323
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    In the Sierra, one tends to find ducks on long barren granite expanses of boulders and scree. The biome, such as it is, isn’t affected by these. Or anyway, a goat passing by, or a snow slide, will have as much or more of an effect. I’m all for lNT and all the rest. That said, the wilderness isn’t a glass case housing delicate treasures. I don’t carve on trees; bears do.

    C0ntext is everything, as was mentioned above.

    #3760315
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I lived in Bellingham for two years and grew up in Kirkland, near Seattle. Have caught the ferry to the San Juans many times from Anacortes. Beautiful area! Nice drive in, too.

    It’s wet and grey for much of the year. Not an issue for many; a big deal for others. When you visit this area in sunshine, nothing seems prettier. It’s a bit different during the long wet winter, fall and spring.

    #3760306
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    There’s cairns…and then there’s ducks. A duck usually consists of three small rocks. I’ve often found these reassuring and not offensive.

    Groucho Marx did. He famously asked, “why a duck?”

    #3760249
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    It seems to be raining on the Mosquito fire as I write. I really hope so! California needs a break from fires. We all do.

    #3760188
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    You might look at the Big Agnes Fly Creek. It’s semi-free standing however. The body of the fly can stay attached to the fly when packing so it’s effectively fly-first pitch.

    #3760116
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Yes, what DWR D said.

    If bears aren’t an issue, why not just hang your food?

    Murali seems far more concerned about possible bear attacks than I am. He carries a bear bell! well, in grizzly country I would too. So…after all the stories about bear attacks, and wearing a bell, why then would you sleep with food in your tent? It doesn’t make sense.

    #3760014
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “By all means, for peace of mind, use a bear canister always. Isn’t it the same as using a 0.51 DCF tent and getting ripped by hail and dying of hypothermia?”

    No.

    You’ve reached your conclusion and no amount of contrary evidence will make you change your mind. And so you’re left making absurd comparisons to justify your thinking.

    #3760007
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

     

    I once stupidly brought into my tent a bottle of vitamin C (don’t ask). soon after falling asleep I was nudged awake by a bear reaching in from the outside of my tent towards the bottle of vitamins by my side. My point is that bears aren’t logic machines. They know when you’re sleeping; they know if you’re awake. They may well know if you’ve been good or bad. So put your food in a canister for goodness sake.

    Ummm…anyway, in my experience, mostly in and around Yosemite and the Sierra (MIT, for bears) bears are very intelligent and discriminating. and habituated. The bear I just described was familiar with tents, and hoping that the bottle of vitamins was in something like a vestibule. If so, he or she could steal it without waking me. Clever animal!

    #3759890
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Actually, that map looks pretty clear to me. Maybe you need (new) glasses?

    #3759696
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “My only concern with the appliance is the TMJ and bite are off every morning. There is a second devise to use every morning to realign the bite  but not sure what the long term effect will b e.”

    yeah, there’s the rub. many people also find the devices can loosen their teeth. some can make them work, although they’re not very good for those with more severe apnea.

    The machine is actually easy to use. I use a nasal mask, that fits under the nose and doesn’t cover my face.

    Again, “chin tuck” turns out to be more prevalent as a cause and it’s worth trying a soft foam neck brace to prevent doing that when you sleep. folks effectively close their airway doing this. Lightweight for backpacking too.

    #3759674
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Yosemite is my nearest, best, backpacking destination. Or Tahoe. So, lots of people. Even so: six hours in away from trailheads, and their are no crowds; further still, fewer people still.

    It’s always obvious which campsites are heavily used. Sometimes I stay in them. In the morning, if I can, I wait until I’m well away on trail to find a good looking, not used, area to do my business. There are many thousands of acres of land just off the trail. Bear and deer and coyote and all animals are pooping there regularly. If done well, my little dump will merely add to the biomass over the years.

    I try to scout out a spot at evening for the next morning’s business, knowing that coffee may force the issue. I usually stay within timberline. As such, there’s going to be soil out in the trees. I wet down my tp to help it dissolve.

    However, After a lot of initial reservation, I’m warming to the idea of a bidet. I’ll have to practice at home to convince me.

    #3759566
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “I won’t repeat my warning about taking medical advice from anonymous people on the internet : )”

    I will. I have sleep apnea. Jerry’s right: it won’t kill me. It does, however, make me miserable without treatment. Torturers use sleep deprivation to drive their victims mad. Welcome to sleep apnea.

    Oh and apnea exacerbates any existing conditions, that MAY kill me.

    Jerry’s also right that there are no good options for powering a cpap while backpacking. There are a number of small, light devices that will help, but they require a lot of power. Go to cpap dot com and other sites to explore this.

    I’ve spent hundreds of nights out backpacking both before and after my diagnosis. I usually slept pretty well. After diagnosis I used nasal strips and even a cheapy little in-the-nose device that didn’t help at all. A neck collar is light and may help if your apnea is caused by “chin tuck” that blocks your airway. Look this last up! there are also very pricey dental devices to treat apnea that may work for mild cases, but they have their own drawbacks. For most patients, they don’t work.

    Sleep medicine doctors are mostly awful and won’t look past the obvious for treatment. You’ll have to figure a lot out for yourself, IME.

    in the meantime, use the cpap machine at home. I never spend a night without one. Dreams are wonderful; so is rem sleep.

    #3759499
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    “I use a thin piece foam under it as well as a Tyvek ground sheet under my shelter.”

    The keys to longevity of any air mat.”

    Yes. When people report issues with any pad, I always wonder if they used it naked or with appropriate protection underneath. and no, I’m not talking about them, I’m  speaking about the pad.

    Otherwise, HYOY etc.

    #3759496
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    I forgot to add to the post above: a friend sent me an Ecard from a company that I’ve been receiving and sending ecards from for two years or so. Suddenly, I can’t load her card or send a reply via that card company web site. Their Q and A section mentions that they’ve recently run into problems with Chrome users.

    edit: I jsut updated Chrome and can now load the ecard. I thought that Chrome automatically updated. Apparently not. Possible source of the issue?

    #3759491
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    It occurs to me that this may happen when I hit the ‘recent posts’ tag right after logging on to the home page. Even if the circle thing has stopped turning, it may be that the page needs a few more seconds to fully optimize…? and then once I get the message, it’s game over for some time.

    The above is just an impression and may be entirely off base.

    #3759269
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    Notch Li. Done and done.

    wait: snow? How much snow? are you looking for a four season tent?

    #3759111
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    My name is on the permit, along with my address and phone number; plus they have it at the issuing center. But if a squirrel eats the permit while my body lies a’molderin’…I’ll go down as another John Doe, aka, nobody, along with Emily.

    #3759105
    jscott
    BPL Member

    @book

    Locale: Northern California

    when backpacking, I don’t carry a phone and I don’t carry I.D., so a photo of my permit would be useless.

    As Craig mentions, I’ve been checked…oh I dunno..three times over 3 plus decades? I am pretty scrupulous about getting permits. The chance of a ranger coming along asking for my papers, coupled with a chipmunk eating that very permit, is vanishingly small. I’ll leave all the unnecessary crap behind and just take my chances. That’s part of why I’m out there: leave the crap behind.

    It turns out I actually do exist off-line and apart from stamped certification. who knew?

    emily dickinson:

    I’m Nobody! Who are you?
    Are you – Nobody – too?
    Then there’s a pair of us!
    Don’t tell! they’d advertise – you know!

     

     

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